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CMB Conference Recap: Uncovering Innovation - the Clay Street Project at P&G

Posted by Ed Loessi

Mon, May 23, 2016

Light_bulb_with_plant.jpgThis month, I had the opportunity to attend the Front End of Innovation conference here in Boston. One of the most exciting keynote addresses was provided by Karen Hershenson, Leader of the Clay Street Project at Procter & Gamble (P&G) and was titled Innovation from the Inside-Out. The idea of innovation from the inside-out is especially intriguing to me, because CMB has committed to extensive efforts in product development and innovation. We’ve formed an innovation group within the company—drawing participation from people all across the organization. Having been involved in innovation programs for the better part of 10 years, I've learned innovation is not a one-size fit all proposition and that it’s essential to learn from other leaders and companies about how they harness innovation within their organizations. Karen’s story and ideas did not disappoint.

5 Key Lessons from the Clay Street Project:

Karen leads a team of designers, educators, and marketers that solve innovation challenges for P&G brands and noncompetitive Fortune 500 companies. The group—the Clay Street Project—was formed in 2004 and has been instrumental in building innovation teams, individual innovation and creative skills, and impacting many P&G brands. The group is often tasked to solve problems that keep their leaders up at night, addressing cross-business-unit challenges, and looking at entirely new products, or processes that have hit roadblocks.

Karen highlighted some of the key things that drive the delivery of innovation for Clay Street and P&G including:

  • Use a defining question – “How might we?”: I found this to be an excellent question because it's entirely open-ended, it doesn’t pre-suppose or seek to direct a particular path, it just asks “how” and lets the person take that first step.
  • Create the conditions, innovation from the inside out: This is essential. Innovation is not something that can be mandated. Innovation is something you seed, water, nurture, and see what happens, course correcting along the way. On their website, Clay Street notes that innovation is a by-product of work, team, and systems and that many organizations make the mistake of focusing on only one of those, which kills the entire process.
  • “All practitioners of innovation have a process, and we're no different”: I, in particular, liked this idea. I could clearly see the team has a process, but it’s an open process. The process of starting with the right question and creating conditions, which seems a bit fluid, are in fact a process. It’s just that the process doesn’t dictate how you work, nor does it say that your challenge can be solved using this templated idea. By letting the team figure these things out on their own, it’s more likely they’ll learn the lessons and that knowledge will stay with them as they move out into the organization.
  • Help teams deliver better long-term value: Ultimately, this is the mission of the Clay Street Project. Innovation impacts so many areas within a company, and there are many individual measures along the way, but in the end, it’s about better long-term value.
  • Understand your environment: As a global company, P&G requires deep consumer insight and long product pipelines filled with solutions for many different types of customers. The types of innovation that P&G need are different from other companies. There are many innovation methods and philosophies to embrace, but you must choose the ones that match your company’s culture and customer environment.

I saw many things within Clay Street’s guiding principles that are relevant to CMB. In particular, the need to create the conditions for innovation. As a company, CMB has been innovating for three+ decades; we may not have always called it innovation, but we have now put a stake in the ground, and we are calling it out, putting resources towards harnessing innovation as a defining principle. We are clear in our minds that innovation is how we are going to create long-term value for our clients and the company. Finally, we understand our environment, which is part of a rapidly changing service and information industry. Market research is being impacted by technology, changing service models, big data, and client competition. Our need for innovation has its drivers, but I could see that it has many of the same requirements as those of a larger multi-national company like P&G.

Ed is the Director of Product Development and Innovation at CMB. He thinks there is a game changing product or idea within everyone and it’s his job to dig it out. You can share ideas with him @edloessi

Topics: product development, consumer insights, growth and innovation

CMB Conference Recap: NEMRA’s Spring 2016 Conference

Posted by Ashley Harrington and Brian Jones

Thu, May 19, 2016

nemra-logo.gifLast week, we spent the day at the New England Market Research Association’s (NEMRA) Spring 2016 Conference, learning from colleagues in the region, both on the corporate research and consultant/provider side of the business. There was a lot to take in, but a few ideas particularly stuck out to us:

