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Deconstructing the Customer Experience: What's in Your Toolkit?

Posted by Jennifer von Briesen

Wed, Sep 25, 2013

Disassembled rubix 1More and more companies are focusing on trying to better understand and improve their customers’ experiences. Some want to become more customer-centric. Some see this as an effective path to competitive differentiation. While others, challenging traditional assumptions (e.g., Experience Co-creation, originated by my former boss, Francis Gouillart, and his colleagues Prof. Venkat Ramaswamy and the late C.K. Prahalad), are applying new strategic thinking about value creation. Decision-makers in these firms are starting to recognize that every single interaction and experience a customer has with the company (and its ecosystem partners) may either build or destroy customer value and loyalty over time.

While companies traditionally measure customer value based on revenues, share of wallet, cost to serve, retention, NPS, profitability, lifetime value etc., we now have more and better tools for deconstructing the customer experience and understanding the components driving customer and company interaction value at the activity/experience level. To really understand the value drivers in the customer experience, firms need to simultaneously look holistically, go deep in a few key focus areas, and use a multi-method approach.

Here’s an arsenal of tools and methods that are great to have in your toolkit for building customer experience insight:

Qualitative tools

  • Journey mapping methods and tools

  • In-the-moment, customer activity-based tools

    • Voice capture exercises (either using mobile phones or landlines) where customers can call in and answer a set of questions related to whatever they are doing in the moment.

    • Use mobile devices and online platforms to upload visuals, audio and/or video to answer questions, (e.g., as you are filling out your enrollment paperwork, take a moment to take a quick—less than 10 second video, to share your thoughts on what you are experiencing).

  • Customer diaries

    • E.g., use mobile devices as a visual diary or to complete a number of activities

  • Observation tools

    • Live or virtual tools (e.g., watch/videotape in-person or online experiences, either live or after the fact)

    • On-site customer visits: companies I’ve worked with often like to join customers doing activities in their own environments and situational contexts. Beyond basic observation, company employees can dialogue with customers during the activities/experiences to gain immediate feedback and richer understanding.

  • Interviews and qualitative surveys

  • Online discussion boards

  • Online or in-person focus groups

Quantitative tools

  • Quantitative surveys/research tools (too many to list in a blog post)

  • Internal tracking tools

    • Online tools for tracking behavior metrics (e.g., landing pages/clicks/page views/time on pages, etc.) for key interactions/experience stages. This enables ongoing data-mining, research and analysis.

    • Service/support data analysis (e.g., analyze call center data on inbound calls and online support queries for interaction types, stages, periods, etc. to look for FAQs, problems, etc.).

What tools are you using to better understand and improve the customer experience? What tools are in your toolkit?  Are you taking advantage of all the new tools available?

Jennifer is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group. She recently received the 2013 “Member of the Year” award by the Association for Strategic Planning (ASP), the preeminent professional association for those engaged in strategic thinking, planning and action.

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, methodology, qualitative research, quantitative research, customer experience and loyalty

South Street Strategy Guest Blog: Co-creation at LEGO with Friends

Posted by Jennifer von Briesen

Thu, Aug 15, 2013

LEGO Friends Olivias WorkshopJust over a year ago, leading toy maker the LEGO Group launched its new line of blocks and figures for girls called LEGO Friends in key global markets in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. It is one of the most successful launches in the company’s history and has already generated twice as much business as expected.The story of Friends started long before the 2012 launch, and deserves a full-length case study; for now I’m excited to share a little of what I learned from meeting and listening to Laura Post, Senior Director, Strategic Planning and Insights, for LEGO in the U.S., when she talked about LEGO Friends at the IE Group’s Women in Strategy Summit in New York City a few months ago.

Laura attributed much of the success of the launch to a shift to a customer co-creation approach, and a willingness to really observe and listen to customers and to engage them in co-design of the products. The LEGO Group had tried for over two decades to expand its appeal with girls with little success. Barriers included lack of company focus and support, core products geared to boys ages 5-9, and products designed with strict adherence to internal ‘sacred cow’ beliefs about what mini figures should be and look like. LEGO was also in serious turnaround mode in 2003-2004 after straying too far from its core.

One of the things that LEGO executives realized needed to change was that employees needed to be empowered to make customer-focused decisions. Consumer insights are now core to LEGO’s strategy. As evidence of this shift, according to Laura, the company spent four years and conducted 13 major studies researching customer needs and wants related to Friends. It directly tested products with 3,500 girls and moms, and once a month, girls were brought in to co-create products with LEGO’s designers and researchers.

