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Using Emotion to Drive Brand Loyalty

Posted by Heather Magaw

Mon, Feb 13, 2017

Valentine's Day image.jpeg

Stores have been stocked with heart-shaped candies and cards since December, but now that it’s actually February, I think it’s okay to think about Valentine’s Day.  And because love is in the air (as well as on the shelves) it’s a perfect time to think about how brands can tap into this fundamental human experience to drive consideration, usage and loyalty.  

We already know that understanding and influencing consumers’ emotions is crucial for building a loyal customer base, but what do we really know about love that could help us achieve those lofty outcomes? Based on a quick Google search (and a few life experiences), here’s what I’ve learned so far:

Love is an emotion.

Love is an action.

Love is a biological motivation system.

Love is an attitude.

Love is a drive.

Love is a choice.

Love is patient.

Love is blind.

Love is a battlefield.

Love, as it turns out, is rather complex. So what does that mean for marketers trying to get people to fall in love with their brands? Where do you start?  

When studying emotion, traditionally researchers take a brand-centric approach and focus on how consumers feel about the brand. While there’s valuable insight there, it’s often more valuable to take a consumer-centric approach, one that asks consumers how the brand makes them feel. Consumers develop feelings about a brand because of how it makes them feel… understanding those feelings evoked by the brand is critical insight into how consumers develop strong, positive sentiments towards the brand.

That’s why EMPACTSM, our proprietary approach to measuring emotion, is based on decades of consumer psychology research, helping marketers understand how a brand or touchpoint should make consumers feel to most effectively drive their behaviors, and ultimately brand love.

For marketers trying to earn consumers’ love this Valentine’s Day (and the other 364 days of the year), it’s critical to explore which emotions your brand should evoke to make them love your brand. Do they want to feel respected? Proud? Efficient? Secure? Surprised?  Just like with the object of your romantic affections, you’ll be far more successful with your customers if you ask them how they want to feel and create experiences and messaging that inspire those emotions. [twitter.png Tweet this!]  

Heather Magaw is VP of Client Services at CMB. The brands she loves most this Valentine’s season are Apple, Amazon, Red Sox, IBM Watson, and CMB (of course!).  

Topics: EMPACT, emotional measurement, emotion

The Power of Identity: A Look at Super Bowl LI Advertising

Posted by Savannah House

Fri, Feb 10, 2017

As a Boston-based strategy and research firm, we CMBers had high expectations for both the Patriots’ performance and of course, the Super Bowl ads. I’m happy to report that neither disappointed.

111 million people tuned into last Sunday’s game, making Super Bowl LI the fifth most-watched TV broadcast in history. But of those 111 million people, surely not all of them are Pats, Falcons, or even football fans. So while it’s hard for us New Englanders to believe, some people watch the Super Bowl (at least in part) for the commercials. After all, each year brands vie to have the most talked and tweeted about ad – setting the bar high to deliver quality, original, and memorable content.

In this divisive time, many brands were commended for tackling culturally relevant issues head on. And while I thought there were a number of really beautiful ads, I’d like to suggest a few other criteria for evaluation: 

  • How well does the ad align with the Super Bowl occasion?
  • Could you connect the ad to the brand and the value of the brand?
  • Did it communicate a compelling image of the brand’s typical user?
Question three is of particular interest to me because it’s related to our newest research solution, AffinIDSM.  AffinID helps brands understand their target consumers’ image of the typical person who uses their brand and finds ways to strategically influence that image to strengthen how much consumers identify with the image. Our research shows that the more consumers can identify with their image of the typical person who uses the brand, the more they will try, buy, pay for, and recommend the brand. This way of measuring brand perception is different from the traditional brand-centric approach (“What do I think of the brand?”) because it focuses on perceived brand user image.

AffinID measures how compelling a brand user image is based on its clarity, relatability, and social desirability; so from an advertising perspective, we’re interested in evaluating how well the spot communicates a clear, relatable, and socially desirable message of who the brand’s typical consumer is.

That said, I thought it’d be fun to review a few popular Super Bowl LI ads through an AffinID lens:

"Romance" from Skittles
Created by: Adam & Eve/DDB

 Reminiscent of the classic “pebbles at the window” scene, Skittles “Romance” features a love struck teenager throwing Skittles through his beloved’s bedroom window. The Skittles are intended for his love, but unbeknownst to the teen, she’s actually letting her mom, dad, grandmother, home intruder, policeman, beaver (?) etc. take turns catching candy in their mouths.