  1. Embrace Agility: A session on the lessons we can learn from startups challenged us to dismiss existing perceptions of “agile” research as simply “fast and cheap.” Instead, he encouraged us to think about market research agility in terms of being flexible, working smarter, and challenging the industry or process-related status quo (without sacrificing data integrity).
  2. Be Consultative: While “faster” and “cheaper” are often king, we also have an opportunity to be better by being more consultative (which is critical to CMB’s approach). A panel of corporate researchers at the conference underscored the importance of research partners being more consultative by:
  • Developing a better understanding of how researching findings will be used. If findings are going to be used primarily to convince a C-level executive of one key point, a one-pager should be included in the report that addresses that point clearly and concisely.
  • Telling the story and delivering insights—not just “data dumps.” While the panel acknowledged that the research team may want the 100-page report for their own edification, a project is only successful when the data is socialized and shared off-team. We have the opportunity to help organizations do that. 
  1. Evolve: A speaker on mobile data collection and another on gamifying research encouraged us to consider instances when incorporating new tools might help us better solve our clients’ research problems. For example, there’s an exciting opportunity to capture real-time path-to-purchase data with mobile, in-the-moment research. With gamified questions in an A&U study, we can help better engage respondents and collect richer data (e.g., asking respondents to play a game in which they enter words to try to get another respondent to name a brand—think Catchphrase for a brand study). In both cases, it’s important that we stay at the forefront of what’s new and useful in the industry without forgetting to apply the same critical thinking and rigor to any “new” tools that we do to the tried-and-true ones.

What innovative approaches to research have you been exploring?

Ashley Harrington is a Senior Project Manager who leads projects for world-leading financial services brands. Outside of work and attending conferences, she enjoys managing the ultimate project a10-month old baby boy.

Brian Jones is a Senior Project Manager at CMB. He enjoys the sharing of ideas among peers at events like NEMRA’s Spring Conference.

Topics: strategy consulting, conference recap

CMB Conference Recap: IIR’s Front End of Innovation

Posted by Heather Magaw and Jen Golden

Wed, May 18, 2016

Front-End-of-Innovation.pngOne of our favorite speakers at the Front End of Innovation Conference (FEI) this year was Greg Brandeau, former EVP and CTO at The Walt Disney Studios and former SVP at Pixar. His talk centered on a book he co-authored called Collective Genius, which provides insight on how to create a culture of innovation in business. He presented a simple, yet compelling, definition of innovation: any change that is both novel and useful. It can be any type of change—a business process, an approach to customer service, a new product idea, or an old idea applied in a new way. 

As he was speaking, we were struck by how many of his key points aligned with themes from an all-company meeting we had both attended earlier in the day. CMB is constantly looking for ways to continue innovating across our organization, so perhaps that’s why this speaker resonated with us. Here are a few key takeaways:   

  • Decision-focused point-of-view: In order to be innovative, a business must have a focused point-of-view that drives towards a specific objective. Creating alignment within innovatively driven organizations can be challenging, but necessary. This enables all employees to work toward the same goal and take the risks to get there. 
  • No one walks on water: Greg debunked the myth that innovation is an idea or solution that comes all at once to a single person. The reality is that innovation is a team sport, which involves gathering ideas, gaining knowledge, doing research, getting feedback, evolving the ideas, etc. Everyone in the organization has something to offer, and it’s the leader’s job to identify what that is. Need an example? When Vineet Nayar took over India-based HCL, he admitted that he didn’t know exactly how to set up the struggling brand for success, so he pulled together a team of young employees and told them to come up with a plan. By embracing a new style of leadership, the company’s sales increased dramatically over the next few years.    
  • Collaboration is key: Creating a genuine sense of community is necessary for nurturing innovation. Community exists at the intersection of a shared purpose, shared values, and rules of engagement within the organization that define how individuals and teams behave, interact, and think about solutions. Truly innovative groups are able to elicit and combine members’ separate slices of genius into a collective one. 
  • Learning culture: During Greg’s career at Pixar, he spoke of a time when they nearly lost all the data from Toy Story 2. Since Greg was ultimately in charge of making sure something like this did not happen, he immediately went to Steve Jobs and turned in his resignation letter, assuming he would be fired. Steve didn’t accept it, however, reasoning that Greg had learned from his error and that it would set a bad example within the organization if someone was fired over a mistake. The takeaway? Employees might be less likely to try something new or take a chance in the future if they’re constantly worried about the possible repercussions of failure.

Tomorrow’s leaders are tasked with driving—not just executing— innovation. The leaders that will be most successful at evolving their organizations will be those who:

  • Shape the context for their employees, rather than mandate the direction
  • Amplify, rather than minimize, differences among employees and their teams
  • Create communities of people who innovate rather than expect employees to be followers who execute 

At CMB, we’re willing to take chances (on ideas and employees), which ultimately leads to a committed culture that is striving to be better. Is your company? 

