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Boaty McBoatface: Social Media Meets Market Research on the Cyber Seas

Posted by Brian Jones

Mon, May 02, 2016

Boaty_McBoatface.pngIn case you missed it, the UK’s Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) asked a silly question on a serious topic, and the cyber seas responded in kind. News media and bloggers converged in viral fashion and grabbed the opportunity to steer the campaign on their own course. I put my market research cap on and joined the flotilla. 

Background on the Buzz

On March 17th, the NERC agency launched a campaign to promote the future launch of their newest and largest research ship, designed to carry scientists and their equipment to the earth’s Polar Regions. Their #NameOurShip campaign invited the public to submit name ideas, and it quickly caught on as an opinion poll. The cyber buzz really unfolded after a public relations professional suggested the name “Boaty McBoatface” upon seeing other silly names people had posted, and the name sailed to the top of the boards. On April 16th, NERC pulled the plug on collecting votes, and a NERC spokesperson stressed that there is no guarantee the ship would be named after the winning entry because the final decision will be made by the chief executive of the organization.    

What I Learned from Those Influenced by the Campaign

The #NameOurShip campaign was hugely successful in emotionally engaging the public, despite the backlash to NERC scuttling the winning name. People left waves of comments for NERC’s leadership to surf through.  

“The only reason I ever heard of this is because of the name controversy. Far more people are likely to stay interested in Boaty McBoatface than some humdrum 'sensible' name, because it has already been adopted as a kind of maritime national pet.” (Comment posted on one of the many Boaty Blogs)

 The comments made for an interesting read, and I came up with a few takeaways. 

  1. There is a deserving national identity with heroic British polar explorers that would look great in large letters on the transom of a $300 million research ship, e.g., the “RRS Henry Worsely” (15,774 votes). Henry Worsely died in January while attempting to complete the first solo and unaided crossing of the Antarctic—just 30 miles short after crossing 900 miles in 71 days. 
  1. Beneath the veneer of the online pranksters and goofballs who posted votes for names like “Ice, Ice Baby” (3,673 votes) and “Boatimus Prime” (8,365 votes), the public clearly wants a memorable name that makes a global statement about British identity, and for some, that’s a whimsical endeavor. 
  1. For some, “Boaty McBoatface” (124,109 votes) presents an opportunity to do public good on the behalf of NERC’s commitment to the pursuit in education in science. The “RRS Dora the Polar Explorer” (983 votes) might not get smirks from scientists performing serious research, but mom and dad might have a more favorable impression of NERC if their child’s bath toy had “NERC” and “Boaty” logos on it. 
  1. Interestingly, very few online posts revealed interest or concern with NERC’s mission to explore issues such as environmental hazards, natural resources, and environmental change. Instead, the names “Steve Prescott” (1,413) and “Poppy-Mai”/”Princess PoppyMai” (40,384 votes) received buzz; both individuals were struck down with rare forms of cancer. If NERC more clearly links their mission to staving off visible human or ecological tragedy, they might make good use of the awareness equity that their campaign has generated. 
  1. For others, the campaign was a pretended attempt of government to give citizens a voice when the final decision rests with privileged few. This is compounded by anxiety over the upcoming European Union membership referendum. NERC must navigate public sentiment in an environment where people are a bit on edge. This is expressly dangerous when a social media campaign is presented as crowdvoting. While crowdvoting or crowdsourcing can be a legitimate form of research, when public perception can’t differentiate a PR campaign masked as a public opinion poll from serious market research, it erodes researcher’s ability to get reliable market insights. 

For market research to work, we need the public to be smart—not silly. There is research value in capturing emotional response, but we need to strive to capture unbiased rational opinion. Social media marketing can taint the waters for research if the public perceives a campaign as being less than honest and truthful. 

The Australian Government is now pirating the #NameOurShip approach for their own new Antarctic scientific research vessel, vowing to avoid the ballast that seemingly sank public opinion of the UK’s campaign. I can’t wait to see what the Aussies come up with. 

Brian is a Senior Project Manager at Chadwick Martin Bailey. Given his Navy background, he feels compelled to point out that the vessel-who-must-be-named is not actually a “boat” and should be called “Shippy McShipface.” 

We're looking for people to join our team! Up for the challenge? Check out our open positions!