  • Clarity: Skittles is sending the message that everyone (even beavers?) eats their candy. While this inclusive message resonates with a wide audience, it may diminish the brand’s clarity of who the stereotypical customer is.
  • Relatability: “Romance” features a wide range of Skittles customers, making its image of the typical user highly relatable. 
  • Social Desirability: From the looks of the ad, everyone seems to be having a great time eating Skittles. Who wouldn’t want to be friends with them?

Skittles_AffinID.png

"Yearbooks" from Honda
Created by: RPA

 Bust out your high tops and cassette tapes because Honda’s “Yearbooks” will take you for a trip down memory lane. “Yearbooks” features animated yearbook pictures of heavy hitters like Tina Fey, Robert Redford, Steve Carrell, Missy Elliott, Viola Davis and Jimmy Kimmel celebrating the notion of “chasing dreams and the amazing places they lead” yearbooks typically evoke.

  • Clarity: While it’s fun to see high school versions of celebrities like Amy Adams and Magic Johnson, the ad features so many different people that it’s not clear who the typical Honda CR-V driver is.
  • Relatability: I think to some extent we can all relate to someone in this ad. Even though they’re famous celebrities who may not be relatable in real life, in the ad they’re portrayed as normal high school students excited about their future. And really, who didn’t go through an awkward high school phase?
  • Social Desirability: This is undoubtedly a fun ad, but there’s not a strong social desirability here. Though warm-hearted, it doesn’t portray an aspirational social identity like other car commercials do – specifically ones that feature successful and sexy drivers.
Honda_AffinID.png

"Google Home" from Google
Created by: 72andSunny

The Google Home spot hasn’t gotten much love in “best of” articles about this year’s Super Bowl ads, but it may have helped Google Home take major strides across “the chasm”—while unintentionally setting off a bunch of the systems in homes of those who already had it. In the 60 second spot, the voice-activated smart speaker “welcomes” home people from a variety of backgrounds (younger, older, parents, pet-owners) and is used, seemingly with ease, to do things like turn on the lights and translate helpful phrases like “Nice to meet you” from English to Spanish.

  • Clarity: Mass market consumers probably lack a clear image of kind of person who has a virtual assistant—or assume that it’s an affluent early-adopter. While the people shown in the Google Home spot were diverse, they all shared an “everyday” quality that was likely clearer and more relevant than the image most Super Bowl viewers had had before they saw it.
  • Relatability: Where Google Home lacks clarity, it makes up for in relatability. Since the ad features people from all walks of life, it’s pretty easy to find someone you can relate to – whether it’s the young couple with sleepy kids or the mother in need of an ingredient substitution while she cooks for her family.
  • Social Desirability: The ad’s feel-good theme throughout makes me want to jump into any of the scenes – it’s 60 seconds of friends and family hugging, laughing, and loving. If that’s not socially desirable, I don’t know what is.
Google_AffinID-2.png

As marketing, insights, and advertising professionals know, there’s way more to developing and testing messaging than my quick “analysis”. That’s why we created AffinID – to help brands and their agencies develop effective, consumer-centric strategies for growth by recognizing the power of consumer identity in brand decision-making. 

Learn more about AffinID by watching our latest webinar with Dr. Erica Carranza—CMB’s VP of Consumer Psychology. And let us know which ads you found engaging (or not) in the comments.

Watch Now

Savannah House is a Senior Marketing Coordinator at CMB who places as much weight on the quality of the Super Bowl snacks as she does the commercials.

Topics: consumer insights, brand health and positioning, AffinID

A Lesson in Storytelling from the NFL MVP Race

Posted by Jen Golden

Thu, Feb 02, 2017

american football.jpg

There’s always a lot of debate in the weeks leading up to the NFL’s announcement of its regular season MVP. While the recipient is often from a team with a strong regular season record, it’s not always that simple. Of course the MVP's season stats are an important factor in who comes out on top, but a good story also influences the outcome. 

Take this year, we have a few excellent contenders for the crown, including…

  • Ezekiel Elliot, the rookie running back on the Dallas Cowboys
  • Tom Brady, the NE Patriots QB coming back from a four game “Deflategate” suspension
  • Matt Ryan, the Atlanta Falcons veteran “nice-guy” QB having a career year

Ultimately, deciding the winner is a mix of art and science. And while you’re probably wondering what this has to do with market research, the NFL regular season MVP selection process has a few important things in common with the creation of a good report. [Twitter bird-1.pngTweet this!]