Heather Magaw is the VP of Client Services. This was her first year attending the Front End of Innovation Conference, but it won’t be her last. They hooked her with the fresh fruit infused water as well as the host of great speakers. 

Jen Golden is a Project Manager on the Tech/e-Commerce team. This was also her first time at FEI, and she was happy to hear that almost losing all the Toy Story 2 data helped foster creativity at Pixar, which enabled the creation of characters like Wall-E, Dory, and Mike Wazowski.

Come innovate with us!

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Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, conference recap, growth and innovation

CMB Conference Recap: Yale’s Customer Insights Conference

Posted by Julie Kurd

Wed, May 11, 2016

Logo_Yale.jpgA hidden gem of a Consumer Insights conference, the Yale Customer Insights Conference is great for researchers seeking advanced quantitative methodological thinking. This conference is a rare mix of business and academia. Well-known PhDs came from Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and Wash U to share their research and findings. Not to be outdone, mega-brand thinkers from companies including Spotify, Vail Resorts, Viacom, and REI also came to share their insights. Here are a few key takeaways:

  • Peter Fader discussed how Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) drives business forward. He had an abundance of wondrously specific cases, including how Starbucks is shifting from knowing your “usual” locally to knowing your “usual” virtually so that you’re able to have a personal and frictionless experience no matter where you are. In other words, Starbucks has become “a CRM company that monetizes through coffee.” This attempt to understand what each customer wants/needs at the atom level is a prime example of what Starbucks is obsessing over (and it’s not the next roast).
  • Kirsten Lynch, the CMO of Vail Resorts, focuses on the emotion and passion of Vail’s very specific target audience. The company’s segmentation scheme directly feeds everything they do. The target customers are not just pedestrian affluent—they are significantly wealthy, with average household incomes of $280k, so the customer mindset is very focused on exclusivity and excitement (vs discounts). When guests return to one of the resorts, everything they do is tracked in the Vail app: ski runs, where they dine, the people they’re with, etc. Like Starbucks, the data again is available at that atomized level, which not only allows Vail Resorts to personalize the experience for the guest, but also allows Vail’s leadership to assess strategic assets and ask: what do we need next? Another lift or another restaurant? Where do we need it, and why?
  • Spotify took all of the data it collected last year and used it on a “Year in Music” campaign, which was not only able to give each subscriber a recap of his/her year in music, but also able to give specific countries and zip codes information on the most popular songs/albums in that area. Fun fact: Eric Solomon, Director of Global Brand Strategy for Spotify, shared that Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” was the most popular song last year in Williamsburg, one of NYC’s trendiest neighborhoods (can Beliebers be trendy?). People now listen to more than 40 hours of music in a week (yes, that’s the level of a full time job), and Spotify is using this data to segment by mood states (party, focus, sleep, workout, etc.) instead of by genre.
  • Ross Martin, Viacom’s EVP of Market Strategy and Entertainment, talked about how the company is moving passive fans to active “super” fans and discussed the shift from selling impressions to engagement. How can brands acknowledge and celebrate these super fans? Martin shared an example of a Millennial asking Viacom if he could make Ninja Turtle cuff links (a potential trademark violation) for his wedding. Viacom not only approved the use, but actually manufactured the cufflinks and sent them to the entire wedding party for an experiential point of connection with its influential fan base (which was an earned media opportunity for sure).
  • Michel Tuan Pham from Columbia Business School discussed how feelings and emotions affect our judgments and decisions. Whether there’s a “like” button or the option to give something a rating (e.g. 5 stars), people derive pleasure from the act of liking or rating something. His research found that even when there are no stakes and no decisions to be made, people like to “like.” His research examines motivation (narcissism) for these “likes”—and he concludes that as marketers, you should emphasize the “you” when asking customers to “tell others how YOU feel about Product X” because it’s more narcissistic than altruistically motivated.

Be sure to add this conference to your calendar for next year, and we’ll see you there.

Julie blogs for GreenBook, ResearchAccess, and CMB. She’s an inspired participant, amplifier, socializer, and spotter in the twitter #mrx community, so talk research with her @julie1research.

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Topics: consumer insights, conference recap, brand health and positioning, digital media and entertainment research

Boaty McBoatface: Social Media Meets Market Research on the Cyber Seas

Posted by Brian Jones

Mon, May 02, 2016

Boaty_McBoatface.pngIn case you missed it, the UK’s Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) asked a silly question on a serious topic, and the cyber seas responded in kind. News media and bloggers converged in viral fashion and grabbed the opportunity to steer the campaign on their own course. I put my market research cap on and joined the flotilla. 

