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QRCA 2017 Conference Recap

Posted by Anne Hooper

Wed, Mar 01, 2017

powerofperspective-image.jpgA couple weeks ago I took a hiatus from the Boston winter and flew to sunny Los Angeles for the Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) Annual Conference: The Power of Perspective. For any qualitative researcher interested in learning and connecting with the qual community, this conference is a must

For three intense days, my fellow “quallies” and I were immersed in the latest industry methods, tools, and techniques.  I’m always impressed with QRCA and this year’s theme “The Power of Perspective” didn’t disappoint.  In fact, it was one of best conferences I’ve been to in years!  I came home feeling renewed, refreshed, and reenergized with plenty of new tools for my qualitative toolbox.

While I learned a lot during those three days, a few things really stood out to me. Some of my learnings will make me a better practitioner while others went as far as making me cry.  (Yep, you read that right.  I cried.  But I swear I didn’t make that ugly cry face!). 

So here are some of my most memorable takeaways from QRCA 2017:

Theater and qualitative research are more alike than different. Theater is storytelling—stories that reflect our society, help us empathize with others, bring to life historical figures and moments, and have the power to change our perspectives. This is similar to what we do in qualitative research. We are storytellers, truth-seekers, and opinion shapers. We strive to connect with others in a meaningful way, to tell their stories, and to ultimately affect change.

Just as the protagonist is vital to a theater performance, the participant (our “protagonist”) is vital to the market research story. For our story to be successful we must fully understand them—who they are, what they want, and their situation.

Technology continues to shape qual. As new technology transforms society, it’s also reshaping the way qualitative researchers collect and analyze data. In one session, speaker Pam Goldfarb Liss spoke about the impact of new technology—for example, using virtual reality like video screens and specially outfitted wearables to let participants interact with a fabricated environment. Qual researchers are also using facial recognition software, augmented reality (i.e., virtual shop-alongs and package testing), and artificial intelligence in their work. With new technology emerging almost daily, it’s important to continue to think of ways it can help improve our work for the benefit of our participants and clients.  

Listening is powerful. Benjamin Mathes, founder of Urban Confessional*, the LA-born free listening project, lead an interactive session on listening. Urban Confessional is grounded in the belief that people just need someone to talk to and recruits volunteers to stand in public spaces and offer to lend an ear to anyone who wants to unload something.

Armed with a simple cardboard sign reading “Free Listening,” a few quallies and I hit the streets of LA to give Urban Confessional a try. Was I scared? A bit. Excited? Totally. Ready? Not at all… but what an experience! What I learned not only applies to life, but there is a direct connection to what makes for an effective qualitative researcher:

  • What others hear is more important than what we say
  • True listening is allowing someone to be completely themselves in our presence
  • Respecting silence can be really tough, but it’s important

My QRCA experience culminated in a session lead by John Boettner, Chief Enchantment Officer at Teen Press Inc. John, along with two teen journalists, spoke about the beauty and challenges of humanity and how they apply to the work that we do.

Whether you’re a qualitative researcher or not, you’ll be moved by Teen Press, maybe even to tears. Here are my key takeaways that will stay with me forever: 

  • When someone is telling their truths, things can go where you never expected them to. Embrace it and let it happen.
  • Listen to people with sincerity and a genuine desire to connect with them—when you do this, something special happens
  • Other peoples’ perspectives and stories better help us understand each other as human beings. We need to do this now more than ever.
  • Everyone has a story to share and sometimes just wants to be listened to. Be an active listener for them.
  • Embrace awkwardness, especially silence. You might learn a thing or two from it.

I could go on and on about the great things I learned at QRCA 2017, but you’d be here a while. This is just the tip of the iceberg of a conference full of tips, tricks, tools, and special moments.

I’m putting all the valuable insight I learned at QRCA to practice and am already excited for next year’s conference. See you in Phoenix for QRCA 2018!