First, make a framework: Having a framework for your research project can help keep you from feeling overwhelmed by the amount of data in front of you. In the MVP race, for example, voters should start by listing attributes they think make an MVP: team record, individual record, strength of schedule, etc. These attributes are a good way to narrow down potential candidates. In research, the framework might include laying out the business objectives and the data available for each. This outline helps focus the narrative and guide the story’s structure.

Then, look at the whole picture: Once the data is compiled, take a step back and think about how the pieces relate to one another and the context of each. Let’s look at Tom Brady’s regular season stats as an example. He lags behind league leaders on total passing yards and TDs, but remember that he missed four games with a suspension. When the regular season is only 12 games, missing a quarter of those was a missed opportunity to garner points, so you can’t help but wonder if it’s a fair comparison to make. Here’s where it’s important to look at the whole picture (whether we’re talking about research or MVP picks). If you don’t have the entire context, you could dismiss Brady altogether. In research, a meaningful story builds on all the primary data within larger social, political, and/or business contexts.

Finally, back it up with facts:  Once the pieces have come together, you need to back up your key storyline (or MVP pick) with facts to prove your credibility. For example, someone could vote for Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. because of an impressive once-in-a-lifetime catch he made during the regular season. But beyond the catch there wouldn’t be much data to support that he was more deserving than the other candidates. In a research report, you must support your story with solid data and evidence.  The predictions will continue until the 2016 regular season MVP is named, but whoever that ends up being, he will have a strong story and the stats to back it up.

 Jen is a Sr. PM on the Technology/E-commerce team. She hopes Tom Brady will take the MVP crown to silence his “Deflategate” critics – what a story that would be.

Topics: data collection, storytelling, marketing science

Panels: The Unsung Research Hero

Posted by Will Buxton

Wed, Jan 25, 2017

Who We Are.jpg

Market research has its rock star methodologies—segmentations, conjoint analyses, Bayes Nets —attention-grabbing methods that can garner incredible insights and drive acquisition and growth. You can find a lot of blogs (and white papers and conference presentations) on these methods but this blog isn’t one of them. No, this blog is dedicated to the unsung research methodology: proprietary panels.

Admittedly, a panel doesn’t sound sexy—it's a group of respondents who are regularly tapped to answer business questions relating to anything from product testing to ad testing. Whether it’s a consumer or business-to-business (B2B) panel, panels collect ongoing feedback from a select group of people who adhere to certain criteria.

So why consider a panel for your next research project?

Quality participants: Panels offer on-demand access to a pool of aware, engaged, and knowledgeable participants who are typically well-versed in the client/product offerings.

Speed of production: Panelists provide the opportunity for “quick hit” projects that typically require upfront education, set up, and programming time.

Efficiency: Panels use a standard process for timing, deployment and reporting, all of this saves time—both for the provider and the client.

Cost: Depending on survey length and complexity, a panel can be a more cost-effective way to contact customers/providers because of the preexisting relationship between client and panelist. This can avoid the need for large incentives.

Responsiveness: Panelists are more responsive than Gen Pop sample because of the aforementioned relationship. This allows for a quicker collection of more respondents and a faster project turnaround.

Dedicated resources: Each panel (at least here at CMB) has a dedicated, well-trained team that is privy to how the panel operates, including client restrictions and best practices.

So while traditional MaxDiff or Discrete Choice Model might have more buzzword appeal around the office, don’t underestimate the value a customer/B2B panel can bring to your research project.            [Twitter bird.pngTweet this!]

Will is a Project Manager who is clearly trying to turn CMB into a panel house.

PS – Join Dr. Erica Carranza on 2/1 and learn about our newest methodology, AffinIDSM, that’s grounded in the importance of consumer identity.

Register Now!

 

Topics: methodology, consumer insights, panels

Marketer Beware: Brand User Stereotypes Bias How Consumers See Your Ads

Posted by Dr. Erica Carranza

Thu, Jan 19, 2017

Imagine you see the picture below in an ad for Jack Daniels. Who is this guy? Where is he? What’s he like?

Man in boat_v2.jpg

I see a middle-aged man somewhere in the south. He’s out fishing. He’s a stoic, rugged, “salt of the earth” kind of guy. He drives a truck—and if it breaks down, he can fix it himself, thank you very much.