Topics: consumer insights, social media, brand health and positioning

CMB Researcher in Residence: UPMC Health Plan's Jim Villella

Posted by Amy Modini

Tue, Apr 26, 2016

jim_upmc2.pngUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan’s Director of Market Intelligence, Jim Villella, sat down with CMB’s Amy Modini to discuss the role of insights and market research at UPMC and the health insurance industry at large.

AM: Tell us a bit about your role as Director of Market Intelligence at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Health Plan.

JV: I oversee all external and internal intelligence within the health insurance industry in our market. Our Insurance Services Division (ISD) includes a lot more than just health insurance. Within the ISD, there are health insurance products as well as a suite of workplace productivity solutions under the WorkPartners brand.  WorkPartners offers worker’s compensation insurance, employee assistance programs, wellness programs, and some business productivity solutions, such as FMLA and short-term disability. Primary research is obviously one of the services that my team offers to all of UPMC ISD. This research is often an assessment of where we are compared to our competitors as well as opinions and attitudes of our current members. We also manage our marketing relational database, which is built at the consumer and employer level, so that we can do targeted marketing campaigns. Overall, it’s a pretty broad list of responsibilities.

AM: It certainly is! As we know, it’s been a disruptive few years for the healthcare industry. Looking ahead, what challenges and opportunities do you see coming?

JV: One of the biggest challenges for many health insurance companies who don’t have a large direct-to-consumer business sector is the end of the extension of the allowance for small groups under 50 to keep the plans they had prior to the implementation of the ACA. When the allowance goes away in 2017, those groups are going to have to move to community-rated insurance plans. Many of those groups will have to evaluate their situation when rates change in 2018, so that’s a challenge that insurers will face: transitioning what happens with those groups. The insurance companies will have to meet that challenge and ensure that they continue to insure those same people, whether it’s through a group or through the individual process. 

There are a lot of constraints on insurance companies with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). There are limitations on profitability and also on mitigating risk, so it’s a little bit harder to make a profit. And, as you can see in some markets, some of the more profit-driven public entities have chosen to take themselves out of the individual market in many areas because they’re finding it hard to have a viable business model in the current environment. There’s a lot of uncertainty in the market about who’s going to be there to provide the insurance solutions that are part of the ACA. 

AM: Do you think being part of an integrated system puts UPMC in a different position than other carriers that are just health insurance companies?

JV: Yes, I do. Because we’re an integrated delivery system, we have a lot more dialogue between the provider and the payer, which gives us more opportunities to intervene and identify solutions that will help people get better and stay healthy. Different payment models also emerge out of this position, which allows us to move away from a situation in which someone is paying providers for a service and move toward compensating them based on the effectiveness of the care. That’s much easier to do in an integrated system where we have direct relationships with a big portion of our provider-base. 

AM: What role do you believe healthcare insights, in particular, could play with some of the challenges and changes in the industry you mentioned?

JV: At the end of the day, much of what we deliver in the insurance business is somewhat commoditized. You have to offer things, in addition to paying claims and providing access to doctors and hospitals that members want, so that they remain with you when they have the opportunity to evaluate options in open enrollment periods. Research helps us immensely in identifying those unmet needs or identifying how well we can meet their needs that go beyond the basics of health insurance. 

Carriers have to move toward having one-on-one relationships between themselves and the individuals that they cover. In the past, carriers have had more of a relationship with a group that covers hundreds or thousands of people at a time, so the model is narrowing to an individual-level, much like auto insurance. You don’t really have employer-sponsored auto insurance. Every one of those carriers is dealing with each individual person one at a time, and that’s what the future of health insurance appears to be moving rapidly toward. The employer model is still the foundation for most U.S. health care, but if the health insurance exchanges continue to be successful and maintain competition and lower premiums—depending on who’s elected—it could continue to become more of an accepted way for Americans to obtain health insurance. 

AM: Let’s shift gears a little bit. Let’s talk about the market share analysis work we’ve done with you over the past couple of years. Can you talk a little bit about this work, and why it’s so important now?

JV: The rapid change in market share, year over year, is something we need to assess as quickly as possible, and the secondary sources we rely on to give us our definitive market share take several months to report. So, when we want to know in January what the market share shift has been, waiting for our secondary sources until July is simply too long. We partner with CMB so we can get a very quick, but accurate, assessment of how much the share has changed. The change in market share used to move at a glacial pace, but now it changes several percentage points for some carriers in a single year. We need to know about those changes as quickly as possible. We also use that study to assess perceptions and opinions of brands as well as what’s important to decision-makers, which helps us do some strategic planning for marketing purposes. 