 As CMB’s Qualitative Research Director and mom of a 15 year old daughter, Anne is thankful for teachers like John Boettner and the millions of other teachers out there that make a difference in our kids lives’ every day.  And BTW:  she’s finally stopped crying and is officially back to work.

 *Disclaimer: If you aren’t familiar with Urban Confessional, I highly recommend checking it out because it’s relevant to all of us human beings.

 

Topics: qualitative research, conference recap

But first... how do you feel?

Posted by Lori Vellucci

Wed, Dec 14, 2016

EMPACT 12.14-2.jpg

How does your brand make consumers feel?  It’s a tough but important question and the answer will often vary between customers and prospects or between segments within your customer base.  Understanding and influencing consumers’ emotions is crucial for building a loyal customer base; and scientific research, market research, and conventional wisdom all suggest that to attract and engage consumers, emotions are a key piece of the puzzle. 

CMB designed EMPACTSM, a proprietary quantitative approach to understanding how a brand, product, touchpoint, or experience should make a consumer feel in order to drive their behaviors.  Measuring valence (how bad or good) and activation (low to high energy) across basic emotions (e.g., happy, sad, etc.), social and self-conscious emotions (e.g., pride, embarrassment, nostalgia, etc.) and other relevant feelings and mental states (e.g., social connection, cognitive ease, etc.), EMPACT has proved to be a practical, comprehensive, and robust tool.  The key insights around emotions emerge which can then drive communication to elicit the desired emotions and drive consumer behavior.  But while EMPACT has been used extensively as a quantitative tool, it is also an important component when conducting qualitative research.

In order to achieve the most bang for the buck with qualitative research, every researcher knows that having the right people in the room (or in front of the video-enabled IDI) is a critical first step.  You screen for demographics and behaviors and sometimes attitudes, but have you considered emotions?  Ensuring that you recruit respondents who feel a specific way when considering your brand or product is critical to being able to glean the most insight from qualitative work. (Tweet this!)  Applying an emotional qualifier to respondents allows us to ensure that we are talking to respondents who are in the best position to provide the specific types of insights we’re looking for. 

For example, CMB has a client who learned from a segmentation study which incorporated EMPACT that their brand over-indexed for eliciting certain emotions that tended to drive consumers away from brands within their industry.  The firm had a desire to craft targeted communications to mitigate these negative emotions among this specific strategic consumer segment.  As a first step in testing their marketing message and imagery, focus groups were conducted. 

In addition to using the segmentation algorithm to ensure we had the correct consumer segment in the room, we also included EMPACTscreening to be sure the respondents selected felt the emotions that we wanted to address with new messaging.  In this way, we were able to elicit insights directly related to how well the new messaging worked in mitigating the negative emotions.  Of course we tested the messaging among broader groups as well, but being able to identify and isolate respondents whose emotions we most wish to improve ensured development of great advertising that will move the emotion needle and motivate consumers to try and to love the brand.

Want to learn more about EMPACT? View our webinar by clicking the link below:

Learn More About EMPACT℠

Lori Vellucci is an Account Director at CMB.  She spends her free time purchasing ill-fated penny stocks and learning about mobile payment solutions from her Gen Z daughters.

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, EMPACT, quantitative research

Why Researchers Should Consider Hybrid Methods

Posted by Becky Schaefer

Fri, Dec 09, 2016

As market researchers we’re always challenging ourselves to provide deeper, more accurate insights for our clients. Throughout my career I’ve witnessed an increased dedication to uncovering better results by integrating traditional quantitative and qualitative methodologies to maximize insights within shorter time frames.Qualitative.jpg

Market research has traditionally been divided into quantitative and qualitative methodologies. But more and more researchers are combining elements of each – creating a hybrid methodology, if you will – to paint a clearer picture of the data for clients. [Tweet this!]

