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Beer, Pot, Car Racing and More: A brief roundup of Quirks East 2018

Posted by Julie Kurd

Mon, Mar 05, 2018

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Here are a few learnings from last week's Quirk’s East Event in Brooklyn:

Measuring the success of Corona’s new nonlinear ads. Samrat Samran from AB InBev and Pranav Yadav from Neuro-Insight shared Corona’s advertisements that focus on the lime ritual. These “story fragments” equate the 'feeling' you get when a lime goes into the beer bottle with a surfer plunging into the water. To quantify success of a non-linear advertisement, they established guardrails on five key branding moments (brand memory, emotional intensity, and engagement etc.). Through this framework, they were able to see an increased recall on the second ad view because interestingly, a nonlinear story is challenging enough that the brain seizes on new aspects of the story in the second viewing.

Legal Cannabis is a Brand Innovation Game ChangerIn a time where many Fortune 500 companies are still asking for drug tests, it may not be intuitive to account for cannabis in your innovation pipeline—especially if you don’t work in the cannabis industry. But marijuana pairings are occurring beyond the music, snacks, etc., so it’s time to start paying attention to this growing category. In the BDS Analytics presentation, of those studied (28% were users, 34% were acceptors, and 38% were rejecters), almost everyone (including rejecters) universally accept some form of marijuana use as ‘acceptable’. And in this case, rejecters aren’t necessarily opponents, they just choose not to use. The cannabis market is diverse in generation, gender, and motivations—and likely will continue to grow in complexity.

NASCAR’s Passive Metering and Digital Media Tracking. NASCAR’s Norris Scott and Luth’s Candice Rab spoke about their behavior-based insights research. In the study, respondents downloaded an app that passively tracked behavior across devices—from PC, smartphone, and tablet. Integrating digital data with survey research helped contextualize participants’ behavior and shed light on the “why” behind attitudes and consumption of digital sports media among NASCAR fans and super-fans. Through this approach, NASCAR discovered that fans are also looking at a range of other sports content, such as ESPN, Yahoo Sports, etc., and half the fans use digital to enhance their race viewing experience.   

Gen Z (Tweens, Teens) and their Secret (Visual) Languages. Kids have always loved having secret languages that bonds and empowers them. Writing has given way to typing to tapping to snapping, per Stephanie Retblatt of SmartyPants. Text has morphed into videos, and videos to emojis, GIFs, memes, filters, and stickers. This evolution marks the significant shift in how kids and tweens experience emotions in ways that text hasn’t kept up with. “Animoji” and “Bitmoji” are part of a new visual curation brought to us by Snapchat.

Changing role of Artificial Intelligence in research. Whether you’re a F500 company or a Consumer Insights firm, Peter Mackey of Wizer says we need to take AI seriously. Peter showed how a chasm is starting to build between client reality (speed over quality, tighter budgets) and traditional consumer insights. In traditional insights, qualified thinkers brainstorm with you, frame the challenge, and craft the research design—all of which is time intensive. These days, budget-conscious marketers have resorted to DIY surveys, templated survey automation, human supervised/semi-automated coding and transcription. Today, we’re all experimenting with AI in market research world (#MRX):

  • Input – Automating the survey
  • Data Processing – quantitative and qualitative quality control such as respondent fraud detection algorithms
  • Output – positive findings in green and negative in red.  Natural language interpretation.
Co-Creation and the Future of Loyalty & Rewards with the Hilton. To break out of the “sea of sameness”, executives and consumers can come together to ideate innovative solutions using a co-creation approach. My company, CMB, presented with our client, Jessica Boothe of Hilton, on a recent co-creation session that explored the future of Global Loyalty and Rewards programs. Hilton has renovated its rewards program, simplifying both the earn and the burn aspects of rewards. This co-creation initiative discovered and re-discovered potential new emotional and functional rewards for both elite and non-elite members of the Honors program.      

Whether you always have a travel bag to unpack, or you ‘never get to go anywhere,’ learning is always available to everyone. Sign up for our upcoming webinar on Wednesday, 3/7 at 12pm ET.