AM: You’ve already touched on this a little bit, but how does this work play into your larger insights strategy?

JV: It helps us position ourselves and try to identify which areas of the geography we’re in that we could potentially focus on more. We get a more robust view of that at the county level from our secondary source in July. If we were to find opportunities or weaknesses in that share data—such as gaining or losing to a particular carrier in a particular region—we could react to that. It also helps us understand where the national competitors have gained traction—which ones are winning out and where. We need to be able to respond and understand who our competitors are as quickly as possible. 

AM: As you think about the next challenges for your organization, tell us what you look for in an insights partner.

JV: Several things:

  • Experience with our industry is helpful if not essential. Health insurance is a very complicated industry. I think it’s very difficult to partner with a research vendor that has no familiarity with the business. Even the terminology is difficult, so it would be hard to have to explain things about the industry over and over again.
  • A partner that does independent preparation and doesn’t rely exclusively on us to provide everything because they’ve done their homework.
  • Good problem-solving skills. Marketing and market research is basically just problem solving, and that manifests itself in even trying to design a research study. We need a partner that’s constantly asking: what’s the best way to do this?
  • Creative sample design. We sometimes have difficulty reaching certain audiences because we’re limited by our geographic footprint in western PA. So, finding a partner that can suggest alternatives for reliable ways of getting the same level of information is a huge component of what we need in a partner.
  • Visual interpretation of data is another one. That’s an art and a science, and partners who know how to show you information in a visual way are extremely helpful because that’s usually how it gets delivered to senior management, which is much easier to access than large, detailed crosstabs. 

These are all things we have working with you, and of course, we’ve had many years working together, so you know us very well and that familiarity is very helpful.

Got a market research question that you're just dying to have answered? Ask our Chief Methodologist and VP of Advanced Analytics, and he might tackle your question in his next blog!

Ask Dr. Jay!  

Topics: healthcare research, health insurance research, Researchers in Residence

Is Uber Living Its Brand Promise?

Posted by Tara Lasker

Thu, Apr 21, 2016

The Uber experience continues to fascinate me with each ride. I pepper my drivers with questions about Uber’s business model, their experience as a driver, and how satisfied they are driving for the sometimes controversial ride-share company. It’s a topic I also bring up around friends, family, and colleagues, and I always come back to the same question: where does Uber win and lose in the minds of end-customers?

I took a look at Uber’s brand promises to see if those promises aligned with my own experiences (as well as the experiences of other people I’ve talked to.) Below, you’ll find Uber’s promises to riders:

uber-2.png

  • Tap a button, get a ride. It’s so nice to be able to request a ride from Uber with one tap and have a clear expectation of when my driver will be there and what my ride will cost. I appreciate having my driver’s information as well as the license plate number on hand.

Verdict? Uber delivers in a big way on this promise. 

  • No cash, no tip, no hassle. Until recently, I thought this was true, and I loved Uber for it. I appreciated that everything was linked to my account and that I didn’t need to fumble around my wallet in a dark car at the end of my ride. I asked a driver about this a little while ago, and I was surprised to learn that not only are tips not included in the fare, but Uber has also begun taking a higher percentage from each ride. I researched this after I got home and saw that the driver was right: tips are not included. The more I researched, the more I realized that I was not the only one who had this misconception.

Verdict? Uber says there’s no need to tip, but it’s not explicitly stated that tips aren’t included in the ride cost at all. There’s a lot of confusion surrounding this issue. Since I now know that tips aren’t included, I plan on tipping my driver out of pocket, which reintroduces the problem of fumbling around in my wallet at the end of a ride. This is an issue that could make me to switch to a competitor (perhaps Lyft, which allows you to tip in the app). In my opinion, Uber owes its drivers (aka “partners”) and its customers clarification on why “there’s no need for a tip.” 

  • You rate, we listen. This might just be my personal misconception, but given that it seems that anyone can drive for Uber, safety is a concern. This steers me in the direction of cabs when I’m alone because I perceive them to be better regulated. However, if I’m with my husband or friends, I’m much more apt to take an Uber for the value. I have colleagues who consider Uber as (if not more safe) than a cab since all rides are tracked via GPS and riders have the driver’s picture and information as well as the vehicle’s information at their fingertips. Every week, it feels like there’s a new story about an assault on an Uber rider or driver, which can make taking an Uber feel like riding at your own risk. So, what about the rating? Does it help? Just like an eBay seller, do positive evaluations help communicate safety?