But what if, instead, you saw this image in an ad for the clothing brand Patagonia? What would you think about the man in the picture?

I’d imagine him on adventure vacation someplace exotic. He’s from California. He cares about looking good, feeling good, and doing good. Later, he’ll be scaling a mountain and drinking a juice cleanse.

In other words, if he’s in an ad for Patagonia (vs. Jack Daniels), I’d make a whole different set of assumptions.

This effect is driven by our tendency to develop stereotypes. After all, consumers are people, and people are social animals. We tend to categorize other people into types, and use our beliefs about those types to guide our perceptions, expectations, and behaviors. Stereotypes can be nefarious, no doubt. But they’re a fact of life. They’re a mental shortcut we’ve evolved in order to navigate a complex world—and they’re hard to avoid because they often operate at an unconscious level.

A brand can easily become the basis for a stereotype—an image of the kind of person who uses that brand (e.g., the kind of guy who drinks JD, or wears Patagonia). And that image can bias how consumers see the brand’s advertising.

Case in point: Research we conducted for a financial services brand with a reputation for being popular among older, affluent consumers.

The goal was to test advertising that would broaden the brand’s appeal—particularly among Millennials. But when we showed Millennial prospects an ad with a picture like the one above, they assumed that the man was much older. They said things like: “He was a Wall Street businessman. Now he’s retired and canoeing alone on a lake… This is probably his last vacation.” (Ouch!) To succeed in shaking-up their image of who uses the brand, the ads had to unambiguously portray customers in young adult life stages (e.g., a couple having their first baby).

The ads also had to show activities that were appealing without being too out-of-reach. Pictures of twenty-somethings yachting, or at the ballet, just reinforced prospects’ ingoing image of uber-wealthy customers with whom they couldn’t relate. ("I don't identify with any of these pictures! I don't own a boat… I never go to the ballet.”) And, for some prospects, these pictures just seemed unrealistic. Yachting Millennials didn’t fit with any type of person they knew.

Another pitfall were pictures of young people that struck prospects as realistic, but inadvertently
triggered other negative stereotypes. For example, a picture of a man wearing a hat like this…hipster hat (cropped).jpg

…triggered a “Hipster” image, and that was a turn-off. Prospects didn’t think they had much in common with him, didn’t aspire to be like him—and definitely wouldn’t want to hang out with him.

These perceptions matter a lot. Consumers’ image of a brand’s typical user needs to feel real and be compelling—because, as I wrote in an earlier blog, consumers’ image of the kind of person who uses a brand can really help (or really hinder!) brand growth. To attract consumers, the image should feel like a kind of person they know and like, or would like to know.

Here’s the good news: Marketing can play a powerful role in shaping that image. Not to say that it’s easy. Great marketing is art + science. So we developed AffinIDSM to support brands and agencies with science that can help them get the art of the marketing right. More specifically, AffinIDSM is a research solution designed to tackle three key questions:

  • What is consumers’ current image of the brand’s typical user?
    Note: They may not have a clear image, which is a challenge and opportunity for the brand—but that’s a topic for a different day!
  • How compelling is that image?
  • How should you optimize that image?
    In other words: What should marketing and brand initiatives seek to communicate about the kind of person who uses the brand in order to drive consumer engagement?

Then we can test ads to make sure that they convey the intended image, and that they avoid hard-to-predict missteps. (See above re: the “Hipster” hat… Who knew?)

I’ll be talking about AffinIDSM in an upcoming webinar. Curious? Sign-up below!

In the meantime, “The More You Know” lesson for today is that consumers’ image of a brand’s typical user—and their stereotypes of people in general—will bias their perceptions of marketing, whether we like it or not. The best course of action is to understand what those images are, the effect they have on consumers, and how to strategically influence them so that they work in the brand’s favor.  Tweet: @cmbinfo Consumers’ image of a brand’s typical user bias their perceptions of marketing https://ctt.ec/b254L+[Tweet this]

Erica Carranza is CMB’s VP of Consumer Psychology. She has supplier- and client-side market research experience, and earned her Ph.D. in social psychology from Princeton University.

PS – Have you registered for our webinar yet!? Join Erica as she explains why to change what consumers think of your brand, you must change their image of the people who use it.

What: The Key to Consumer-Centricity: Your Brand User Image

When: February 1, 2017 @ 1PM EST

Register Now!

Topics: consumer insights, webinar, brand health and positioning, AffinID

Dear Dr. Jay: HOW can we trust predictive models after the 2016 election?