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Topics: conference recap

CMB + ABC @ TMRE 2017: Attracting Viewers (& Customers) in the Golden Age of Content

Posted by Megan McManaman

Mon, Oct 23, 2017

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We're less than 24 hours into TMRE 2017 and it has been a whirlwind of sessions and great conversations with researchers and marketers from all over the world. If you're not one of the 1000+ people who've converged on Orlando for one of the biggest market research events in the U.S., don't worry—we won't let you miss out. 

This afternoon, CMB's own Judy Melanson and ABC's Lyndsey Albertson presented an in-depth look at how ABC is building a deep understanding of what drives content discovery and what keeps viewers watching! You don't have to be ABC Disney to know how critical it is to gain traction for new products while navigating a market in flux.  As you navigate your customer journeys, amid seismic shifts, are you asking and answering these 7 critical questions?

  1. What does “new” mean to your consumers; what content, products, and materials can you re-merchandise?
  2. Do you understand how your industry’s disruptors are meeting customer needs?
  3. Are you regularly evaluating your schedules to ensure offerings break through and remain relevant?
  4. How well is your brand’s story connecting with your customers’ emotions?
  5. Are you fully leveraging the power of social to engage?
  6. How are your distribution points ensuring relevance and stickiness?
  7. Have you adapted your product availability to better fit with consumer needs (that may be changing due to competitor offerings)?

Learn more about how we're helping leading brands ask, answer and act on the questions that matter, drop us a note or give us a call:

Contact us!

At TMRE now? Stop by Booth 409 to chat! 

 

Topics: conference recap, digital media and entertainment research, customer journey

Don’t Throw Away Your Shot: the 2017 Corporate Researchers Conference (CRC)

Posted by Julie Kurd

Thu, Oct 19, 2017

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It was quite a week to be in Chicago for lovers of musicals and insights!  As one of the lucky market researchers who got to attend the Corporate Researchers Conference AND see Hamilton, I knew I couldn’t “throw away my shot” to share just a few highlights that inspired me and made me think.

First up, the critical question: Marketers and Researchers, how are you helping your company to differentiate, separate, and grow? If you want to be “in the room” with your company’s decision-makers, and not just the bearer of insights, you’re going to have to employ art and science. Here’s what some of your peers are doing:

  • Judd Antin of Airbnb will ONLY hire “full stack” researchers—those with 1) formative qualitative (ethnos), 2) evaluative qualitative (usability), 3) survey design, 4) applied statistics (yeah), and 5) SQL (merging data sets etc.). He sees the sciences as key to growth, a solution to homophily and the confirmation bias that limits our thinking and growth. He is definitely not throwing away his shot. He challenges us to get outside of our point of view and has established guidelines for non-English surveys in a company that is in hundreds of countries.  His group is redesigning the host interface, conducting ‘check-in’-a-longs (take me!) and he’s demanding rigorous quantitative analysis to prioritize the strategically important improvements and operational optimize the tactical elements. They have a full time international community member panel in 10 countries and in 10 languages and they translate surveys in and out of native languages for results in a single week. As Alexander Hamilton would say, “Learn to think continentally".
  • Charise Shields from Toyota reminded us that women buy cars. Millennials buy cars. Millennial women buy cars. They are redefining the two-year intender path to purchase, and they aren’t a monolithic block. They are single parents, married parents, couples without kids, and childless singles. The upper funnel of the purchase decision funnel has been democratized because the path to purchase begins online. This shift in the anatomy of the purchase journey means researchers need to reevaluate their preferences for relying solely on advanced quantitative research. Charise’s presentation was a great example of why I love CRC—talking to researchers who are flexible, innovative, and willing to try new things.
  • Ronda Slaven from Synchrony Financial and Neil Marcus from MetLife were not afraid to discuss the disturbing implications of poor participant experience on deflating brand equity. Both Ronda and Neil spoke candidly about their experience and the work they are doing to improve the participant experience. It seems like a simple gesture, but Neil shared a video (shot with an iPhone!) of himself thanking participants for their time. MetLife embedded the “thank you” video at the end of a survey, and saw a significant increase in participant satisfaction among those who watched the video over those who didn’t. Ronda and Neil are challenging their teams to push the envelope on improving participant satisfaction—practically shouting “I’m past patiently waiting, I’m passionately smashing expectation, every action is an act of creation.”  These brave researchers are reshaping the industry’s poor habit of cramming everything into a questionnaire or moderator’s guide. After all, in a way, participants are an extension of the organization and their happiness matters.
  • Mark Stephens from American Family is an agent for change, Mark and Judd are very alike in that they see the power of both qualitative and quantitative as a pathway to company growth and to making the world a better place. OK this is CMB’s co-presentation, and I work at CMB, so it’s easy to see your own work as a masterpiece, but, sitting in a full room of the LAST session of the LAST day, the researchers in the audience asked two dozen questions about proxy variables and appending data and drilled for understanding like Hamilton….studying profoundly, day and night so their minds are obsessed with “the fruit of labor and thought”.
  • Kate Morris of Fidelity presented on her public relations research work. She drilled home the importance of being memorable because memorable is actionable. Of course, storytelling is a typical imperative in the research world, Kate’s wonderful defiance and unique perspective reminds us, as Hamilton reminds us, to ask “who tells your story?”
The market research industry is maturing, and with maturity comes the responsibility to deny the mediocrity of “talk less, smile more” and to insist that the tactics and strategy are shaped by advanced quantitative and qualitative research and not by habit or blind conformity. It’s time to ask…“If you stand for nothing, what will you fall for?”