Verdict? I’m mixed. I’m still not convinced that Uber is any more or less safe than its alternatives. However, as a data nerd, I do appreciate having data on my driver when I request a ride.

Uber filled a much needed void when it launched in 2009. But as the company continues to grow, the promises it makes to customers don’t always ring true. The fix? Implementing a customer measurement system, which will ensure that the company delivers on these brand promises and doesn’t steer off the road of success. 

Tara is a Research Director at CMB. She enjoys nights out in the city with her husband and grilling her Uber driver on the way home.

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Topics: travel and hospitality research, brand health and positioning, customer experience and loyalty

What We’ve Got Here Is a Respondent Experience Problem

Posted by Jared Huizenga

Thu, Apr 14, 2016

respondent experience problemA couple weeks ago, I was traveling to Austin for CASRO’s Digital Research Conference, and I had an interesting conversation while boarding the plane. [Insert Road Trip joke here.]

Stranger: First time traveling to Austin?

Me: Yeah, I’m going to a market research conference.

Stranger: [blank stare]

Me: It’s a really good conference. I go every year.

Stranger: So, what does your company do?

Me: We gather information from people—usually by having them take an online survey, and—

Stranger: I took one of those. Never again.

Me: Yeah? It was that bad?

Stranger: It was [expletive] horrible. They said it would take ten minutes, and I quit after spending twice that long on it. I got nothing for my time. They basically lied to me.

Me: I’m sorry you had that experience. Not all surveys are like that, but I totally understand why you wouldn’t want to take another one.

Thank goodness the plane started boarding before he could say anything else. Double thank goodness that I wasn’t sitting next to him during the flight.

I’ve been a proud member of the market research industry since 1998. I feel like it’s often the Rodney Dangerfield of professional services, but I’ve always preached about how important the industry is. Unfortunately, I’m finding it harder and harder to convince the general population. The experience my fellow traveler had with his survey points to a major theme of this year’s CASRO Digital Research Conference. Either directly or indirectly, many of the presentations this year were about the respondent experience. It’s become increasingly clear to me that the market research industry has no choice other than to address the respondent experience “problem.”

There were also two related sub-themes—generational differences and living in a digital world—that go hand-in-hand with the respondent experience theme. Fewer people are taking questionnaires on their desktop computers. Recent data suggests that, depending on the specific study, 20-30% of respondents are taking questionnaires on their smartphones. Not surprisingly, this skews towards younger respondents. Also not surprisingly, the percentage of smartphone survey takers is increasing at a rapid pace. Within the next two years, I predict the percent of smartphone respondents will be 35-40%. As researchers, we have to consider the mobile respondent when designing questionnaires.

From a practical standpoint, what does all this mean for researchers like me who are focused on data collection?

  1. I made a bold—and somewhat unpopular—prediction a few years ago that the method of using a single “panel” for market research sample is dying a slow death and that these panels would eventually become obsolete. We may not be quite at that point yet, but we’re getting closer. In my experience, being able to use a single sample source today is very rare except for the simplest of populations.

Action: Understand your sample source options. Have candid conversations with your data collection partners and only work with ones that are 100% transparent. Learn how to smell BS from a mile away, and stay away from those people.

  1. As researchers, part of our job should be to understand how the world around us is changing. So, why do we turn a blind eye to the poor experiences our respondents are having? According to CASRO’s Code of Standards and Ethics, “research participants are the lifeblood of the research industry.” The people taking our questionnaires aren’t just “completes.” They’re people. They have jobs, spouses, children, and a million other things going on in their lives at any given time, so they often don’t have time for your 30-minute questionnaire with ten scrolling grid questions.

Action: Take the questionnaires yourself so you can fully understand what you’re asking your respondents to do. Then take that same questionnaire on a smartphone. It might be an eye opener.

  1. It’s important to educate colleagues, peers, and clients regarding the pitfalls of poor data collection methods. Not only does a poorly designed 30-minute survey frustrate respondents, it also leads to speeding, straight lining, and just not caring. Most importantly, it leads to bad data. It’s not the respondent’s fault—it’s ours. One company stood up at the conference and stated that it won’t take a client project if the survey is too long. But for every company that does this, there are many others that will take that project.