Posted by Dr. Jay Weiner

Thu, Jan 12, 2017

Dear Dr. Jay,

After the 2016 election, how will I ever be able to trust predictive models again?

Alyssa


Dear Alyssa,

Data Happens!

Whether we’re talking about political polling or market research, to build good models, we need good inputs. Or as the old saying goes: “garbage in, garbage out”.  Let’s look at all the sources of error in the data itself:DRJAY-9-2.png

  • First, we make it too easy for respondents to say “yes” and “no” and they try to help us by guessing what answer we want to hear. For example, we ask for purchase intent to a new product idea. The respondent often overstates the true likelihood of buying the product.
  • Second, we give respondents perfect information. We create 100% awareness when we show the respondent a new product concept.  In reality, we know we will never achieve 100% awareness in the market.  There are some folks who live under a rock and of course, the client will never really spend enough money on advertising to even get close.
  • Third, the sample frame may not be truly representative of the population we hope to project to. This is one of the key issues in political polling because the population is comprised of those who actually voted (not registered voters).  For models to be correct, we need to predict which voters will actually show up to the polls and how they voted.  The good news in market research is that the population is usually not a moving target.

Now, let’s consider the sources of error in building predictive models.  The first step in building a predictive model is to specify the model.  If you’re a purist, you begin with a hypotheses, collect the data, test the hypotheses and draw conclusions.  If we fail to reject the null hypotheses, we should formulate a new hypotheses and collect new data.  What do we actually do?  We mine the data until we get significant results.  Why?  Because data collection is expensive.  One possible outcome from continuing to mine the data looking for a better model is a model that is only good at predicting the data you have and not too accurate in predicting the results using new inputs. 

It is up to the analyst to decide what is statistically meaningful versus what is managerially meaningful.  There are a number of websites where you can find “interesting” relationships in data.  Some examples of spurious correlations include:

  • Divorce rate in Maine and the per capita consumption of margarine
  • Number of people who die by becoming entangled in their bedsheets and the total revenue of US ski resorts
  • Per capita consumption of mozzarella cheese (US) and the number of civil engineering doctorates awarded (US)

In short, you can build a model that’s accurate but still wouldn’t be of any use (or make any sense) to your client. And the fact is, there’s always a certain amount of error in any model we build—we could be wrong, just by chance.  Ultimately, it’s up to the analyst to understand not only the tools and inputs they’re using but the business (or political) context.

Dr. Jay loves designing really big, complex choice models.  With over 20 years of DCM experience, he’s never met a design challenge he couldn’t solve. 

PS – Have you registered for our webinar yet!? Join Dr. Erica Carranza as she explains why to change what consumers think of your brand, you must change their image of the people who use it.

What: The Key to Consumer-Centricity: Your Brand User Image

When: February 1, 2017 @ 1PM EST

Register Now!

 

 

Topics: methodology, data collection, Dear Dr. Jay, predictive analytics

A New Year’s Resolution: Closing the Gap Between Intent and Action

Posted by Indra Chapman

Wed, Jan 04, 2017

resolutions.jpg

Are you one of the more than 100 million adults in the U.S. who made a New Year’s resolution? Do you resolve to lose weight, exercise more, spend less and save more, or just be a better person?

Top 10 New Year's Resolutions for 2016:

  • Lose Weight
  • Getting Organized
  • Spend less, save more
  • Enjoy Life to the Fullest
  • Staying Fit and Healthy
  • Learn Something Exciting
  • Quit Smoking
  • Help Others in Their Dreams
  • Fall in Love
  • Spend More Time with Family
[Source: StatisticBrain.com]

The actual number varies from year to year, but generally more than four out of 10 of us make some type of resolution for the New Year. And now that we’re a few days into 2017, we’re seeing the impact of those New Year resolutions. Gyms and fitness classes are crowded (Pilates anyone?), and self-improvement and diet book sales are up.

But… (there’s that inevitable but!), despite the best of intentions, within a week, at least a quarter of us have abandoned that resolution, and by the end of the month, more than a third of us have dropped out of the race. In fact, several studies suggest that only 8% of us actually go on to achieve our resolutions. Alas, we see that behavior no longer follows intention.

It’s not so different in market research because we see the same gap between consumer intention and behavior. Sometimes the gap is fairly small, and other times it’s substantial. Consumers (with the best of intentions) tell us what they plan to do, but their follow through is not always consistent. This, as you might imagine, can lead to bad data. [ twitter icon-1.pngTweet this!]

