In the News Content

GPShopper.com: Businesses That Offer Mobile Payments Can Steal Customers From Competitors, a Study Finds

Posted on Thu, Aug 13, 2015 @ 02:27 PM

Originally posted on GPShopper.com

15% of U.S. consumers have used a mobile wallet—including Apple Passbook/Apple Pay, Google Wallet/Google Pay, PayPal and Starbucks—during the first half of 2015, which is up from 9% during the first half of 2013, according to a study of 1,716 consumers by research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey. Beyond the 15%, 22% of consumers say they plan to try using a mobile wallet by year’s end, the study finds. So about one in every six U.S. consumers use mobile wallets today, and that number could very soon rise to more than one in three consumers.

Here are the key stats from the Chadwick Martin Bailey study: 27% of mobile wallet users very likely will switch to another business if that business offers mobile payments, and 18% will increase the amount of business they do with a company if that company debuts mobile payments.

I looked in my mobile wallet (Apple Passbook) recently, awaiting a movie to begin after using mobile tickets to enter the theater, and was amused to realize I make fairly healthy use of a mobile wallet. Look at the accompanying image of my mobile wallet: There are two credit cards, one debit card, a Walgreens loyalty card, a AAA member card, and a Fandango movie ticket. Event tickets and coupons also have graced my mobile wallet.

So I say I was “amused” because the only talk you hear of mobile wallets is negative, yet here I am with a rather full wallet. Why is it not a bulging mobile wallet? Not because consumers don’t like mobile wallets, but because retailers don’t offer mobile payments. If you could snap your fingers and make 100% of all retailers accept Near Field Communication (NFC), the wireless technology that facilitates payments between a smartphone and a retailer’s payment terminal, I guarantee you within 12 months of that snap the percentage of U.S. consumers using mobile wallets would easily rise to 33%. About 80% of U.S. mobile phone users have smartphones.

I use Apple Pay everywhere I’m able. I love it. (And I know how to use it correctly and thus realize it is indeed faster—and more secure—than using a plastic card. Click here for more on that sorry subject.) I truly look forward to the day when Illinois makes digital drivers licenses because then I will toss my leather wallet in my “Box o’ Memories” with my 8-track tapes and 45 records and other historical artifacts. The only reason I keep any cash on me today, I should add, is for situations where it is absolutely impossible to pay digitally or with plastic (for example, paying for and tipping a valet).

But guess what? In October, fingers will be snapped, and a requirement to use chip-and-pin card technology goes into effect. Retailers have been transitioning their old payment terminals to new payment terminals capable of accepting payment cards that rely on chips instead of magnetic stripes to communicate payment data. Chips are far more secure than mag stripes. And guess what again? Most payment terminals capable of chip-and-pin transactions also (bonus!) are capable of NFC transactions.

Hey retailers that don’t accept mobile payments—start accepting mobile payments. You’ve got or soon will have the technology. The more retailers that accept mobile payments (and promote mobile payments), the more consumers will use mobile wallets. And more consumers using mobile wallets means more opportunities for retailers to increase loyalty or gain new customers, not merely by offering the technology but by adding mobile coupons and mobile loyalty cards to the mobile wallet mix, merging the online and offline worlds into true omnichannel commerce.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, mobile wallet, mobile, Consumer Pulse

Harpeth Marketing: Marketing & Sales Advice from Leaders in our Industry, Part 4

Posted on Wed, Jul 22, 2015 @ 10:18 AM

Originally posted by Harpeth Marketing

CMB Base Logo2 300x161This is the fourth of five posts in which we are interviewing noted business owners and leaders from across the Market Research industry to explore how top firms look at and utilize marketing & sales for their businesses.

This week, we talked with Anne Bailey Berman, President and CEO of Chadwick Martin Bailey, based in Boston, Mass.

Anne, tell us a little about your firm.

“We are a data-driven market strategy firm that pairs strong quantitative and qualitative research with advanced analytics. As an AMA Gold Top 50 company with over 70 employees, we’re large enough to tackle the most complex business challenges and small enough to be agile. From the beginning 31 years ago, we believed in integrating information, the value of multiple sources, and the need to focus on decisions to be made. While we remain true to our mission, we also know the world has changed a lot in three decades. New technologies and social forces like big data, mobile, and growing customer-centricity have introduced incredible challenges and opportunities. That’s why we have integrated comprehensive strategic consulting to our offerings—to help executives navigate these changes, frame business decisions, and tell compelling data-driven stories.”