Action: Educate your clients about the potential consequences of poorly designed, lengthy questionnaires. Market research industry leaders as a whole need to do this for it have a large impact.

Change is a good thing, and there’s no need to panic. Most of you are probably aware of the issues I’ve outlined above. There are no big shocks here. But, being cognizant of a problem and acting to fix the problem are two entirely different things. I challenge everyone in the market research industry to take some action. In fact, you don’t have much of a choice.

Jared is CMB’s Field Services Director, and has been in market research industry for eighteen years. When he isn’t enjoying the exciting world of data collection, he can be found competing at barbecue contests as the pitmaster of the team Insane Swine BBQ.

Topics: data collection, mobile, research design, conference recap

Upcoming Webinar: Busting the Millennial Insurance Myth

Posted by Lori Vellucci

Thu, Apr 07, 2016

millennials and insuranceFree for 40 minutes next Wednesday? Join us for a webinar that will explore Millennial attitudes and behaviors toward insurance!

Insights will include:

  • A segmentation of Millennials revealing five distinct personas with varied brand preferences, attitudes, and behaviors
  • What Millennials expect and want from insurers and how to spur adoption
  • Key differences among younger (21-25) and older (26-30) Millennials
  • Profiles of high-value segments and how best to reach them
  • A comparison of generational expectations of mobile technology and applications
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 13th @ 12:30 EST
Speaker: Lori Vellucci, Account Director, Chadwick Martin Bailey
 
See you Wednesday!
Watch here!

Topics: insurance research, webinar

CMB Employee Spotlight: Andy Cole, Strategy Consultant

Posted by Heather Magaw

Wed, Mar 30, 2016

Andy_Cole_Chadwick Martin Bailey.jpgEarlier this year, CMB proudly introduced our new Consulting and Research Services team (CRS). This team is an extension of our long-term commitment to extending the reach of traditional market research through strategic consulting services. To better understand this team’s unique contributions to client engagements, I sat down one of our strategy consultants, Andy Cole. 

Andy, thanks for taking the time out of your day to connect. Can you tell me a little about your professional background and experiences? 

In a word, I would describe my career as “varied” or “diverse,” but most people look at my background and wonder if I have a problem sitting still. I’m originally trained as a mechanical engineer, and I started out doing R&D projects involving aerospace with Google, non-emissive fuels with the EPA, military-focused brain trauma with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), and vehicle collision forensics (with a small, lesser-known engineering company). My first regular job had me working for a large alternative energy company that would send me all over North America to climb 300-meter industrial wind turbines to figure out why they were offline, design temporary solutions to get them up and running ASAP, and work with R&D in Denmark to develop a permanent fix for systemic issues. 

I’m not sure if that meets anyone else’s definition of a regular job. So, how did you get from scaling wind turbines to a career in strategic consulting and research? 

I realized that I had a strong interest in business and management, so I got my MBA and began consulting with large, small, and non-profit organizations on a wide range of topics, including social media marketing, energy, executive training programs, and product development. I also launched two successful businesses in the innovation marketplace, helping large corporations rapidly develop new technologies and discover emerging markets, which was a great adventure but lacked the lifestyle I was ultimately looking for. 

I value diverse experiences because the most innovative solutions are borrowed from other industries and combined or repurposed in a new way. To me, this is the difference between being a true partner who can “connect the dots” versus a consultant who simply knows the best practices in a given industry. Clients don’t hire CMB if they’re just looking for best practices—we recommend a Google search for that purpose. 

Given your unique line of sight, in your opinion, what's the greatest opportunity facing businesses today that a research-based consulting engagement could support? 

There is an enormous trend in companies turning from sales-focused strategies to customer-centric design. When you hear companies embracing things like user experience, VOC, pivoting, and iterating, it’s all about observing and listening to customers, making constant measurements, testing new concepts in the market, etc. That all just screams for custom research. 

When companies are looking to become more customer-centric, they have to have a deep understanding of the target market that is backed by market information and unique insights. This is a huge opportunity for businesses to gain an advantage over their competition, and it’s truly CMB’s sweet spot. 

It seems that more and more consultants are embracing the impact of research. What’s your take on the role of research in the future of business consulting? 

The bottom line is that companies are looking for clear and confident strategic direction, and the language of today’s business is increasingly metric-oriented. It’s not enough for consultants to simply say that customers will like an idea or that a decision will result in greater revenues. The savvy business leader needs to know exactly how much more preferable a concept is and exactly how much revenue they should expect compared to taking an alternative path. Smart clients don’t trust advice without evidence to support it, and that is exactly what research provides. Good research forms the foundation on which effective strategies are built. 