It was through this focused effort and investment that LEGO learned that the majority of young girls around the world prefer to play with building toys and figures that look very realistic, have vivid colors (especially pink and purple), and that have different personalities that increase the emotional connection. The traditional old mini figures with generic facial expressions just wouldn’t do. As a result, LEGO invented the Friends mini-dolls, each with their own names, interests, and favorite things and places (see Olivia and her invention workshop graphic).

This co-creation story is only one example of what the LEGO Group is doing in this space. There are many, many more examples of how co-creation is changing business for the better. As a big fan of the co-creation approach, I hope to tell more stories on the use of this customer centric methodology at Lego and elsewhere. Watch this space.

Jennifer is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group. She recently received the 2013 “Member of the Year” award by the Association for Strategic Planning (ASP), the preeminent professional association for those engaged in strategic thinking, planning and action.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin Bailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

Join Tauck's Jeremy Palmer, CMB's Judy Melanson and South Street Strategy Group's Mark Carr on September 12th at noon for a webinar: Focused Innovation: Creating New Value for a Legacy Brand Focused Innovation: Creating New Value for a Legacy Brand

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, product development, growth and innovation

South Street Strategy Guest Blog: Healthcare Reform: Who's Looking out for the Small Guy?

Posted by Rachel Corn

Tue, Jul 30, 2013

 

stethoscopeIn early 2012 we did some research on healthcare reform predictions. At the time, there was a pretty strong consensus that large groups, most of which were already insured, would experience little impact. The uncertainty lay around small businesses (<100 employees) offer rates: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation predicted pretty much neutral effect, but RAND predicted an overall increase in offerings. So where do we stand now?We have found most analysts are pretty shy when it comes to forecasting new numbers. For the overall market (all sizes) the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans (IFEBP) reports that 94% of employers are definitely or very likely to continue employer-sponsored health care. That’s a pretty good indication of no major drop outs compared to 2012, when only 46% were certain that they would continue sponsorship.

But expanded health insurance coverage will come at a cost, and small employers particularly are vulnerable. As a result, they are implementing cost control tactics: encouraging healthy behaviors and wise usage that reduces costs, entering private health exchanges, offering self-insurance for small groups, and reducing the number of full timers.

For insurance companies, reform opens up new opportunities to serve the small business market. Small businesses today are treated as a uniform group with similar needs. As reform unfolds, the market will fragment into: those who truly believe in providing insurance to their employees and will continue to do so, those who cannot afford to pay increased premiums but are still interested, and those who simply opt to exit the market. Smart and creative insurers will look for ways to serve the middle segment with unique offerings, whether those are self-insurance, stripped down plans, voluntary products, or others. The insurers that will move first by matching deep customer knowledge with creativity and innovation will have a leg up in this rapidly evolving market.

Rachel is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group, she specializes in finding growth opportunities in new market segments, new products and businesses and innovative business models.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin South Street Strategy GroupBailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

 

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, healthcare research, health insurance research

Tauck Creates a New Type of Travel Experience

Posted by Judy Melanson

Wed, Jul 17, 2013

Originally published in Loyalty360

CMB Focused InnovationInnovating and successfully launching new products, be they loyalty programs or sneakers, is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly-defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fail at execution.mproving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions;” pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company at the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and an aging of customer base. They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers, a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved:

1. Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge, and constraints: We started by exploring the business context through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including the need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers

2. Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences. We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.

3. Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but we needed more detail to actually build out the product. We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices. This information guided product design and pricing. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who would buy, if they are really interested, and how their interest changes by price.

4. Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips, contract with hotels, and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

culturiousThe result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.   

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge, identify your constraints, and get focused on your Focused Innovation process!

Judy is VP of CMB's Travel & Entertainment practice and loves collaborating with her clients. She's the mom of two teens and the wife of an oyster farmer. Follow Judy on Twitter at @Judy_LC 

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.dpuf

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.dpuf

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.dpuf

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.dpuf

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.

Innovating and successfully launching new products –be they loyalty programs or sneakers – is a difficult job requiring significant investment and navigating initiative-sinking risks.  Compounding the problem, for many firms, the innovation process itself is poorly -defined and unfocused—a great idea can morph into a poorly conceived solution or fails at execution.