I’ve been saying for years that Market Research is an industry that does not embrace marketing & sales. Do you agree or disagree… and why?

“Gracious! That is correct. For the most part, market research firms are smaller consultancies without sufficient resources to support a real marketing initiative. We built our marketing program to give an outlet, really a “voice” to our talented employees, and it lets us introduce ourselves to a greater audience in a human way—as partners—not as vendors. Sales, on the other hand, tends to be either relationship generated or prescribed by an (think purchasing department) RFP process, or a combination. Unless one is buying a “product”, clients prefer not to buy from a salesperson. Chemistry, trust, and partnership can be assessed during the sales process along with issues relating to market research itself. Clients want to work with the people that “sold” them the project. But remember, our client-side people only have so much sales bandwidth when they also work on client projects. This limits their sales time and provides a growth dilemma. Notably, more market research firms are using processes and metrics to enhance the sales effectiveness of their client-facing people. As an industry, many of us were late to recognize this need; we are there now.”

Anne, your firm is recognized as one that does a good job with marketing & sales. Give us an overview of the kinds of marketing & sales things that you do?

“Thank you. This is nice to hear. Our message is pretty simple—we stress that all organizations have market problems that can be addressed if focused on in the right way. Through marketing, we seek to help our clients focus. Everyone at CMB is urged to write blogs. We conduct webinars. We speak at conferences and meetings. The goal is to introduce ourselves as people who understand companies’ problems and as people who have ideas about how to solve those problems. In terms of sales, we do the same thing. We want to work with clients that we believe we can support.”

Which marketing & sales activities have you found to be the most effective… and why?

“I believe market understanding and then subsequent strategy are key to all market decisions. To me, marketing is the all-encompassing umbrella that focuses on customers and prospects and their journey from awareness to advocacy. Marketing touches the consumer in all communication… be it advertising, PR or personal contact. Sales is the behavioral change element in that journey—the part that seeks to convert prospects to customers or to gain repeat customers. Too often, we silo these as two different functions.”

How is marketing getting done at your firm?

“Marketing is done by each and every member of our staff as they communicate with customers and prospects and as they deliver our services. We do have a three-person marketing team who focus on creating engaging and relevant content, creating dynamic deliverables, and making sure we’re telling the CMB story in a compelling way.”

How about sales?

“We have one dedicated salesperson who works across each of our teams. But, we actually have a seller-doer model in which Account Directors and Executives are the ones who propose the approach to a particular client problem and manage the engagement. They are engaged and available from design to completion. We believe that every one of our employees is essential to our sales effort because it is the passion and involvement that they have with clients that provides the trust that clients want when they assign a project.”

So many firms in our industry seem to use the same words when describing how they’re different. Does your firm have a true point of differentiation… and if so, how did you discover/establish it?

“This is a great question and a big problem. I periodically look at various competitors’ web pages, and you’re correct, many of the same words are used—“insights” and “decision-focused” are a couple of them. That’s no surprise—a decision focus is critical when you’re dealing with clients who have complex challenges, huge opportunities and too much information. Along with our consultative lens, we really are the partners our clients want to have—thoughtful, smart, leading-edge (in analytics as well as how we look at problems), and invested in our clients. It is the experience – not the words – that sets us apart.”

Thanks, Anne… we really appreciate the insights.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, Anne Bailey Berman, marketing, market research, sales

eMarketer: How Fancy Do Consumers Want Their Wearables?

Posted on Tue, Jul 21, 2015 @ 03:46 PM

Originally posted on eMarketer.com

Wearable device awareness is high, but ownership—and purchase intent—remain low. Indeed, May 2015 polling by Altimeter Group found that just 7% of US internet users owned a wearable, and a March 2015 study by DigitasLBi put wearables penetration among internet users worldwide at 17%.

Most Desirable Wearable Device Features According to US Smartphone Owners, April 2015 (% of respondents)

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What could urge consumers to take the plunge? When April 2015 polling by Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB)—which found that six in 10 US smartphone owners were familiar to some extent with wearables—asked about the most desirable features, respondents stuck with three categories: fundamentals, health and point-of-sale payments—in other words, nothing overly fancy.