Quantitative research is focused on uncovering objective measurements via statistical analysis. In practice, quant market research studies generally entail questionnaire development, programming, data collection, analysis, and results, and can usually be completed within a few weeks (depending on the scope of the research).  Quant studies usually have larger sample sizes and are structured and setup to quantify data on respondents’ attitudes, opinions, and behaviors.

Qualitative research is exploratory and aims to uncover respondents’ underlying reasons, beliefs and motivations. Qualitative is descriptive, and studies may rely on projective techniques and principles of behavioral psychology to probe deeper than initial responses might allow. 

While both quantitative and qualitative research have their respective merits, market research is evolving and blurring the lines between the two.  At CMB we understand each client has different goals and sometimes it’s beneficial to apply these hybrid techniques.

 For example two approaches I like to recommend are:

  • Video open-ends Traditional quantitative open-ends ask respondents to complete open-ended questions by to entering a text response. Open-ends give respondents the freedom to answer questions in their own words versus selecting from a list of pre-determined responses. While open-ends are still considered to be a viable technique, market researchers are now throwing video into the mix. Instead of writing down their responses, respondents can record themselves on video. The obvious advantage to video is that it facilitates a more genuine, candid response while researchers are able see respondents’ emotions “face to face.” This is a twist on a traditional quantitative research that has the potential to garner deeper, more meaningful respondent insight.
  • In-depth/moderated chats let researchers dig deeper and connect with respondents within the paradigm of a traditional quantitative study. In these short discussions respondents can explain to researchers why they made a specific selection on a survey. In-depth/moderated chats can help contextualize a traditional quantitative survey – providing researchers (and clients) with a combination of both quantitative and qualitative insights.

As insights professionals we strive to offer critical insights that help our clients and partners answer their biggest business questions. More and more often the best way to achieve the best results is to put tradition aside and combine both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

Rebecca is part of the field services team at CMB, and she is excited to celebrate her favorite time of year with her family and friends.  

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, quantitative research

The Elephant, the Donkey, and the Qualitative Researcher: The Moderator in Market Research and Politics

Posted by Kelsey Segaloff

Wed, Nov 23, 2016

capitol-32310_1280.pngAmericans have a lot to reckon with in the wake of the recent vote. You’re forgiven if analyzing the role of the presidential debate moderator isn’t high on your list. Still, for those of us in the qualitative market research business, there were professional lessons to be learned from the reactions to moderators Lester Holt (NBC), Martha Raddatz (ABC), Anderson Cooper (CNN), and Chris Wallace (Fox). Each moderator took their own approach and each was met with criticism and praise.

As CMB’s qualitative research associate and a moderator-in-training, I noticed parallels to the role of the moderator in the political and market research space. My thoughts:

 The moderator as unbiased

"Lester [Holt] is a Democrat. It’s a phony system. They are all Democrats.” – Donald Trump, President-Elect

Concerns regarding whether or not the debate moderators were unbiased arose throughout the primaries and presidential debates. Moderators were criticized for techniques like asking questions that were deemed “too difficult,” going after a single candidate, and not adequately pressing other candidates.  For example, critics called NBC’S Matt Lauer biased during the Commander-in-Chief forum. Some felt Lauer hindered Hillary Clinton’s performance by asking tougher questions than those asked of Donald Trump, interrupting Clinton, and not letting her speak on other issues the same way he allowed Donald Trump to.

In qualitative market research, every moderator will experience some bias from time to time, but it’s important to mitigate bias in order to maintain the integrity of the study. In my own qualitative experience, the moderator establishes that they are unbiased by opening each focus group by explaining that they are independent from the topic of discussion and/or client, and therein are not looking for the participants to answer a certain way.

Qualitative research moderators can also avoid bias by not asking leading questions, monitoring their own facial expressions and body language, and giving each participant an equal opportunity to speak. Like during a political debate, preventing bias is imperative in qualitative work because biases can skew the results of a study the same way the voting populace fears bias could skew the perceived performance of a candidate.