Improving your chance of success requires a focused innovation process—a structured process where you apply the “right method” to the “right questions”; pursuing innovation within constraints, and focusing on untapped market opportunities.

We recently presented a case study of focused innovation in action at the Front End of Innovation conference.  The case study highlights a project with Tauck Worldwide; in partnership with our sister company the South Street Strategy Group.

Tauck is a travel industry leader; for nearly 100 years, it has focused on providing high value guided tours for its highly satisfied customers. But Tauck recognized some challenges to their future success—the erosion of the guided travel industry and the aging of their customer base.  They needed to create a new kind of travel experience to meet the needs of affluent Baby Boomers – a population extremely comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own.  In partnership with South Street Strategy Group, our Focused Innovation process involved: 

1.     Identifying the primary goal, opportunity or business challenge – and the constraints we had to work within: We started by exploring the business context, through internal ideation, interviews, and workshops with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market, and researching and assessing the competitive landscape. This step helped us answer questions and identify constraints, including a need to:

·       Leverage Tauck’s core competencies

·       Design a new product, addressing unmet needs

·       Hit sales goal of $M in X time period by attracting new customers
 

2.     Investigating the opportunity using multiple methods:  We collected insights from different people (e.g., travel agents, call center reps, potential customers) and information sources to uncover customer needs and preferences.  We segmented the Boomer market by travel preferences and conducted in-depth qualitative research to identify the target market and flesh out the desired experience for different types of vacations. The key output was a ranking of travel concepts on key criteria, and an initial read on the market opportunity.
 

3.     Validate and optimize:  So we had some great ideas for new trips and a new market to tackle, but more detail was required to actually build out the product.  We used a Discrete Choice model, to simulate market demand for various product alternatives and prices.  This information guided product’s design, pricing, and enabled us to focus on those who are most interested in actually purchasing the product. A critical piece of this stage is emulating real world choices—a trip can sound appealing, but at this stage we want to know who and if they are really interested – and how interest changes by price.
 

4.     Implementation and go to market: With the concept validated, the Tauck team needed to build out the trips –contract with hotels and identify top events and attractions for multiple locations. The comprehensive understanding of their target market also guided their decisions, including how to brand the products, establish relevant partnerships, and reach out to potential customers using traditional channels as well as online and social media. Although it’s often glossed over, this critical go-to-market planning stage can mean the difference between success and failure.

The result of this focused approach? Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line, on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active Baby Boomers with an interest in physically challenging, culturally engaging travel. Culturious has consistently received “exceptional” guest satisfaction scores and won the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

Focusing innovation on the end-goal and working within constraints enabled Tauck to quickly launch a successful innovative product. Leveraging their existing competencies to address unmet needs in the Affluent Boomer marketplace enabled them to hit sales goals in Year 1.     

Top 10 benefits of a focused innovation approach:

1.     Aligns solution/ideation with strategy

2.     Solution is customer centric

3.     Focused on growth markets

4.     Provides flexible framework to drive from insight to action

5.     Enables deep conversations, by function, on goals and insights learned

6.     Adapts to handle “big problems” as well as “ready to test” concepts/ideas

7.     Creates Center of Excellence to facilitate and support efforts in agile manner

8.     Captures learning from each initiative

9.     Facilitates and supports with framework, expert resource and best practices

10.   Provides a governance structure to focus resources, including harnessing power of ideas within the organization

So, what are you waiting for?  Consider your challenge – identify your constraints – and get focused on your focused Innovation process!

- See more at: http://loyalty360.org/loyalty-management/july-2013-online-issue/tauck-creates-a-new-type-of-travel-experience#sthash.gMf5DUVE.dpuf

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, travel and hospitality research, growth and innovation

Myth-Busting Customer Centricity In Healthcare

Posted by Jennifer von Briesen

Tue, Jul 16, 2013

Target consumer or accountHealthcare in the US has been a hot media topic, and the Affordable Care Act’s next key provision that goes into effect on October 1 will bring about profound change in the health insurance industry. Consumers looking to buy individual health insurance will be able to enroll in subsidized plans offered through state-based exchanges with coverage beginning in January 2014.Regardless of the politics and adoption hurdles surrounding the subject, it’s crystal clear that health insurers will need to change the way they approach the market in the coming years. Challenging as it may be, this change represents opportunity as well. Not only will this regulation open up channels to sell direct to new customer segments that have previously been underserved or never served, but the shift to a more retail-oriented business model will push customer-centricity to the forefront of health insurers’ strategy.