Basic features including touchscreens, GPS and water resistance were desired most. Consumers have already shown interest in using wearables to track fitness and health, so it comes as little surprise that calorie trackers, pedometers, and heart rate and blood pressure monitors were highly in demand as well.

Nearly four in 10 smartphone owners wanted mobile wallets, too, though all respondents in the pool had used a mobile wallet on their phone in the past six months, so they’re likely more interested in this than the general public. May 2015 polling by Avangate found that 29.4% of US digital buyers were comfortable purchasing products via wearable technology. On the flipside, 35.4% weren’t at all comfortable. And in April 2015 research by PowerReviews, 22% of US smartphone owners were interested in using touchless/one-click payments on wearables while shopping.

However, other research suggests consumers may not know what they want from wearables, so CMB’s results are just one example of in-demand features.

In research released in June 2015, International Data Corporation (IDC) estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 26.4 million in 2014 and forecast they would rise 173.3% this year to 72.1 million. IDC projected that in 2019, global wearables shipments would reach 155.7 million. Meanwhile, in May 2015 research, TECHnalysis Research estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 23 million last year and forecast this would hit 175 million in 2020.

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf

Wearable device awareness is high, but ownership—and purchase intent—remain low. Indeed, May 2015 polling by Altimeter Group found that just 7% of US internet users owned a wearable, and a March 2015 study by DigitasLBi put wearables penetration among internet users worldwide at 17%.

MB, Chadwick Martin Bailey, mobile wallet, Consumer Pulse, wearablesWhat could urge consumers to take the plunge? When April 2015 polling by Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB)—which found that six in 10 US smartphone owners were familiar to some extent with wearables—asked about the most desirable features, respondents stuck with three categories: fundamentals, health and point-of-sale payments—in other words, nothing overly fancy.

Basic features including touchscreens, GPS and water resistance were desired most. Consumers have already shown interest in using wearables to track fitness and health, so it comes as little surprise that calorie trackers, pedometers, and heart rate and blood pressure monitors were highly in demand as well.

Nearly four in 10 smartphone owners wanted mobile wallets, too, though all respondents in the pool had used a mobile wallet on their phone in the past six months, so they’re likely more interested in this than the general public. May 2015 polling by Avangate found that 29.4% of US digital buyers were comfortable purchasing products via wearable technology. On the flipside, 35.4% weren’t at all comfortable. And in April 2015 research by PowerReviews, 22% of US smartphone owners were interested in using touchless/one-click payments on wearables while shopping.

However, other research suggests consumers may not know what they want from wearables, so CMB’s results are just one example of in-demand features.

In research released in June 2015, International Data Corporation (IDC) estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 26.4 million in 2014 and forecast they would rise 173.3% this year to 72.1 million. IDC projected that in 2019, global wearables shipments would reach 155.7 million. Meanwhile, in May 2015 research, TECHnalysis Research estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 23 million last year and forecast this would hit 175 million in 2020.

Wearable device awareness is high, but ownership—and purchase intent—remain low. Indeed, May 2015 polling by Altimeter Group found that just 7% of US internet users owned a wearable, and a March 2015 study by DigitasLBi put wearables penetration among internet users worldwide at 17%.

Most Desirable Wearable Device Features According to US Smartphone Owners, April 2015 (% of respondents)

SHARE

What could urge consumers to take the plunge? When April 2015 polling by Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB)—which found that six in 10 US smartphone owners were familiar to some extent with wearables—asked about the most desirable features, respondents stuck with three categories: fundamentals, health and point-of-sale payments—in other words, nothing overly fancy.

Basic features including touchscreens, GPS and water resistance were desired most. Consumers have already shown interest in using wearables to track fitness and health, so it comes as little surprise that calorie trackers, pedometers, and heart rate and blood pressure monitors were highly in demand as well.

Nearly four in 10 smartphone owners wanted mobile wallets, too, though all respondents in the pool had used a mobile wallet on their phone in the past six months, so they’re likely more interested in this than the general public. May 2015 polling by Avangate found that 29.4% of US digital buyers were comfortable purchasing products via wearable technology. On the flipside, 35.4% weren’t at all comfortable. And in April 2015 research by PowerReviews, 22% of US smartphone owners were interested in using touchless/one-click payments on wearables while shopping.