Can you provide an example of a recent client engagement that blurred the lines of delineation between market research and strategic consulting? 

With the Affordable Care Act shaking up the entire healthcare industry, a large national insurance carrier saw an opportunity to use intimate knowledge of customer journey experiences and expectations to figure out which stages and channels were most influential (and would therefore pose the greatest marketing opportunity). Furthermore, the company wanted to know what messaging resonated with individual customers at each stage and within each channel, so it could be sure that marketing efforts would be as effective as possible.  

To tackle this ambiguous challenge, we took a multi-pronged and multi-phased approach: 

  1. A qualitative phase—involving in-depth interviews and moderated online discussion boards—to surface key stages, channels, and underlying context from the customer journey.
  2. A facilitated workshop with stakeholders and decision-makers to discuss key findings/insights and hypotheses, brainstorm potential solutions, and align on the path forward.
  3. A quantitative phase to reveal what individual customers value most throughout their experience and to identify which experiences have the potential to be particularly influential in the decision to purchase. 

It’s great when you get the opportunity to really dig in to that level of detail. What did you learn? 

At the conclusion of the project, we not only identified a number of surprising marketing opportunities by disproving a few fundamental assumptions, but we also validated (and put to rest) several long-standing hypotheses that were a stagnating source of internal debate. We also collaborated with the client to identify creative messaging campaigns that directly aligned with the trends stemming from our research as well as with the organization’s overarching strategic objectives. 

I look forward to hearing about more projects like this one that blur the lines in the future. Thanks again for taking time out of your day, Andy. 

Heather Magaw is the Vice President of Client Services at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has never climbed a wind turbine in her life. . .and never intends to.

Andy Cole is a Consultant at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has already left the interview to go investigate three seemingly unrelated things. 

Learn more about our strategy consulting expertise.

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, strategy consulting, healthcare research, business decisions, growth and innovation, customer journey

Dear Dr. Jay: Discrete Choice—How Many Is Too Many Features?

Posted by Dr. Jay Weiner

Wed, Mar 23, 2016

Dear Dr. Jay,

I’m interested in testing a large number of features for inclusion in the next version of my product. My team is suggesting that we need to cull the list down to a smaller set of items to run a choice model. Are there ways to test a large set of attributes in a choice model?

-Nick


 DRJAY.pngHi Nick –

There are a number of ways to test a large set of attributes in choice modeling. Most of the time, when we test a large number of features, many are simply binary attributes (included/not included). While this makes the experimental design larger, it’s not quite as bad as having ten six-level attributes. If the description is short enough, you might go ahead and just include all of them. If you’re concerned about how much reading a respondent will need to do—or you really wouldn’t offer a respondent 12 additional perks for choosing your credit card—you could put a cap on the number of additional features any specific offer includes. For example, you could test 15 new features in a single model, but respondents would only get up to 5 at any single time. This is actually better than using a partial profile design as all respondents would see all offers. 

Another option is to do some sort of bridging study where you test all of the features using a max diff task. You can include a subset of the factors in a DCM and then use the max diff utilities to compute the utility for the full list of features in the DCM. This allows you to include the full set of features in your simulation tool.

Dr. Jay loves designing really big, complex choice models.  With over 20 years of DCM experience, he’s never met a design challenge he couldn’t solve. 

Topics: advanced analytics, product development, Dear Dr. Jay

CMB Conference Recap: ARF Re!Think16

Posted by Julie Kurd

Thu, Mar 17, 2016

Re-Think-2016.jpgRon Amram of Heineken uttered the three words that sum up my ARF #ReThink16 experience: science, storytelling, and seconds. Let’s recap some of the most energizing insights: 