So, what does customer centricity actually mean for insurers? It’s not something I have hard and fast answers to yet, but we’re collaborating with our clients to help define a path forward. Here are my top-level thoughts on some of the myths that need to be put to rest in order to build a successful customer strategy in the space:

MYTH: The consumer matters more than the ecosystem.
FACT: Up to now, consumers have generally been “extended stakeholders” in the health insurance ecosystem, and they are definitely an audience that insurers should be learning about and listening to more given the change on the horizon. However, serving the consumer well means also understanding how other players—employers, brokers and providers—are preparing for change. Be careful not to develop blind spots toward traditional stakeholders.

MYTH: If you build technology, the customers will come.
FACT: No doubt today’s consumers are open to social tools, apps and other tech solutions that will help them learn about and interact with companies. But in order for a new technology to really matter to consumers, it has to solve a pain point.  Without a deep understanding of what customers need, and a willingness to address root-level issues (such as consumer trust), a new technology is just a shiny object.

MYTH: You’ve got the right data…and it’s Big.
FACT: Insurers have a lot of data. But it’s primarily based on claims and transactional data, with very little gleaned directly from healthcare consumers themselves about wants, needs, and interaction pain points. The industry’s legacy of being claim-oriented continues to drive consumer dissatisfaction and distrust, so it’s not the ideal source for data that will build customer intimacy.

What other myths need to be busted in order for insurers to be truly customer centric? We’d love to hear from you and promise to share our thinking as it evolves.

Jennifer is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group. She recently received the 2013 “Member of the Year” award by the Association for Strategic Planning (ASP), the preeminent professional association for those engaged in strategic thinking, planning and action.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin Bailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, healthcare research, health insurance research, big data, customer experience and loyalty

Innovating Inside the Box

Posted by Rachel Corn

Tue, Jul 02, 2013

thinking outside the boxDrew Boyd and Jacob Goldenberg want you to Think Inside the Box.

Their recent article in the Wall Street Journal encapsulates the increasingly jaded perceptions of innovation in the corporate world—where “brainstorm has become a byword for tedium and frustration,” and innovators are told to “go wild making analogies to things that have nothing to do with your product or business.”Ouch.

But it’s true. Innovation has suffered from a bad reputation of unfocused creative sessions that, in the end, provide little value to solving a real business problem. The answer? We at South Street have long believed that efficient and effective innovation requires focus. Focus on solving a pressing problem which a business owner experiences…focus on how to get to an underserved but attractive customer segment… focus on ways to extract complexities out of the system.

It may sound counterintuitive, but in our work we advocate that constraints are a necessary element to fuel innovation and creativity.

So what techniques does focused innovation employ? Here are a few that we’ve found applicable across industries and clients.

  • Lightening up. Boyd and Goldberg call it “subtraction.” GE called it “de-featuring.” Regardless of the name, the strategy involves removing essential elements in order to get a new offering. Think: an exercise bike is a bike with one wheel removed. It’s a simple solution, but it opened up a new market of users. And it’s an idea that’s applicable in both product and service industries. For instance, we’ve worked with a top health insurance company to take a complex product offering that had become “richer” over time, and we created an affordable stripped-down model. The rich version has a place, but some segments may prefer the light version.

  • Merging together. In this case, rather than taking features out, seemingly unrelated features are offered in an all-in-one package. For example, the CAPTCHA system not only helps thwart hackers and fraudsters; the text you enter is actually contributing to transcribing old text that’s hard to decipher. At South Street, we worked with a client to merge several disparate products and services to serve a unique segment—one that could not have afforded or had access to the products à la carte.

  • Segmenting out. In our opinion, any innovation needs be rooted in a strong understanding of your target segment. Without this, techniques that define a new offering (such as lightening and merging) are taking shots in the dark as to what your customers really want or need. Look at a customer group that has strong financial potential for you. What are their highest-level goals and needs, and are you (or your competitors) currently satisfying these needs? What techniques can you use to pull from what you are already offering and customize it for this segment?

Innovation should be all about solving specific business problems. By doggedly sticking to this focus, innovation need not be a buzzword at your company.

