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2021: Accepting, Embracing and Seeking Change

Posted by Jim Garrity

Fri, Dec 18, 2020

2021 Jim Blog Opener

While every new year brings the opportunity to reflect, learn, and look toward the future, this year’s rituals feel especially poignant. As a company, we entered 2020 with a clear vision, and while our grit and resilience were tested, we remained steadfast in our approach. We flexed as needed, and then we forged ahead with focus, agility, and determination—in our commitment to our clients, team-members and communities.

We’re ready to think and deliver big in 2021 because the need to not just understand, but to empathize and connect with people is more relevant than ever. We are focused on leveraging the very best of human intelligence with advanced technology to help organizations make those connections, and as a result better engage with their consumers to innovate and grow.

We’ll continue to raise the bar by doubling down on our strengths, including:

  • Growing the deep expertise and collaborative efforts of our team members: In 2020, CMBers refused to let physical distance be a barrier to collaboration, achieving results, or embracing our clients’ thorniest challenges. We’ll only become stronger because of the indomitable passion, commitment, and integrity which is a hallmark of every member of our team.
  • Deepening our strong client partnerships: we’re so grateful to have incredibly strong client relationships—built by delivering exceptional value and impact, yes, but also through the thoughtful efforts that take place outside of the meetings and the weekly check-ins and through real human-to-human connection. Having genuine connections and bringing value to people’s lives are more critical now than ever.
  • Embracing change to solve problems: We will continue to help our clients solve their newest problem: how to adjust, pivot, and refocus in a time of significant disruption.
  • Investing in our communities. We will continue to invest in the communities in which we live and work through our Foundation Giving and volunteer program. Continuing our support of organizations committed to families, education, health and wellness, and racial equity.

In 2021, we will bring all of this together to amplify consumer voices and stories to the people who can serve them better. And we will do this by leveraging the latest technology and tools to get us there most effectively.

This year has been all about change—we have accepted it, embraced it, and in many ways sought it out. In the coming years we will continue to drive forward and make positive and lasting impact for our clients, our organization, and our community. I am confident that we are well positioned to tackle these new challenges and opportunities together.

Thank you for your partnership this past year and in the years to come.


Jim GarrityJim Garrity is CEO of CMB.

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Topics: strategy consulting, technology solutions, business decisions, marketing strategy, integrated data, growth and innovation, Market research, community, agile research, collaborative intelligence, COVID-19, CMB Culture, customer centricity, mrx, Holidays

A Data Geek’s Take on Holiday Shopping and the Election

Posted by Brant Cruz

Fri, Dec 11, 2020

Brant Cruz Data Geek Holiday Shopping and Electon Dec 2020 Blog Opener

As someone who has spent nearly 25 years finding insightful truth in piles of data, I’ve accidentally trained my brain to be good at little else. For example, I’ve been in the top percent of dads when it comes to teaching my kids how to “estimate” in their early math classes, but could almost hear my brain crack when they needed help with geometry and its many obtuse angles

This is why, for nearly every topic I stumble upon, I immediately start analyzing and contextualizing the numbers. Instinctively, my brain takes me through the following sequence:

  1. Is that number in line with what I would have estimated?
  2. Can I contextualize it in terms of a number or change I am familiar with, and explain to someone less familiar “why” the number is what it is?
  3. If the answers to both #1 and #2 are “no,” is there other data can I use to reconcile the disconnect?
  4. If things still don’t line up, can I reasonably conclude that I am missing some important context that isn’t available publicly or in the data set that I am analyzing?
  5. If the answers to #3 and #4 are also “no,” have I or the author done something wrong (accidentally or intentionally through some bias)?

In my professional life, this is a perpetual stream, but all the best examples are proprietary. So, instead, I’ll illustrate with a couple of current newsworthy events: the 2020 Holiday Shopping Season to date, and the 2020 US Presidential Election.

Example 1: 2020 Holiday Shopping Season

This is a great CNBC article that features multiple data points, publicly available thanks to the power of Adobe Analytics, related to the US Holiday shopping season. Just picking one:

Holiday shoppers spent $10.8 billion on Cyber Monday, up 15.1% from 2019.”

Here’s an abbreviated recollection of my thought process:

  1. The number feels intuitively right in light of what I remember from past Cyber-Mondays, the overall trend of eCommerce, everything I have been reading about Brick & Mortar retail struggles…and, I have very high trust for Adobe’s data and the rigor of that team. Plus, there are other numbers in the same article that feel intuitive, e.g., $10.8 billion of a total ~$185 billion holiday season. My head-math says that current definitions of holiday season are likely around 50 days, meaning each day is 2% of the season. And Cyber Monday would be ~6% (3x average), which checks out.
  2. As far as the contextual “why” goes, it fits with my mental model of how the combination of headwinds and tailwinds for eCommerce net out in 2020:
    1. Headwinds: COVID-19 might be depressing total holiday spend across all channels given the economic struggles, short-term uncertainty, desire to save, and sad letters you can find (but also help!) through the USPS’s Operation Santa site.
    2. Tailwinds: eCommerce sales rose 18.8% in 2019 so this just continues that trend. Plus, perceptually, shoppers en masse feel far less “able” to shop of brick & mortar retail this year due to COVID-19. Rather than reinvent how my colleague Erica Carranza so aptly described the Fogg Model’s two axes of Motivation and Ability and possible implications for shopping months ago, I’ll point you to her blog.  

Given I feel so confident at this point, no need to continue with steps 3-5.