  • Science: Using Data to Generate Insights
    • AT&T Mobility’s Greg Pharo talked about how AT&T measures the impact of mass and digital advertising. They start with a regression and integrate marketing variables (media weight, impressions, GRPs, brand and message recall, WoM, etc.) as well as information on major product launches, distribution, and competitive data, topped off with macroeconomic data and internal operational data such as quality (network functioning, etc.).
    • GfK’s voice analytics research actually records respondents’ voices and captures voice inflection, which predicts new idea or new product success by asking a simple question: “What do you think about this product and why?” They explore sentiment by analyzing respondents’ speech for passion, activation, and whether they’d purchase. I had to ask a question: since I have a sunny and positive personality, wouldn’t my voice always sound to a machine as though I like every product? Evidently, no. They establish each individual respondent’s baseline and measure the change.  
    • Nielsen talked about its new 40 ad normative benchmark (increasing soon to 75) and how it uses a multi-method approach—a mix of medical grade EEG, eye tracking, facial coding, biometrics, and self-reporting—to get a full view of reactions to advertising. 
  • Storytelling: Using Creative That’s Personal
    • Doug Ziewacz (Head of North America Digital Media and Advertising for Under Armour Connected Fitness) spoke about the ecosystem of connected health and fitness. It’s not enough to just receive a notification that you’ve hit your 10,000 steps—many people are looking for community and rewards.
    • Tell your story. I saw several presentations that covered how companies ensure that potential purchasers view a product’s advertising and how companies are driving interest from target audiences.
      • Heineken, for example, knows that 50% of its 21-34 year-old male target don’t even drink beer, so they focus on telling stories to the other 50%. The company’s research shows that most male beer drinkers are sort of loyal to a dozen beer brands, with different preferences for different occasions. Ron Amram (VP of Media at Heineken) talked about the need to activate people with their beer for the right occasion. 
      • Manvir Kalsi, Senior Manager of Innovation Process and Research at Samsung, said that Samsung spends ~$3B in advertising globally. With such a large footprint, they often end up adding impressions for people who will never be interested in the product. Now, the company focuses on reaching entrenched Apple consumers with messages (such as long battery life) that might not resonate with Samsung loyalists but will hit Apple users hard and give those Apple users reasons to believe in Samsung. 
  • Seconds: Be Responsive Enough to Influence the Purchase Decision Funnel
    • Nathalie Bordes from ESPN talked about sub-second ad exposure effectiveness. She spoke frankly about how exposure time is no longer the most meaningful part of ad recall for mobile scrolling or static environments. In fact, 36% of audience recalled an ad with only half a second of exposure. There was 59% recall in 1 second and 78% recall in 2 seconds. Point being, every time we have to wait 4 or 5 seconds before clicking “skip ad” on YouTube, our brains really are taking in those ads.
    • Laura Bernstein from Symphony Advanced Media discussed the evolution of Millennials’ video viewing habits. Symphony is using measurement technology among its panel of 15,000 viewers who simply install an app and then keep their phones charged and near them, allowing the app to passively collect cross-platform data. A great example of leveraging the right tech for the right audience.

How does your company use science and storytelling to drive business growth?

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Topics: storytelling, marketing science, advertising, data integration, conference recap

Getting Your Customers Beyond Price

Posted by Cara Lousararian

Tue, Mar 15, 2016

online_shopping.jpgCall me lazy or call me smart, but I now do nearly all of my gift shopping online. Shopping online is easy, but it also brings up a whole new question around loyalty to specific brands and retailers. Five to ten years ago, I felt like getting the best price/deal was more important to me than shopping for specific brands or at specific retailers. Maybe it’s because I’m older, earn more money, or buy for more people (hello, in-laws!), but I’ve started considering other things than just price, such as:

  • Return policy timeline. A 2 week return policy doesn’t cater to the super-organized planners (like me) who want to buy presents well in advance
  • Ease of returns. A gift that can’t be easily returned is an inconvenience, so I look for retailers with hassle-free returns
  • Product warranty or guarantee. Sure things break, but I definitely don’t want my recipient to pay for a replacement

Because you can’t feel, touch, or smell products that you buy online, other factors play a much more important role in the decision making process—I’ll pay a higher price for something just because I know the store and its policies are convenient for me and those that I’m shopping for. We’ve all gotten that ugly sweater without a gift receipt. No one wants to be “the bad gift giver” (sounds like a Seinfeld thing, right?).