Rachel Corn is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group, she specializes in finding growth opportunities in new market segments, new products and businesses and innovative business models.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin South Street Strategy GroupBailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, product development, growth and innovation

Medical Devices: Innovation for Less Is More

Posted by Rachel Corn

Tue, Jun 18, 2013

medical device innovationIn the world of medical technology, the historical driver of value has been feature-driven. Hospitals, insurance companies and other payor audiences have been willing to pay a premium for new features—up to a point.

Today, though, in a climate of increased scrutiny over costs, more competition, and stricter reimbursement rules, payors are no longer eager to pay for minor features. This is especially true when looking to “leaner” markets outside of the US. Furthermore, consumers are becoming more empowered in their healthcare and as a result are increasingly looking for solutions that fit their lifestyles, rather than technical feature sets.It’s time for medical technology companies to think about step-change innovation as a driver of value for them and their customers. And this innovation needs to begin and end with focus:

  • …on the customer segment: What are the current and potential markets for this product? Are there under-penetrated segments where a gap exists? Traditionally, companies have not focused on the end-user (the patient); yet this is an opportunity for innovation. We have also seen quite a few products “de-featured” for emerging markets and then brought back to the developed world for a unique segment. Is there a viable market segment that would be served with a “light” version of your product?

  • …on the customer goal: What are customers trying to accomplish with your products? How can you make their jobs easier? This requires communicating solutions—rather that discrete features—that directly solve a pain point. This could involve software, services, etc.

  • …on regulation: Between healthcare reform, re-admission rules and electronic records, healthcare is a prime field to view regulatory changes as an opportunity to make the customer’s life easier. In what ways will regulations change your customer’s business and how can you help?

Looking for innovation in your existing portfolio can be highly lucrative. An example of a “de-featured” product is from GE India: it stripped the bells, whistles and 423 pounds from GE’s $100,000 Logiq 9 ultrasound machine and introduced a handheld device at about a tenth of the price. While this monitor was less advanced than its predecessor, it was a great fit for India due to small size and portability.

What hidden gems lie in your portfolio? Have you uncovered and exhausted opportunities for innovation?

Rachel Corn is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group, she specializes in finding growth opportunities in new market segments, new products and businesses and innovative business models.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin South Street Strategy GroupBailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 


Earlier this year CMB’s MedTech team partnered with the Massachusetts Medical Device Industry Council (MassMEDIC) to survey members for their perspectives on the past, present, and future expectations for innovation and growth in the medical device industry. Click here to download: The 2013 MedTech Industry and Innovation Study.

Topics: technology research, South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, healthcare research, product development, growth and innovation

AMP Up Marketing on a Tight Budget

Posted by Rachel Corn

Thu, May 30, 2013

marketingToday most companies are watching their expenditures closely and are challenged with how to effectively get the word out to prospective customers, but on a limited budget. The key to this is focus, across three different dimensions that we call AMP:

  • Audience. It’s tempting to think that “marketing” doesn’t happen until after a product is finished and ready to sell. However, efficient and effective marketing is tailored to specific segments. This requires a company to have a firm focus on what it’s selling and to whom – early on in product development.

  • Message. In today’s media environment, generic messages are worthless. With a specific, well-researched target market in mind, companies can craft tailored marketing messages that speak specifically to that target’s needs and goals.

  • Promotion. There are some core tactics that every marketer has in his or her arsenal of tools: advertising, PR, conferences, social media, among others. Focus on key tactics and related outlets that you know your target market will look to for the needs you’ve identified.

Blanketing the entire marketplace with broad messaging is expensive, and typically ineffectual for anyone other than big brands who have to maintain broad-based awareness. Doing less in a deliberate way can make your money stretch farther and deliver more tangible results in terms of new, worthwhile prospects. Following the above guidelines, in this specific order, can help you focus your marketing activities.

Do you already have a segment you can hone in on to AMP up your marketing?

Rachel Corn is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group, she specializes in finding growth opportunities in new market segments, new products and businesses and innovative business models.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin South Street Strategy GroupBailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, product development, marketing strategy

Constraints Are the Fuel of Innovation

Posted by Jennifer von Briesen

Mon, May 20, 2013

innovation whiteboardAt any point in the innovation process, businesses can come across new information, trends or practical issues that challenge thinking about what the end result of an innovation should look like. Maybe a new technology can’t scale or the application doesn’t have a big enough market. Or perhaps competitive analysis reveals that a new service or business model isn’t as unique as once thought. There are examples that many of us could on draw from our own experiences. Challenges like these can be frustrating and force businesses to think differently—creatively—about how to move forward. They actually provide the constraints within which an innovation project must operate.