 The moderator as fact-checker

“It has not traditionally been the role of the moderator to engage in a lot of fact-checking.” – Alan Schroeder, professor of Journalism at Northeastern University

Throughout the 2016 election moderators were criticized for either fact-checking too much or not fact-checking the candidates enough. Talk about a Catch-22.

In qualitative moderating, fact-checking is dependent on the insights we are looking to achieve for a particular study. For example, I just finished traveling across the country with CMB’s Director of Qualitative, Anne Hooper, for focus groups. In each group, Anne asked participants what they knew about the product we were researching. Anne noted every response (accurate or inaccurate), as it was critical we understood the participants’ perceptions of the product. After the participants shared their thoughts, Anne gave them an accurate product description to clarify any false impressions because for the remainder of the conversation it was critical the respondents had the correct understanding of the product.

For the case of qualitative research, Anne demonstrated how fact-checking (or not fact-checking) can be used for insights. There’s no “one right way” to do it; it depends on your research goals.  

 The moderator as timekeeper

“Basically, you're there as a timekeeper, but you're not a participant.” – Chris Wallace, Television Anchor and Political Commentator for Fox News

Presidential debate moderators frequently interjected (or at least tried to) when candidates ran over their allotted time in order to stay on track and ensure each candidate had equal speaking time. Focus group moderators have the same responsibility. As a qualitative moderator-in-training, I’m learning the importance of playing timekeeper – to be respectful of the participants’ time and allow for equal participation.  I must also remember to cover all topics in the discussion guide. Whether you’re acting as a timekeeper in market research or political debates, it’s as much about the audience of voters or clients as it is about the participants (candidates or study respondents).  

The study’s desired insights will dictate the role of the moderator. Depending on your (or your client’s) goals, bias, fact-checking, and time-keeping could play an important part in how you moderate. But ultimately whether your client is a business or the American voting populace, the fundamental role of the moderator remains largely the same: to provide the client with the insights needed to make an informed decision.

Kelsey is a Qualitative Research Associate. She co-chairs the New England chapter of the QRCA, and recently received a QRCA Young Professionals Grant!

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, Election

CMB Conference Recap: MRA's Corporate Researchers Conference

Posted by Kathy Ofsthun

Fri, Sep 30, 2016

It’s been less than 48 hours after leaving the MRA’s Corporate Researchers Conference (CRC) 2016 in San Francisco and I’ve finally had a moment to reflect.   

Three topics dominated this year: Innovation, Emotion, and Qualitative and Hybrid methods.  If you created a word cloud from the sessions and keynotes, these words would pop, along with actionability, risk taking and impact.

Word_Cloud_crc.png

INNOVATION: There’s a growing intersection between innovation and market research—the need for facilitation and moderation is expanding at the same time as more and more brands wake up to the benefits of co-creation with customers.  Key takeaway: Researchers with foresight and adaptability can contribute at the fuzzy front end and not just after products are conceived of and developed.

EMOTION: Emotional measurement and neuroscience continue to be hot topics, and CRC was no exception. How do you get beyond the rational to understand the complex reasons customers make choices?  What is the science behind emotions and how can we leverage our knowledge of social psychology and neuroscience?

QUAL & HYBRID METHODS: Seven separate sessions were devoted to ways in which qualitative research was a critical addition to quantitative findings and to storytelling.  Methods such as observation, in-home (in bathroom!) ethnography, online communities and a Quant + Qual method used by eBay brought faster and better insights.

Other themes and learnings included: observe more (93% of communication is non-verbal), be prescriptive not just descriptive, walk/hydrate/power nap/meditate, think creation vs curation, design thinking, improv and that old standby storytelling. 