 

Topics: conference recap, Market research

Conference Recap: New England Insights Association Spring Event

Posted by Brian Jones

Wed, Jun 14, 2017

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Insights professionals have a lot of opportunities to learn and network—there is no shortage of conferences, webinars, and meetups—but making time to get out of the office can be a challenge. I get it! That’s why I’ve always valued local industry events—and in particular those hosted by our local chapter of the Market Research Association.

With the merger of the Market Research Association (MRA) and CASRO I was interested to see how our local chapter would adapt. My first look into the new organization was the New England Insights Association (NEIA) Spring Conference. I was happy to see the turnout was great and energy was high. So, what did we take away from the event? I asked some of my fellow CMB attendees to share their favorite takeaways:

  • NEIA helps legitimize market research as a means of delivering valid insights to our clients. With the propagation of “Fake News” and “Alternative Facts” in the media and on social channels, we're all suffering from information overload. Our profession must take the high road amid the noise and ensure we continue to deliver reliable, accurate insights. In the opening session of the conference, David Harris of Insight & Measurement and Ted Pulsifer of Market Cube reminded us that respondents are people and we achieve quality primary research data when we remember that questionnaires are forms of communication with them. They discussed several respondent-centric questionnaire development best practices that yield more accurate answers to the business questions we are asking.
  • We need to remain future-focused and leverage existing (and new) technology. First, Mariann Lowery and Alex Olson of MGMA spoke about how simple SMS technology can be supercharged as a thought leadership polling platform for the healthcare industry. Then, Frank Kelly of Lightspeed Research spoke about how we can get deeper insights in quantitative studies by using voice, video, and other traditionally qualitative technologies. While not “new”, they have become ubiquitous and the tools for using them efficiently at large scales are constantly improving—to our benefit.
  • As researchers, we need to be careful about how we ask questions. The way a question is phrased can have a serious impact on respondents’ answers. For example, at the conference, a volunteer was asked about the placement and number of balloons she saw printed on a colorfully decorated blindfold. Even though there actually weren’t any balloons on the blindfold, after the questioning, the volunteer had become convinced there  were This is a simple example of the power of suggestion and how as researchers we can have a significant amount of influence over respondents’ answers. That’s why it’s important we are cognizant of how and what we’re asking to limit those biases.
  • The importance of knowing your target audience is as critical for B2B research as B2C. Kim Wallace of Wallace & Wallace Associates, described his version of the customer decision journey and the impact that marketing messaging can have on the buyer’s decision. For me, his B2B examples underscored the value and importance of sending the right marketing message to the right potential buyer. 
  • Our industry needs to hear and amplify the voice of corporate researchers. A panel of corporate researchers, including Cathy James of Keurig, Rick Blake of The Hartford, Joe Johnson of LogMeIn and Amy Zalatan of Vistaprint, provided great perspective on the relationship between corporate researchers and research suppliers. They discussed how industry and business culture, coupled with how the insights function is structured internally, varies greatly by organization, and leads to different perspectives on the relationships and values they have with supply-side research companies. The discussion centered on challenges they face as corporate researchers and how they create actionable insights grounded in business decisions.