At the FEI conference in Boston, there was a lot of talk about the role of constraints in creativity. Pasquale Cetera, VP of Portfolio Management and Strategy at Merck, brought this into focus during his presentation on R&D decision-making. Pharma is clearly a very developed industry, and this is a key challenge in innovation. The low-hanging fruit has already been developed and is on the market, so to bring new products to market requires more time and investment than ever before. This, along with the fact that regulations are ever-more stringent, means that the average length of drug development is rising, and pharma companies find themselves under pressure to focus and improve success rates at each stage of the development process.

It’s a big challenge with a significant bottom line attached to it. The necessity to maintain the business in spite of this has given rise to innovations that simply were not needed to make a profit until recently. Some of the innovations that Pasquale highlighted include:

  • New lead optimization approaches in the Discovery stage, so that suboptimal leads are let go early-on

  • Use of biomarkers to improve the probability of success in Phase 2 (Efficacy & Proof of Concept)

  • Business model innovation: from fully integrated pharma companies (FIPCOS) to fully integrated pharma networks (FIPNETS)

  • Collaboration with health payers to solve problems vs. traditional antagonistic relationships

Innovating within these kinds of big-picture constraints isn’t just a big-industry phenomenon. There are impressive innovations coming out of emerging markets, be it in the form of new agricultural models that support small farmers, mobile computing in Africa, or new type of distribution system for a CPG in India—as a few examples.

So, the next time you come across a challenge that alters the reality of your business, I encourage you to approach it not as a threat, but as an opportunity to differentiate and push innovation farther than it would have gone otherwise.

Jennifer is a Director at  South Street Strategy Group. She recently received the 2013 “Member of the Year” award by the Association for Strategic Planning (ASP), the preeminent professional association for those engaged in strategic thinking, planning and action.

South Street Strategy Group, an independent sister company of Chadwick Martin Bailey, integrates the best of strategy consulting and marketing science to develop better growth and value delivery strategies. 

See how CMB and the South Street Strategy Group helped SunTrust use a customer-centric approach to inform brand strategy, improve marketing tactics, and drive organizational  transformation. Read the case study.

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, conference recap, growth and innovation

Adventures in the Front End of Innovation

Posted by Megan McManaman

Thu, May 02, 2013

Next week you'll find us at the Front End of Innovation 2013 sharing how we, along with our partners at South Street Strategy, took a practical, focused, and innovative approach to new product development for Tauck Worldwide. Read a little bit about what we did here:

The Challenge

Tauck Case StudyTauck Worldwide, an industry leader with over 85 years experience in premium guided tours, wanted to create a new travel concept to meet the needs of a population increasingly comfortable with researching, planning, and traveling on their own. Tauck needed innovative thinking to define and build a new type of tour product – one that appealed to next gen customers, conveyed a unique brand identity while standing out from competitors in the crowded travel market space. 

What We Did

CMB and principals from South Street Strategy Group used a multi-method, multi-source approach to:

  • Select top opportunities on which to focus

  • Ideate across functions with executives and senior managers, leveraging insight and experience in the market

  • Research and assess the competitive landscape and baby boomer’s core  travel goals and needs – particularly un-met needs

  • Test alternatives to guide product development, pricing and identify target guests who are most interested in the new product line

  • Identify acquisition targets in the travel industry, new business models, and new product offerings, by leveraging core competencies, that would create significant value for the company and address baby boomer needs

  • Work with the CEO, CFO, and COO and the New Ventures Group to ensure recommendations were aligned with business constraints, addressed operational challenges and met business goals

How It Was Used

Tauck launched the Culturious brand as a totally new product line on time and with unanimous board approval. The new brand, which currently consists of 8 packages and destinations, meets customer needs by offering small-group tours geared toward active baby boomers with an interest in active, culturally engaging travel. The brand has won awards, including the 2010 Innovation prize from the Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Partnerships (CQIA).

To learn more about our approach to New Product and Service Development click here.

For more of our case studies click here. 

Topics: South Street Strategy Group, strategy consulting, product development, travel and hospitality research, growth and innovation