Along with some interesting conversation, attendees heard some big industry news—the MRA and CASRO merger. As of January 2017, MRA+CASRO will now be the “Insights Association”.  Most members favor the merger and look forward to one cohesive professional organization.  It makes sense to me too, and I thank those who surely worked tirelessly to make this happen. I just wonder about the name.  After all of the talk of “actioning” at the conference (and in our daily work), I’d like to see the name reflect more than just insights—it  feels limiting--stopping short of the more important “impact”.  I would like to be associated with the result in addition to the insight.  Let me know if you agree or disagree. 

Kathy is CMB’s new VP of Qualitative Strategy + Insights.  She loves uncovering insights from customers across the globe and lived in Shanghai for 8 months doing just that!  If you missed her at CRC, you can catch up with at TMRE or send her a shout @ShopperMRX.

 

Topics: qualitative research, EMPACT, emotional measurement, conference recap, growth and innovation

CMB Welcomes Kathy Ofsthun as Head of Expanding Qualitative Strategy + Insights Practice

Posted by Megan McManaman

Fri, Sep 16, 2016

We're excited to announce that Kathy Ofsthun has recently returned to CMB as VP of Qualitative Kathy_final_casual_1_of_1-2.pngStrategy + Insights after spending almost 5 years at C Space as VP of Client Services. Kathy is back to head up CMB’s expanding Qualitative practice—growing clients’ businesses by bringing them closer to their customers.

Kathy  brings a wealth of experience and knowledge in qualitative methods, qual/quant synthesis, and creating connections and strategic partnerships. Her deep research expertise was developed through two decades of work with multinational companies, including a year in Shanghai managing the C Space APAC office. Her work has focused on topics as varied as New Product Development, Shopper Insights, Packaging, Brand Positioning, and Segmentation.

 "I’m thrilled to rejoin CMB at this exciting time," Kathy says. "As consumers move into the driver's seat, marketers and innovators need and want to be closer to their customers, understanding who they are, hearing their needs and incorporating their ideas. By including customers in co-creation of new products, communications development and more, brands can either fail faster or adapt and succeed. I look forward to helping clients leverage the voice of the consumer in order to achieve growth.”

Kathy will be headed to MRA's CRC in San Francisco next week, give us a ring, email us, or stop by booth 407 to say hello!

Are you going to CRC and want to get the most out of it? Check out Julie Kurd's blog:  How To Not Flunk the MRA Corporate Researchers Conference

Topics: strategy consulting, qualitative research, Kathy Ofsthun

Can Facial Recognition Revolutionize Qualitative?

Posted by Will Buxton

Wed, Aug 03, 2016

Full disclosure: I’m an Android and Google loyalist, but please don’t hold that against me or the rest of my fellow Android users, who, by the way, comprise 58% of the smartphone market share in the United States. As a result of my loyalty, I’m always intrigued by Google’s new hardware and software advancements, which are always positioned in a way that leads me to believe they will make my life easier. Some of the innovations over the years have in fact lived up to the hype, such as Google Now, Google Drive, and even Google Fusion, while others such as Google Buzz and Google Wave have not.

As a researcher, last year’s launch of Google Photos caught my eye. Essentially, Google
Photos now utilizes facial recognition software to group or bunch your photos based on people in them, scenery (i.e., beaches and Google_Photos_icon.svg-1.pngmountains) and even events (i.e., weddings and holidays). To activate the facial recognition feature, all you have to do is tag one photo with an individual’s name and all other photos with that person will be compiled into a searchable collection. Google uses visual cues within the photos and geotagging to create other searchable collections. While these features might not seem extraordinary—I can see who was the most frequent star of my photos (my enormous cat) or where I most commonly take photos (honeymoon sans enormous cat)—I began to imagine the possible impact these features could have on the market research industry.

Visual ethnographies are one of many qualitative research options we offer at CMB. This is a rich form of observation, and, for some companies, it can be cost prohibitive in nature, especially ones focused on a “cost-per-complete.” But, what if there was a way to remove some of the heavy lifting of a customer journey ethnography by quantifying some of the shopping experience using technology that could track date/time, location, shopping layout, products viewed, order in which products are viewed, and so on, all through recognition software? Would the reduction in hours, travel, and analysis be able to offset the technological costs of these improvements?