Example 2: President Trump says, “There is no way Joe Biden got 80 million votes”

Putting aside all other political issues leading up to, during, and since the election, this one stuck out to me as appropriately data-geek-worthy. President Trump may have made this claim multiple times, but I can say with certainty that he made it on a call with Fox News on November 29. Here’s how I processed this claim:

  1. I know that combined Trump and Clinton received 129 million votes in 2016, with Clinton winning the popular vote at just south of 66 million. And that Obama set the record in 2008 with 69.5 million votes. 80 million votes for Biden represents a ~21% lift over 2016 Clinton, and a ~15% over Obama’s record. Big jumps and certainly within the realm of possibility, but worth more investigation.
  2. There are lots of ways to contextualize a 15% lift, but I wanted to make sure I understood why.
    1. Anecdotally, people on both sides are more passionate about politics as evidenced by social media posts, strong passion for and against Trump, and media ratings.
    2. The candidates combined for >$14 billion in election spending, more than double what Trump and Clinton spent in 2016. That’s an increased spend of 100%+, for a 20% increase in turnout. Certainly believable.
    3. Back to the trusty Fogg Model: both Ability (in some neighborhoods, the need to wait in 9-hour voting lines due to closed polling locations was replaced with the ability to vote by mail) and Motivation (the aforementioned hyper-partisanship and Trump’s polarization) axes have seen big bumps since 2016.
  3. Is there other data available that I can reference? I don’t think so—and it seems like recounts and the courts agree.
  4. Could I be missing something? Likely not. (See above response to step #3.)
  5. Yes, I can see that President Trump may have some bias, given the prize and some historical context.

As you can see, this approach is pretty helpful in a job where I’m constantly involved in proving the rigor of my team’s data and analysis (and the resulting insights/business implications) to some of the world’s smartest and most passionate clients.

But you can imagine the faces I get from my daughters when statements like, “Dad, we need YouTube TV” are met with, “Oh yeah? Prove it.”


Brant CruzBrant Cruz is one of the many data geeks at CMB and is our VP: Platforms and Audiences Practice Leader.

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Topics: strategy consulting, business decisions, marketing science, marketing strategy, brand health and positioning, digital media and entertainment research, Market research, Election, retail, consumer psychology, ecommerce, COVID-19, mrx, Holidays

Who Are Your Fab 5?

Posted by Julie Kurd

Mon, Nov 30, 2020

Fab 5 Blog Opener (1)Who are the 5 people you regularly interact with in your professional life? Michael Veltri asked this key question during his virtual appearance at my company’s Virtual Sales Kickoff. His ideas about connection are especially relevant in a pandemic, where travel is limited, and our worlds can shrink unless we’re engaging regularly with clients, prospects, colleagues, and industry professionals.

Veltri’s points:

  1. CONDUCT A FAB 5 INVENTORY: Who are your current Fab ~5? These are the people who straddle the line between friend and business colleague. You want each other to win and you watch out for ideas/content/innovative methods that they may want to learn about, and vice versa. You show them what you found for them, and you share conversations about goals, plans, and life. You might text, DM, collaborate, video conference, video chat, enjoy virtual drinks, or create groups and book clubs.
    During the pandemic, I’ve also been jogging ‘with’ some of my Fab 5 (well, with their podcasts) 4 mornings a week. With that long-form of listening, I learn a lot, and I rely on their deep knowledge to continue to explore my own interests*.
  2. EXPAND YOUR FAB 5 DREAM TEAM: This network expansion effort is about who you need in your future Fab 5, and vice versa, so that you can drive impact (grow your company’s bottom line, expand your community service impact, realize personal objectives, hire amazing colleagues). Once you identify your future focus, you can make sure that you are investing hours that help bring you to that new reality.
    A friend recently told me her personal trainer calls her every Monday morning before 8am to quiz her on her weekend wellness behaviors. The first call, she was irritated, but after three weeks, she’s choosing healthier options and she can’t wait for those weekly chats. He’s unlocking the value in their relationship by authentically engaging and motivating her future wellness by focusing on her KPIs. She said she’s 75% more likely to renew for his new gym at a 20% premium cost. Is it just a sales ploy? No way. He is just being himself, and he is increasing the probability of his success by being human and learning how her needs dovetail with his solution fit. She was part of his Fab 5, and now he is going to be part of hers.
  3. TAKE RELEVANT ACTION: Veltri encourages us to take actions to build our Fab 5. Action has never been easier to initiate, because participating in virtual meetings and events is relatively frictionless (no travel, no fee in most cases). You can enter the room with your video off and voice muted (no expectations from the group), and you can log off and re-charge at will when you need a break. This incredible velocity of content and access to networking will undoubtedly decline after the vaccine is distributed and we begin commuting again.
    My recommendation is start today with a commitment to yourself to invest X hours getting to know your clients and industry colleagues more deeply. Pledge some time every week to interacting, to helping our industry peers whose jobs were eliminated during the pandemic, to community service, to personal goals, and/or to improving our understanding of our ever-expanding Insights community. Register and participate in the abundance of free events with Insights Association, Greenbook, Quirks, QRCA, ESOMAR, TMRE, Women in Research, Jamin’s Tuesday Series, university offerings, etc.
* If you’re looking for industry podcasts, start with Jamin Brazil’s Happy Market Research Podcast, Sima Vasa’s Data Gurus, Adam Jolley and Adam Dietrich’s The Ride, Priscilla McKenney’s Ponderings from the Perch, and I have a list for non-industry but start with AJ Kieran’s The 16 oz Canvas, which features the humans creating beer can label design and more.

Julie KurdFor more conversation on Fab 5, message Julie or another colleague to continue the dialogue. Julie Kurd is the VP Business Development at CMB.

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Topics: conference recap, Market research, mrx, Networking