Two retailers who get my business, despite the higher price tag, are Nordstrom and L.L. Bean. Here’s why they have my loyalty:

  • Last Christmas, I participated in a Secret Santa gift exchange with my husband’s family, and I was assigned my husband’s 25-year-old cousin. While I could have just bought him a Patriots t-shirt, I wanted to be more creative and thoughtful. I went to Nordstrom.com because of their superior return policy—they take anything back at any time. This allowed me to take more of a gamble on choosing his present because he could easily return or exchange it if he didn’t like it.
  • My sweet rescue dog, Nala, has an obsession with trying to “soften” her bed (i.e., paw at it repeatedly with her sharp nails). I’ve had her for 6 years, and I have lost count of the number of beds I’ve had to buy to replace ones that she’s ripped to shreds. I took a look at L.L. Bean’s dog beds because I know the store’s return policy and product guarantee rivals most other stores. I had a bit of sticker shock when I realized I would be spending $200 on a bed for my dog, but the extra expense was worth it knowing that I can return or exchange the bed at any time for I know that L.L. Bean will stand behind the product and will replace it at no additional cost to me. 

Online shopping has made it easy to switch brands/retailers with the click of a button, and this undoubtedly has an impact on customer loyalty. In this world of information overload, it’s becoming harder and harder for brands and retailers to truly differentiate their offerings, especially when they lack a captive audience in their physical store locations. 

This is where discrete choice modeling and/or segmentation can come in handy—especially when there’s a need to dive deeper into uncovering purchase drivers outside of price—since most consumers will tell you they want all of the product’s bells and whistles for the lowest possible price. At CMB, we spend a lot of time in the up-front design phase, as well as in the analysis phase, combining the art and science of research to help bring the customer journey to life. This is where proper questionnaire design trumps speed as we strive to keep the story and research insights at the forefront. 

How are you prioritizing customer convenience and experience?   

Cara is a Senior Research Manager at CMB and plans to buy stock in Nordstrom and L.L. Bean after reviewing her recent credit card transactions.

Our new Consumer Pulse study explores Millennial attitudes and behaviors toward banking and finance.

Download the full report here!

Topics: customer experience and loyalty, market strategy and segmentation, retail research

What Winning Really Means in the Corporate World

Posted by Judy Melanson

Wed, Mar 09, 2016

photo by lincolnblues on FlickrWhen I watched this year’s Academy Awards, I celebrated with the rest of Hollywood when—after six previous losses—Leonardo DiCaprio won his first Oscar. USA Today reported: “It was an arduous journey for DiCaprio himself getting to the Oscars stage and taking a winning lap, but he got there. And for now at least, undoubtedly, he is king of the world.” King of the World. The Winner. 

All this talk about “winning” (given the Oscars and the political primary season) has me thinking about what it takes to be a winner in the corporate world. To win in a crowded field, you must:

  • Be excellent: Winners consistently perform better than competitors. They understand the importance of skill, practice, training. . .and maybe a little bit of luck!
  • Be different: Winners capitalize on their unique strengths to propel themselves forward and stand out from competitors.
  • Take risks: Living a life of safety and conformity may be really comfortable, but winners push the envelope, try different things, and take paths that others don’t.
  • Surround themselves with a high-performing team: In every category—sports, entertainment, business, etc.—winners are supported by a group of committed, talented colleagues.
  • Project confidence: Winners expect to win. They project confidence in their body language, posture, tone, and words. 

For those of us executives and managers without a golden statue, medal, or election, how can we tell if we’re winning?  

In business, we frequently use sports—and war—metaphors to describe our activities and accomplishments. We hit a home run with a new ad campaign. We battle for market share. But, the definition of winning varies by industry and company. For some, it can be measured by stock price/performance; for others, it’s measured by market share. But the focus on market share, in a rapidly changing environment, can mean that you’re the winner in a market that’s shrinking or disappearing altogether. 

Unlike a single metric, a balanced scorecard—aligned with the future success of your organization and considering multiple metrics (financial, customer, employee, and operational)—may provide a better assessment of organizational “winning.” 

ralph waldo emerson success quoteFor most of us, there is no finish line. Because of this, we all have to individually define what success means to us in our current job. From my perspective, in addition to executing on the core requirements of our jobs, success means that we are continually:

  • Improving: Always developing, learning, and evolving our skills
  • Contributing: Supporting the financial success of our firms
  • Purposeful: Acting with passion, genuine interest, and excitement   

On my bureau, I have a framed copy of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s definition of success. I will never win an Academy Award or Gold Medal, but I will be successful, and I will be a winner.    

Shall I start writing my acceptance speech? 

Judy leads the Travel and Entertainment Practice and has a red carpet dress picked out just in case she gets nominated in the future.   

Our new Consumer Pulse study explores Millennial attitudes and behaviors toward banking and finance.

Download the full report here!

Topics: consumer insights