Market research, and, in particular, qualitative research have always been a combination of art and science, and to expect any technological advancement to adequately perform any cogent analyses is a bit premature and perhaps too reminiscent of The Minority Report. (I don’t think it worked out well). But the promise of these powerful tools makes it an exciting time to  be a qualitative researcher!

Will Buxton is a Project Manager on the Financial Services team. He enjoys finding humor in everyday tasks, being taken seriously, and his enormous cat.

Learn more about how our dedicated Qualitative practice helps brands Explore, Listen, & Engage.

 

 

 

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, mobile, storytelling, customer journey

Move Over Cupid: A Qualitative Researcher’s Guide to Valentine’s Day

Posted by Eliza Novick

Tue, Feb 09, 2016

eliza_blog_image.pngAs Valentine’s Day ticks closer, I’m reminded of my best and worst dates over the years. At best, I’ve enjoyed rosé, cheese, and interesting conversations; at worst, I had a beer spilled on me and endured lots of awkward pauses. Through all the ups and downs, I’ve perfected a few tricks that can help make a date a great success and avoid your typical first date pitfalls. Best of all, these are tricks that I can apply to my work as a qualitative researcher!

Moderating a focus group is kind of like going on a blind date with eight people at once while your boss watches. Yes, it can be awkward, but it’s critical that respondents really connect with the moderator to ensure that our clients get reliable findings. With that in mind, here are my top three tips for making it through a first date and for wow-ing clients by getting the most out of your qualitative research:

  1. Ask open-ended questions: Nobody likes stilted conversation, but sometimes it can feel hard to avoid. Rather than asking close-ended questions that end in one-word answers, try asking people to describe an experience. “What kind of things have you been cooking recently?” tends to get a lot more traction than, “Do you like to cook?” Likewise, “Tell me about a time you paid for an unanticipated medical expense” can take you (and your clients) much further than “Have you ever had an unanticipated medical expense?” Putting the emphasis on sharing a story encourages people to give detailed responses and speak genuinely about their interests and experiences.
  2. Don’t try to cover too much ground: Meeting new people can be overwhelming—there’s a lot to digest. So, I’ve found that it’s best to keep the conversation simple. Unlike the unfortunate fellow who asked me rapid-fire questions for two hours over drinks, try asking follow-up questions on one topic. This lets you get to know someone better and discover interesting details that you wouldn’t uncover if you were speeding through topics. It also works in qualitative since your respondents are coming into the conversation with virtually no context. They weren’t privy to the hours of client calls, discussion guide revisions, and marketing materials like the research team was. While it’s tempting to cram as much content as possible into the discussion guide, nine times out of ten, clients find more value in clear, detailed findings than high-level, scattered anecdotes. Besides, speeding through different topics makes it difficult to identify patterns. So, do everyone a favor—slow down, and see where the conversation takes you.
  3. Trust your gut: If something doesn’t seem right, trust yourself. If you’re on a date and things aren’t going well, it’s ok to leave early. Likewise, if your carefully laid research plans are not panning out as you had planned, it’s ok to take a different route. Try phrasing a question a different way. Or, if you have a sense that someone in the group disagrees with a point but is too shy to say so, ask them if they’ve got anything they’d like to share. Not only will this show your respondents that you’re listening and care about what they have to say, it will also elicit more honest responses that lead to better findings (and happy clients).

Qualitative research, like dating, is really about connecting with people—we get the best results when respondents feel they can relate to us researchers on a personal level. So, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there! Take your time, listen to the data you’re getting, and trust yourself. Easy!

Eliza is a qualitative researcher at CMB. In addition to applying her dating life to her work, she likes to be outside, read books, and cook. 