So what does this mean?

To help close the gap and gather more accurate data, ask yourself the following questions when designing your next study:

  • What are the barriers to adoption or the path to behavior? Are there other factors or elements within the customer journey to consider?
  • Are you assessing the non-rational components? Are there social, psychological or economic implications to them following through with that rational selection? After all, consider that many of us know that exercising daily is good for us – but so few of us follow through.
  • Are there other real life factors that you should consider in analysis of the survey? Does the respondent’s financial situation make that preference more aspirational than intentional?

So what are your best practices for closing the gap between consumer intent and action? If you don’t already have a New Year’s resolution (or if you do, add this one!), why not resolve to make every effort to connect consumer intent to behavior in your studies during 2017.

Another great resolution is to become a better marketer!  How?

Register for our upcoming webinar with Dr. Erica Carranza on consumer identity and the power of measuring brand user image to help create meaningful and relevant messaging for your customers and prospects:

Register Now!

Indra Chapman is a Senior Project Manager at CMB, who has resolved to set goals in lieu of new year’s resolutions this year. In the words of Brad Paisley, the first day of the new year “is the first blank page of a 365-page book. Write a good one.”

Topics: data collection, research design

A Year in Review: Our Favorite Blogs from 2016

Posted by Savannah House

Thu, Dec 29, 2016

pexels-photo (2).jpg

What a year 2016 was.

In a year characterized by disruption, one constant is how we approach our blog: each CMBer contributes at least one post per year. And while asking each employee to write may seem cumbersome, it’s our way of ensuring that we provide you with a variety of perspectives, experiences, and insights into the ever-evolving world of market research, analytics, and consulting.

Before the clock strikes midnight and we bid adieu to this year, let’s take a moment to reflect on some favorite blogs we published over the last twelve months:

    1. When you think of a Porsche driver, who comes to mind? How old is he? What’s she like? Whoever it is, along with that image comes a perceived favored 2016 presidential candidate. Harnessing AffinIDSM and the results of our 2016 Consumer Identity Research, we found a skew towards one of the candidates for nearly every one of the 90 brands we tested.  Read Erica Carranza’s post and check out brands yourself with our interactive dashboard. Interested in learning more? Join Erica for our upcoming webinar: The Key to Consumer-Centricity: Your Brand User Image  
    2. During introspection, it’s easy to focus on our weaknesses. But what if we put all that energy towards our strengths? Blair Bailey discusses the benefits of Strength-Based Leadership—realizing growth potential in developing our strengths rather than focusing on our weaknesses. In 2017, let’s all take a page from Blair’s book and concentrate on what we’re good at instead of what we aren’t.
    3. Did you attend a conference in 2016? Going to any in 2017? CMB’s Business Development Lead, Julie Kurd, maps out a game plan to get the most ROI from attending a conference. Though this post is specific to TMRE, these recommendations could be applied to any industry conference where you’re aiming to garner leads and build relationships. 
    4. In 2016 we released the results of our Social Currency research – a five industry, 90 brand study to identify which consumer behaviors drive equity and Social Currency. Of the industry reports, one of our favorites is the beer edition. So pull up a stool, grab a pint, and learn from Ed Loessi, Director of Product Development and Innovation, how Social Currency helps insights pros and marketers create content and messaging that supports consumer identity.
    5. It’s a mobile world and we’re just living in it. Today we (yes, we) expect to use our smartphones with ease and have little patience for poor design. And as market researchers who depend on a quality pool of human respondents, the trend towards mobile is a reality we can’t ignore. CMB’s Director of Field Services, Jared Huizenga, weighs in on how we can adapt to keep our smart(phone) respondents happy – at least long enough for them to “complete” the study. 
    6. When you think of “innovation,” what comes to mind? The next generation iPhone? A self-driving car? While there are obvious tangible examples of innovation, professional service agencies like CMB are innovating, too. In fact, earlier this year we hired Ed Loessi to spearhead our Product Development and Innovation team. Sr. Research Associate, Lauren Sears, sat down with Ed to learn more about what it means for an agency like CMB to be “innovative.” 
    7. There’s something to be said for “too much of a good thing” – information being one of those things. To help manage the data overload we (and are clients) are often exposed to, Project Manager, Jen Golden, discusses the merits of focusing on one thing at a time (or research objective), keeping a clear space (or questionnaire) and avoiding trending topics (or looking at every single data point in a report). 
    8. According to our 2016 study on millennials and money, women ages 21-30 are driven, idealistic, and feel they budget and plan well enough. However, there’s a disparity when it comes to confidence in investing: nearly twice as many young women don’t feel confident in their investing decisions compared to their male counterparts. Lori Vellucci discusses how financial service providers have a lot of work to do to educate, motivate and inspire millennial women investors. 
    9. Admit it, you can’t get enough of Prince William and Princess Kate. The British Royals are more than a family – they’re a brand that’s embedded itself into the bedrock of American pop culture. So if the Royals can do it, why can’t other British brands infiltrate the coveted American marketplace, too? Before a brand enters a new international market, British native and CMB Project Manager, Josh Fortey, contends, the decision should be based on a solid foundation of research.
    10. We round out our list with a favorite from our “Dear Dr. Jay Series.” When considering a product, we often focus on its functional benefits. But as Dr. Jay, our VP of Advanced Analytics and Chief Methodologist, explains, the emotional attributes (how the brand/product makes us feel) are about as predictive of future behaviors of the functional benefits of the product. So brands, let's spread the love!