However, other research suggests consumers may not know what they want from wearables, so CMB’s results are just one example of in-demand features.

In research released in June 2015, International Data Corporation (IDC) estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 26.4 million in 2014 and forecast they would rise 173.3% this year to 72.1 million. IDC projected that in 2019, global wearables shipments would reach 155.7 million. Meanwhile, in May 2015 research, TECHnalysis Research estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 23 million last year and forecast this would hit 175 million in 2020.

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf
Fundamentals as well as health and point-of-sale features are most desirable - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf
Fundamentals as well as health and point-of-sale features are most desirable - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf
Fundamentals as well as health and point-of-sale features are most desirable - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf
Fundamentals as well as health and point-of-sale features are most desirable - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf
Fundamentals as well as health and point-of-sale features are most desirable - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/How-Fancy-Do-Consumers-Want-Their-Wearables/1012756#sthash.FocWjQnD.dpuf

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, wearables, mobile wallet, emarketer, Consumer Pulse

eMarketer: How Fancy Do Consumers Want Their Wearables?

Posted on Tue, Jul 21, 2015 @ 02:46 PM

Oringinally posted by eMarketer

Most Desirable Wearable Device Features According to US Smartphone Owners, April 2015 (% of respondents)

Wearable device awareness is high, but ownership—and purchase intent—remain low. Indeed, May 2015 polling by Altimeter Group found that just 7% of US internet users owned a wearable, and a March 2015 study by DigitasLBi put wearables penetration among internet users worldwide at 17%.

What could urge consumers to take the plunge? When April 2015 polling by Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB)—which found that six in 10 US smartphone owners were familiar to some extent with wearables—asked about the most desirable features, respondents stuck with three categories: fundamentals, health and point-of-sale payments—in other words, nothing overly fancy.

Basic features including touchscreens, GPS and water resistance were desired most. Consumers have already shown interest in using wearables to track fitness and health, so it comes as little surprise that calorie trackers, pedometers, and heart rate and blood pressure monitors were highly in demand as well.

Nearly four in 10 smartphone owners wanted mobile wallets, too, though all respondents in the pool had used a mobile wallet on their phone in the past six months, so they’re likely more interested in this than the general public. May 2015 polling by Avangate found that 29.4% of US digital buyers were comfortable purchasing products via wearable technology. On the flipside, 35.4% weren’t at all comfortable. And in April 2015 research by PowerReviews22% of US smartphone owners were interested in using touchless/one-click payments on wearables while shopping.

However, other research suggests consumers may not know what they want from wearables, so CMB’s results are just one example of in-demand features.

In research released in June 2015, International Data Corporation (IDC) estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 26.4 million in 2014 and forecast they would rise 173.3% this year to 72.1 million. IDC projected that in 2019, global wearables shipments would reach 155.7 million. Meanwhile, in May 2015 research, TECHnalysis Research estimated that wearable device shipments worldwide totaled 23 million last year and forecast this would hit 175 million in 2020.

Tags: mobile research, wearables, mobile wallet, Consumer Pulse

MobileWorldLive.com: Mobile wallet usage nearly doubled since 2013 – survey

Posted on Wed, Jun 24, 2015 @ 11:01 AM

Originally posted on MobileWorldLive.com

A survey by US market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Baily (CMB) found that 15 per cent of respondents used a mobile wallet in the past six months, and an additional 22 per cent anticipate doing so in the coming half year.

That represents a doubling of wallet usage since 2013, said CMB, who partly explain the upward trajectory with another finding: While security remains users’ number one concern, it is less of a barrier than in the past.

Now 62 per cent of respondents say security is the main barrier, down from 73 per cent in 2013. CMB theorises that the “near ubiquity of online shopping (86 per cent have made a purchase from their desktop or laptop in the past 6 months) may be acclimating consumers to perceived security risks like identity theft”.

The survey is also optimistic about how wearables can spur a take-up in mobile payments. “While many consumers don’t yet see the benefit to using their phone at the point of sale, the ability to scan a wearable device, like a smartwatch, at the register may help consumers overcome this convenience barrier,” it said.