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Topics: qualitative research, research design

Embracing Mobile Market Research

Posted by Brian Jones

Thu, Jul 23, 2015

Who are the mobile consumers?

mobile research, cmbLet’s get this straight: I am not addicted to my smartphone. Unlike so many of my fellow train commuters who stare zombie-eyed into their small screens, I am not immersed in a personal relationship with pixels. I have an e-Reader for that. But, my smartphone IS my lifeline.I’ve come to depend exclusively on my phone to keep me on-time and on-schedule, to entertain me (when not using my e-Reader), to stay in touch with family and friends, and to keep up-to-date with my work email. It’s my primary source for directions, weather, news, photography, messaging, banking, and a regular source for payment, shopping, and ticketing/reservations. I haven’t purchased a PC in nearly a decade, and I don’t have a landline. I also use my smartphone to take market research questionnaires, and I am far from alone. 

Data around smartphone usage aligns with my personal experience. In a recent CMB online study of U.S. consumers, optimized for mobile devices, 1 in 6 Millennials completed the questionnaire on a smartphone. Other studies report similar results. This example illustrates the issue with representativeness. Major panel vendors are seeing over half of Millennials joining their panels via a mobile device. 

mobile research, cmb

How do we adapt?

Much has been hypothesized about the future of market research under the new paradigm of mobile commerce, big data, and cloud services. New technologies and industry convergence (not just mobile) have brought sweeping changes in consumer behaviors, and market researchers must adapt.

A key component of successful adaptation will be greater integration of primary market research with other data streams. The promise of passive or observational data is captivating, but it is largely still in the formative stages. (For more on passive data, check out our recent webinar.) We still need and will likely always need active “please tell me” research. The shift from phone to online data collection has quickly been replaced with the urgency of a shift to mobile data collection (or at least device agnostic interviewing). Our industry has lagged behind because the consumer experience has become so personalized and the trust/value equation for tapping into their experiences is challenging. Tackling mobile market research with tactical solutions is a necessary step in this transition.

What should we do about it?  

  1. Understand your current audience. Researchers need to determine how important mobile data collection is to the business decision and decide how to treat mobile respondents. You can have all respondents use a mobile device, have some use a mobile device, or have mobile device respondents excluded. There are criteria and considerations for each of these, and there are also considerations for the expected mix of feature phones, smartphones, tablets, and PCs. The audience will determine the source of sample and representation that must be factored into the study design. Ultimately, this has a huge impact on the validity and reliability of the data. Respondent invitations need to include any limitations for devices not suitable for a particular survey.
  2. Design for mobile. If mobile participation is important, researchers should use a mobile first questionnaire design. Mobile optimized or mobile friendly surveys typically need to be shorter in length, use concise language, avoid complex grids and answering mechanisms, and have fewer answer options, so they can be supported on a small screen and keep respondents focused on the activity. In some cases,questionnaire modularization or data stitching can be used to help adhere to mobile design standards.
  3. Test for mobile. All questions, images, etc. need to display on a variety of screen sizes and within the bandwidth capacity of the devices that are being used. Android and iOS device accommodation covers most users. If app based surveys are being used, researchers need to ensure that the latest versions can be downloaded and are bug-free. 
  4. Apply data protection and privacy standards. Mobile market research comes with a unique set of conditions and challenges that impact how information is collected, protected, and secured. Research quality and ethical guidelines specific to mobile market research have been published by CASRO, ESOMAR, the MMRA (Mobile Marketing Research Association), and others.
  5. Implement Mobile Qualitative. The barriers are lower, and researchers can leverage the unique capabilities of mobile devices quite effectively with qualitative research. Most importantly, willing participants are mobile, which makes in-the-moment research possible. Mobile qualitative is also a great gateway to explore what’s possible for mobile quantitative studies. See my colleague Anne Hooper’s blog for more on the future of qualitative methodologies.
  6. Promote Research-on-Research. Experts need to conduct and publish additional research-on-research studies that advance understanding of how to treat mobile respondents and utilize passive data, location tracking, and other capabilities that mobile devices provide. We also need stronger evidence of what works and what doesn’t work in execution of multi-mode and mobile-only studies across different demographics, in B2B studies, and within different countries.