We thank you for being a loyal reader throughout 2016. Stay tuned because we’ve got some pretty cool content for 2017 that you won’t want to miss.

From everyone at CMB, we wish you much health and success in 2017 and beyond.

PS - There’s still time to make your New Year’s Resolution! Become a better marketer in 2017 and signup for our upcoming webinar on consumer identity:

Register Now!

 

Savannah House is a Senior Marketing Coordinator at CMB. A lifelong aspiration of hers is to own a pet sloth, but since the Boston rental market isn’t so keen on exotic animals, she’d settle for a visit to the Sloth Sanctuary in Costa Rica.

 

Topics: strategy consulting, advanced analytics, methodology, consumer insights

Happiness is...

Posted by Talia Fein

Wed, Dec 21, 2016

 

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My senior year of college I interviewed at several market research firms. While there was a lot to like about many of them, CMB had a unique vibe that convinced me this was where I should start my career. As it turned out, my instincts were right. CMB was fantastic at teaching a novice associate like me the fundamentals of Market Research; I quickly developed a love for the clients, the work, and “All Things Data.” 

When I left CMB after three years for a chance to live overseas and then a stint in D.C., I had experience working with incredible brands, super-smart colleagues, and I’d developed a competitive skillset. Almost two years ago, I was offered the opportunity to return and rather than rely on my gut, I had to answer questions my 22-year-old self hadn’t considered:

What made CMB so special?

In the New York Times op-ed “The One Question You Should Ask About Every New Job,” Adam Grant, professor of management and psychology at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, discusses the relationship between company culture and happiness in the workplace. “Although finding the right title, position and salary is important,” he writes, “there’s another consideration that matters just as much: culture. The culture of a workplace — an organization’s values, norms, and practices — has a huge impact on our happiness and success.”

What does it mean to have good company culture, and how do you find it?

In writing this blog post, I asked a few people what company culture means to them, and specifically, what they considered characteristics of a good company culture. Responses were what you’d probably expect: Ping-pong tables, Friday happy hours, free lunch.  In short, answers were unanimous: good company culture means fun and free food.

Really? The holy grail of work happiness is free food?

OK, it’s a little more complicated than a couple slices of pizza. In his article, Grant cites a classic study that analyzed employee stories from across industries about their workplaces. In the study, researchers identified three fundamental themes: Justice (Is it a fair place?), Security (Is it safe to work there?) and Control (Can a person shape their destiny and have influence in the organization?). Ironically, these stories underscore an organizational uniqueness bias – people think their company culture is more unique than it really is.

But organizational uniqueness bias aside, this study also suggests that company culture isn’t defined by free food. Rather, it’s defined by an organization’s values.

That’s not to discredit the tangible stuff. Those things certainly are important to a company’s culture.  In fact, MIT professor Edgar H. Schein calls that stuff “the most visible parts of an organization’s culture… [its] artifacts and practices — how people talk, look and act.” But he, like the study Grant cited, contends that more important than overt office perks are the company’s operating principles.  [ twitter icon.png Tweet this!]