Nearly 40 per cent of those “highly likely” to buy a wearable in the coming year want it to come with mobile wallet functionality, the report claims as evidence.

In addition, a majority of likely wearable buyers said that the presence/absence of a mobile wallet on a wearable will have “a major impact” on their purchase decision.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, wearables, mobile wallet, Consumer Pulse

PYMNTS.com: Mobile Wallet Use Surges

Posted on Fri, Jun 19, 2015 @ 09:46 AM

Originally posted on PYMNTS.com

A new study published by market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB) throws another set of data points into the market about mobile wallet usage, growth and adoption.

The study alleges that 2015 is the year that mobile payments will take off in the U.S. as wearables also increase the probability that connected devices, like the Apple Watch, will stoke mobile wallet use.

According to the study, familiarity and usage have doubled since 2013- 15 percent of the respondents have used a mobile wallet in the past 6 months and an additional 22 percent are likely to use it in the coming 6 months. The study also found that while security concerns remain the number one barrier to mobile wallet use, these concerns are slowly declining – 62 percent of respondents list security as the number one barrier, down from 73 percent in 2013.

Yet, the race for consumer preference and the so-called “winner” remains far from being decided. “Our findings reveal that mobile wallet and wearable categories are set to expand rapidly and there is no clear winner in sight just yet,” says Jim Garrity, SVP of Chadwick Martin Bailey’s Financial Services practice.

In a recent op-ed Karen Webster asserts that it’s impossible to define one ‘winner’ who technically has to work across operating systems, shopping channels, browsers and technology platforms. Searches, for instance, that may start on the desktop during the lunch break might end up in a sale via a tablet later that day after the kids are in bed – and all use different operating systems, devices and therefore payments methods.

Usage, the study says, is all about convincing consumers to take the plunge.

“The key to success will be to hammer home messaging around table stakes like benefits and security while simultaneously working to make the technology a natural extension of the user through incentives, alternate uses of wallet, and spend management, faster than competitors,” Says Garrity.

The authors believe that while many consumers don’t yet see the benefit to using their phones at the point of sale, the ability to scan a wearable device, like a smartwatch, at the register may help consumers overcome this barrier.

Nearly 40 percent of those highly likely to buy wearables in the coming year want it to come with mobile wallet functionality. The majority of likely wearable buyers also claim that the presence or absence of a mobile wallet has a major impact on their purchase decision.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, wearables, mobile wallet, Consumer Pulse

NFCWorld.com: Almost one in six US consumers are using mobile wallets

Posted on Thu, Jun 18, 2015 @ 11:12 AM

Originally posted in NFCWorld.com

Almost one in six US consumers (15%) have used a mobile wallet in the past six months, up from 9% in the same period in 2013, and an additional 22% are likely to adopt mobile wallet functionality in the coming six months, a study released by market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey has found.

Some 18% of the 1,716 consumers surveyed for The Mobile Wallet in 2015 and Beyond report said they are “very familiar” with mobile wallets, compared to 8% in 2013, while 44% said they are “somewhat familiar” compared to 42% in 2013 and 37% said they were “unfamiliar,” a decrease from 50% two years previously.

Among mobile wallet users, 61% have used PayPal with an average 88% satisfaction rate, 38% have used Amazon (84% satisfaction), 31% have used Starbucks (93% satisfaction), 31% have used Apple Pay (89% satisfaction) and 31% have used Google Wallet (82% satisfaction).

PayPal is the preferred wallet provider among respondents with 71%, followed by Apple with 55%, Amazon with 49%, Google Wallet with 48% and Microsoft with 34%.

More than one in four (27%) mobile wallet users say they are also “very likely” to switch to other businesses if they offer mobile payment capability, and 18% would increase their business if mobile payment capability was present. Meanwhile, 44% want extra rewards and points when using a mobile wallet, in addition to those they get with a credit or debit card.

A falling majority (63%) said they do not use mobile wallets and have no plans to do so, compared to 71% in 2013. Security was cited as the number one barrier to mobile wallet adoption by 62%, down from 73% in 2013, while 40% said they do not want to pay any fees, 26% say they do not want the store to have their mobile wallet information and 19% say it’s not as convenient as using cash or a credit card.