But perhaps the most important thing to remember is that this is just a start. Market researchers and other insight professionals must evolve from data providers to become integrated strategic partners—harnessing technology (not just mobile) to industry expertise to focus on decision-making, risk reduction, and growth.

Brian is a Senior Project Manager for Chadwick Martin Bailey, the photographer of the image in this post, and an 82 percenter—he is one of the 82% of mobile phone owners whose phone is with them always or most of the time. 

Watch our recent webinar that discusses the results of our self-funded Consumer Pulse study on the future of the mobile wallet. 

Watch Here!

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, mobile, research design

Qualitative Research Isn't Dying—It's Evolving

Posted by Anne Hooper

Wed, May 06, 2015

qualitative research, anne hooperBack in 2005, Malcolm Gladwell told us that focus groups are dead. Just last November, Jim Bryson, CEO of 20/20 Research, questioned whether qualitative research was thriving or dying: If we take a narrow, more traditional view that qualitative is defined by the methods of face-to-face focus groups or interviews, particularly those held in a qualitative facility, then the case can be easily made that qualitative is dying.”

To all of this, I say: wait, what?! Qualitative is dying? I refused to believe it, so I embarked on a journey to explore where qualitative has been, and more importantly, where it’s going. During my research, I found plenty of evidence to support the fact that qualitative is not, in fact, dying. Great news, right? (Especially for me, because if it were true, I just might be out of a job I love.)I took a look at the fall 2014 Greenbook Research Industry Trends (GRIT) Report and focused on the data from Q1-Q2 of 2013 and Q1-Q2 2014. In this data, I learned:

  • The use of traditional in-person focus groups increased from 60% (Q1-Q2 2013) to 70% (Q1-Q2 2014).
  • Within the same time period, the use of in-person, in-depth interviews increased from 45% to 53%.
  • Interviews and groups using online communities increased from 21% to 24%.
  • The use of mobile qual (e.g., diaries, image uploads) increased from 18% to 24%.

Yes, it’s important to note that not all qualitative methodologies saw an increase in usage within this timeframe. In fact, there was a decrease in the usage of telephone IDIs, in-store shopping/observations, bulletin board studies, both chat-based and webcam-based online focus groups, and telephone focus groups.  All this notwithstanding, I think it’s fair to say that qualitative is still very much alive and well.

So why do people keep talking about qualitative dying? We can’t deny that there are a number of factors that affect how and when we use qualitative methodologies today (technology, access to big data, and text analytics are a few). But, this doesn’t mean qualitative is disappearing as a discipline. Qualitative is evolving at a rapid pace and feels more relevant than ever. Sure, we need to keep up with client demands for faster and cheaper research, but there will always be a need for the human mind (i.e., a qualitative expert) to analyze and synthesize the data to provide meaning and context behind the way people think and behave—and that is where actionable insights are born.   

Now that we know qualitative really isn’t dying, what does 2015 (and beyond) hold for us? The future is about truly integrated research—in which qualitative and quantitative are consistently, thoughtfully, and purposefully used together to provide well-rounded, actionable insights. We’re poised to do exactly that with our dedicated analytics team and network of expert industry qualitative partners. By using two equally important disciplines that are both alive and well, we can provide our clients critical insights they can really use. Far from killing off qualitative insights, technology and an evolving marketplace are helping make qualitative insights even stronger.

Anne Hooper is the Qualitative Research Director at CMB. After recently finding out that her 13 year old daughter did a quantitative assessment of her Jazz Band’s upcoming Disney trip itinerary, she’s determined that an intervention may be in order.

Topics: methodology, qualitative research