So how do we identify those proverbial “company values?” Despite organizational uniqueness bias, I’ve noticed a few CMB characteristics that have made it special to me:

  1. The organization feels “flat” (i.e., non-hierarchical)

Of course we have job titles and levels (see #3 below), but at CMB each person knows they are valued and their opinions are valid and respected. Our founder and CEO, Anne Bailey Berman, encourages us all to “be a squeaky wheel” – CMBers aren’t afraid to speak up because we know we’ll be heard.

  1. “We are a group of lively and engaging individuals”

Even though that’s a direct quote from the old CMB website (at least two or three website iterations ago), it still rings true today. And while a lot of companies make similar claims, I’d venture to say some are exaggerating. But not CMB. In fact, every CMB job description includes a line that says we’re looking for people who are “collaborative, enthusiastic, and who can put their ego aside, roll up their sleeves and get the job done.” To me, this line perfectly describes the CMB vibe.

  1. The company wants us (as individuals) to succeed

At every level and in every corner of the organization, CMB leadership is invested in individual development and growth (both personal and professional). Beyond our job responsibilities, we’re encouraged to learn and grow in experience whether through our internal mentorship program, a workshop, conference, or something else. A great example of CMB’s commitment to individual success is our ability to choose our career path. Research associates are given the opportunity to choose their trajectory based on their skills and interests. In carving our own paths, we’re able to excel in our jobs and deliver better experiences and results for our clients.

Organizational uniqueness bias may suggest that people think their organization’s cultures are more distinctive than they really are, but I believe that CMB’s culture truly is special and unique. It certainly has gotten this CMBer to stick around.

Talia is a Project Manager on CMB’s Technology and eCommerce practice. She was named one of Survey Magazine’s 2015 Data Dominators and as a native Bostonian, couldn’t be happier to be back in the city.

 

Topics: millennials, emotion

But first... how do you feel?

Posted by Lori Vellucci

Wed, Dec 14, 2016

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How does your brand make consumers feel?  It’s a tough but important question and the answer will often vary between customers and prospects or between segments within your customer base.  Understanding and influencing consumers’ emotions is crucial for building a loyal customer base; and scientific research, market research, and conventional wisdom all suggest that to attract and engage consumers, emotions are a key piece of the puzzle. 

CMB designed EMPACTSM, a proprietary quantitative approach to understanding how a brand, product, touchpoint, or experience should make a consumer feel in order to drive their behaviors.  Measuring valence (how bad or good) and activation (low to high energy) across basic emotions (e.g., happy, sad, etc.), social and self-conscious emotions (e.g., pride, embarrassment, nostalgia, etc.) and other relevant feelings and mental states (e.g., social connection, cognitive ease, etc.), EMPACT has proved to be a practical, comprehensive, and robust tool.  The key insights around emotions emerge which can then drive communication to elicit the desired emotions and drive consumer behavior.  But while EMPACT has been used extensively as a quantitative tool, it is also an important component when conducting qualitative research.

In order to achieve the most bang for the buck with qualitative research, every researcher knows that having the right people in the room (or in front of the video-enabled IDI) is a critical first step.  You screen for demographics and behaviors and sometimes attitudes, but have you considered emotions?  Ensuring that you recruit respondents who feel a specific way when considering your brand or product is critical to being able to glean the most insight from qualitative work. (Tweet this!)  Applying an emotional qualifier to respondents allows us to ensure that we are talking to respondents who are in the best position to provide the specific types of insights we’re looking for. 

For example, CMB has a client who learned from a segmentation study which incorporated EMPACT that their brand over-indexed for eliciting certain emotions that tended to drive consumers away from brands within their industry.  The firm had a desire to craft targeted communications to mitigate these negative emotions among this specific strategic consumer segment.  As a first step in testing their marketing message and imagery, focus groups were conducted. 

In addition to using the segmentation algorithm to ensure we had the correct consumer segment in the room, we also included EMPACTscreening to be sure the respondents selected felt the emotions that we wanted to address with new messaging.  In this way, we were able to elicit insights directly related to how well the new messaging worked in mitigating the negative emotions.  Of course we tested the messaging among broader groups as well, but being able to identify and isolate respondents whose emotions we most wish to improve ensured development of great advertising that will move the emotion needle and motivate consumers to try and to love the brand.

Want to learn more about EMPACT? View our webinar by clicking the link below:

Learn More About EMPACT℠

Lori Vellucci is an Account Director at CMB.  She spends her free time purchasing ill-fated penny stocks and learning about mobile payment solutions from her Gen Z daughters.

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, EMPACT, quantitative research