Furthermore, 15% cite the fact that there is no single payment system across merchants is a barrier to mobile wallet adoption, while 14% believe credit cards have better rewards, 13% don’t know which app is best, 10% say the technology doesn’t always work properly, 9% say it’s not available in the stores they would like to use it and 8% say mobile phone screens are too small.

Nearly 40% of those who are “highly likely” to buy a wearable device in the coming year say they want it to come with mobile wallet functionality with the majority of likely wearable buyers claiming that the presence or absence of a mobile wallet has a major impact on their purchase decision.

“Our findings reveal that mobile wallet and wearable categories are set to expand rapidly and there is no clear winner in sight just yet,” says Jim Garrity, senior vice president of Chadwick Martin Bailey’s financial services practice.

“The key to success will be to hammer home messaging around benefits and security while simultaneously working to make the technology a natural extension of the user through incentives, alternate uses of wallet and spend management, faster than competitors.”

The research also reveals that 13% of Chase and American Express credit cards have been uploaded to a mobile wallet, as well as 14% of credit cards from Visa, 11% from Bank of America, 8% from Capital One and Discover, 9% from MasterCard and 3% from Citibank and Wells Fargo.

Meanwhile, 13% of Visa debit cards have been uploaded to a mobile wallet as well as 14% of debit cards from Bank of America, 7% from Chase, 8% from MasterCard, 6% from Wells Fargo, 5% from Capital One and 3% from Discover and Citibank

BizReport.com: Study highlights consumer behavior in tablet purchase journey

Posted on Wed, Nov 26, 2014 @ 10:52 AM

Originally posted by BizReport.com

While those shopping for a new tablet rely heavily on mobile devices to research and evaluate a purchase, very few go on to make a purchase on a mobile device, according to a new study from market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey.

When Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB) surveyed 2,000 consumers to find out what influenced them during their search for a tablet to purchase, they found that while much of the purchase journey was carried out on a mobile device, just 8% went on to complete their purchase via mobile

"We're seeing that smartphones, in particular, are indeed playing an increasingly important role in the consumer purchase journey for tablets - including when people are inside a physical retail store," according to Chris Neal, VP of the Technology and Telecom Practice at Chadwick Martin Bailey. "Most of this activity is still happening on the mobile web, rather than within any specific mobile application, which has implications for media spending optimization, digital creative, and retail channel management."

The study found that a quarter of tablet purchasers use a mobile device while in-store to compare prices, check online reviews, text a friend for advice or pay with a mobile wallet. However, while in-store, the same number is just as likely to chat with a sales associate.

While the mobile web is used extensively throughout the purchase journey, apps are used infrequently with just 13% using them at all during their path to purchase.

The most influential resource for tablet purchasers are consumer reviews - more so than reviews from experts. However, social media is not used much and just 12% of tablet purchasers consult this medium in their purchase journey.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, tablets, technology, mobile, Path to Purchase, tablet, Consumer Pulse

MobileCommerceDaily.com: 66pc of tablet shoppers leverage mobile during path to purchase

Posted on Wed, Nov 19, 2014 @ 11:24 AM

Originally posted by MobileCommerceDaily.com

Mobile is a key influencer for tablet purchasers during the research and evaluation phase of shopping, but it is rarely used to actually buy tablet devices.

Mobile, social and online factors influence tablet purchasers very differently at separate stages in the purchase journey, according to a new study “The Tablet Path to Purchase: The Mobile, Social and Online Journey” from market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey. Consumer electronics retailers can respond to the data of this study by leveraging customer reviews online and sensational in-store experiences in order to make a sale.

“Brands can benefit from this data by adjusting their marketing spend priorities based on what actually has the greatest reach and impact in the tablet purchase journey,” said Chris Neal, vice president of tech practice at CMB, Boston. “Retailers can benefit by understanding the profile of consumers who typically make tablet purchases from within a retail store, why they buy at specific retailers, versus buying the product online, and how to sway more consumer segments to buy from their bricks-and-mortar retail store versus some other channel.”

Mobile driving in-store
The study, which surveyed 2,000 consumers ages 18 and up who had purchased a tablet in the last 90 days, shows that mobile devices are used by 66 percent of tablet shoppers during their purchase journey, but only 8 percent of tablet purchasers complete their purchase on a mobile device.