Overall, the first annual NEIA Spring Event was a great success. I gained insights from industry peers, networked with the New England research community, and came back to work feeling inspired and refreshed.

I encourage anyone interested in staying informed or getting involved with their local Insights Association chapter to visit their website.

CMB is committed to staying involved with local Insights Association chapters. In fact, our VP of eCommerce and Digital Media, Brant Cruz, recently presented with robotics firm, Anki, at the IA Northwest Educational Summit last week in San Francisco. If you’re interested in learning more about this presentation, sign up here to receive your copy of “How to Keep a Cutting-Edge Tech Product Relevant for Today’s Fickle Consumer”.

Brian Jones is a New England transplant from Central New York; but don’t hold that against him. He likes chicken and shells as much as the next guy but is missing good chicken wings. Thanks to Lauren Sears, Senior Associate Researcher at CMB, who contributed content to this article. Lauren’s also from New York but likes Boston better. Shh, don’t tell her family.

Topics: conference recap

Look Everywhere

Posted by Julie Kurd

Fri, May 12, 2017

NEXT.pngA F500 CMO walked in to our office with just a pen (but no paper). This isn’t the intro to bad joke, it really happened.  If a CMO can be open, prioritize learning, and trust the world to freely share ideas (and a sheet of paper to write on), then as the Head of Strategy and Insights, or even as the Insights Analyst fresh out of school, you should too.

One of the easiest ways to learn and grow professionally is to attend conferences and webinars. It’s not enough to just be great at your role and manage and execute a stable of projects—and you definitely don’t get points for saying things like ‘system 1 thinking’.  

Have no budget and no time allocated for conferences? Attend free webinars offered by virtually everyone with something to say (you can find CMB’s here). Have a small budget and a day per year? Sign up for the economically priced local chapter sessions (New England’s on May 18 and San Francisco’s on June 8). Can you commit to a larger format that takes more time away and offers more tracks (and costs more)?  Participate in conferences such as the Insights Association’s NEXT or CRC

Earlier this week I traveled to NYC for the NEXT Conference. What did I learn? Glad you asked:

  • Science and Creativity walk into a bar—I loved the title of Pranav Yadav’s presentation but the content was even better: a great strategic summary of the neuro category (e.g., eye tracking, facial coding, galvanic skin response, belts/monitors, MRIs) followed by specific advertising examples of when the neuro element is tracking above or below average. Do you just roll ads that were tested on TV into your digital and other (e.g. billboard) content? Depending upon the channel, the ads should be recut. For example, iconic triggers work best on billboards and more functional use screens (iPads/tablets), whereas particular cuts of a longer ad should wind up in a shorter spot that’s rearranged for social media.
  • The Control (Freak) Enthusiast–Michael Tchong decribes a trend among the US population that’s growing increasingly obsessed with having control over all things at all times. Think about how the control phenomenon has seeped into your life, too. You know exactly how far away your Uber driver is, every movement of your Amazon order, and when your pizza from GrubHub will be arriving—we’re all becoming Control Enthusiasts. What does this mean for your brand?
  • Shark Tank Stories for dwindling attention spans—You have to make heads “turn” not “spin”. Don’t just revise your 50-slide decks. Instead, if you receive one of these monster decks, reply to the attached document simply saying “TL;DR” (too long; didn’t read) to disrupt your reporting and inspire a sea change. Insights NEXT scheduled a ‘shark tank’ session where four talented companies pitched their ideas and of the four, the pitch by Anders Bengtsson from Protobrand, won the shark tank portion.

Life is hectic and budgets are tight, but you can’t afford not to learn and grow. You can afford to send each of your team members to a few free webinars, a local chapter event, or to the next great conference where you can meet your peers, new vendors, and get exposure to the latest ideas and technology. 

Kelsey Saulsbury of Schwanns summed up the conference imperative in a single phrase uttered by a squealing child on an Easter Egg Hunt at her cousin’s house, “Look everywhere!”

Julie Kurd thrives in hectic, dynamic environments full of shiny thinkers with snowflake personalities.

Topics: conference recap