In-store mobile activities play an important role.

During the research and evaluation phase, 25 percent of tablet purchasers speak with a retail sales associate. The same number of respondents uses mobile devices while in the retail store to compare prices, check online reviews, text a friend for advice, or pay with a mobile wallet.

According to the study, mobile applications are used infrequently throughout the purchase journey. Although the mobile Web is used extensively, only 13 percent of tablet shoppers use a mobile app during the entire purchase journey.

Social media is also used fairly infrequently during the tablet purchase journey. While the consumer purchase journey is very social in nature, few of the influencers that lead to a purchase actually happen on social media platforms,. Instead, purchasers are influenced by fellow customer reviews and word of mouth reviews from purchasers’ friends and family.

Only 12 percent of buyers use social media during the tablet purchase journey.

Trustworthy opinions
Purchasers view reviews from other consumers to be more important rather than expert reviews. While reviews are one of the most influential resources during the buying process, consumer reviews are used much more commonly than expert reviews in each phase of the purchase journey and are more influential.

While mobile is definitely a factor in the purchasing process, once the journey reaches inside the store, shoppers are entirely interested in retail associates’ knowledge and other physical factors.

Smartphone users will continue to use their devices as a point of research and reference in the forms of contacting friends and family and mobile Web.

The best ways for retailers to make in-store sales in a mobile centric environment is to respond to these habits.

“Tablet shoppers are indeed quite commonly show-rooming when they are in physical retail stores browsing for tablets, and I believe this is a behavior that will only increase in the future,” Mr. Neal said. “Many retailers have already been adapting to this, such as Best Buy matching prices from any vetted or reputable online site for the same make and model if the shopper shows them the price on their smartphone while in the store.

“This has become part of retail sales associates’ training regimen, which is recognizing and effectively reacting to shoppers who are also looking up reviews of a given product on display in the store, doing price comparison look-ups to see if they can buy the same make and model elsewhere, texting friends and family for in-the-moment recommendations or feedback, etc.,” he said.

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, tablets, mobile, Path to Purchase, Consumer Pulse

Hotelmarketing.com: Most Leisure Travelers Make Their Final Decision on a Hotel by Visiting its Website

Posted on Thu, Aug 28, 2014 @ 09:26 AM

Oriniginally posted on Hotelmarketing.com

While reviews on TripAdvisor and OTAs are influential in the final purchase decision, most leisure travelers still want to have a closer look at the hotel by visiting its website, says a new study. The study also finds that few leisure travelers rely on social media when making a hotel booking decision.

A new study of 2,000 consumers: The New Hotel Booking Path to Purchase: The Mobile, Social, and Online Journey from market research and consulting firm Chadwick Martin Bailey (CMB) found that mobile, social, and online factors influence leisure travelers very differently at separate stages in the purchase journey. Additional findings include:

  • Mobile devices play an important role in the initial research phase of hotel planning, but are used sparingly to book hotel stays. Over 60% of travelers used a mobile device - 47% a smartphone - during their hotel purchase journey. But only 6% booked their hotel via a smartphone.
  • Mobile applications are used infrequently throughout the hotel purchase journey. In total, only 6% of shoppers used a mobile app.
  • Consumer reviews trump social media in influencing research and evaluation as well as final decisions. Only 13% of bookers used social media during the purchase journey vs 59% who consulted consumer reviews. 
  • Price comparison sites play an important role even when they are not the final purchase location. Nearly half of travelers (49%) used a price comparison website such as Expedia, Priceline, or Kayak. 36% of those who used one or more of these sites ultimately booked their stay with them.


“There’s no shortage of information available to travelers as they plan and book hotels for their vacations,” says Judy Melanson, SVP of CMB’s Travel and Hospitality practice. “We know their path involves multiple sites and sources of information. The challenge for hotels is to decide how to align their marketing budgets to best intercept potential travelers—delivering desired content on the appropriate device and through the right channels and partners.”

Download the complete survey at Chadwick Martin Bailey (Free registration)

Tags: CMB, chadwick martin bailey, Hotels, hotel, travel, mobile, Path to Purchase, social media, Consumer Pulse