Background on the Buzz

On March 17th, the NERC agency launched a campaign to promote the future launch of their newest and largest research ship, designed to carry scientists and their equipment to the earth’s Polar Regions. Their #NameOurShip campaign invited the public to submit name ideas, and it quickly caught on as an opinion poll. The cyber buzz really unfolded after a public relations professional suggested the name “Boaty McBoatface” upon seeing other silly names people had posted, and the name sailed to the top of the boards. On April 16th, NERC pulled the plug on collecting votes, and a NERC spokesperson stressed that there is no guarantee the ship would be named after the winning entry because the final decision will be made by the chief executive of the organization.    

What I Learned from Those Influenced by the Campaign

The #NameOurShip campaign was hugely successful in emotionally engaging the public, despite the backlash to NERC scuttling the winning name. People left waves of comments for NERC’s leadership to surf through.  

“The only reason I ever heard of this is because of the name controversy. Far more people are likely to stay interested in Boaty McBoatface than some humdrum 'sensible' name, because it has already been adopted as a kind of maritime national pet.” (Comment posted on one of the many Boaty Blogs)

 The comments made for an interesting read, and I came up with a few takeaways. 

  1. There is a deserving national identity with heroic British polar explorers that would look great in large letters on the transom of a $300 million research ship, e.g., the “RRS Henry Worsely” (15,774 votes). Henry Worsely died in January while attempting to complete the first solo and unaided crossing of the Antarctic—just 30 miles short after crossing 900 miles in 71 days. 
  1. Beneath the veneer of the online pranksters and goofballs who posted votes for names like “Ice, Ice Baby” (3,673 votes) and “Boatimus Prime” (8,365 votes), the public clearly wants a memorable name that makes a global statement about British identity, and for some, that’s a whimsical endeavor. 
  1. For some, “Boaty McBoatface” (124,109 votes) presents an opportunity to do public good on the behalf of NERC’s commitment to the pursuit in education in science. The “RRS Dora the Polar Explorer” (983 votes) might not get smirks from scientists performing serious research, but mom and dad might have a more favorable impression of NERC if their child’s bath toy had “NERC” and “Boaty” logos on it. 
  1. Interestingly, very few online posts revealed interest or concern with NERC’s mission to explore issues such as environmental hazards, natural resources, and environmental change. Instead, the names “Steve Prescott” (1,413) and “Poppy-Mai”/”Princess PoppyMai” (40,384 votes) received buzz; both individuals were struck down with rare forms of cancer. If NERC more clearly links their mission to staving off visible human or ecological tragedy, they might make good use of the awareness equity that their campaign has generated. 
  1. For others, the campaign was a pretended attempt of government to give citizens a voice when the final decision rests with privileged few. This is compounded by anxiety over the upcoming European Union membership referendum. NERC must navigate public sentiment in an environment where people are a bit on edge. This is expressly dangerous when a social media campaign is presented as crowdvoting. While crowdvoting or crowdsourcing can be a legitimate form of research, when public perception can’t differentiate a PR campaign masked as a public opinion poll from serious market research, it erodes researcher’s ability to get reliable market insights. 

For market research to work, we need the public to be smart—not silly. There is research value in capturing emotional response, but we need to strive to capture unbiased rational opinion. Social media marketing can taint the waters for research if the public perceives a campaign as being less than honest and truthful. 

The Australian Government is now pirating the #NameOurShip approach for their own new Antarctic scientific research vessel, vowing to avoid the ballast that seemingly sank public opinion of the UK’s campaign. I can’t wait to see what the Aussies come up with. 

Brian is a Senior Project Manager at Chadwick Martin Bailey. Given his Navy background, he feels compelled to point out that the vessel-who-must-be-named is not actually a “boat” and should be called “Shippy McShipface.” 

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Topics: consumer insights, social media, brand health and positioning

CMB Researcher in Residence: UPMC Health Plan's Jim Villella

Posted by Amy Modini

Tue, Apr 26, 2016

jim_upmc2.pngUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health Plan’s Director of Market Intelligence, Jim Villella, sat down with CMB’s Amy Modini to discuss the role of insights and market research at UPMC and the health insurance industry at large.

AM: Tell us a bit about your role as Director of Market Intelligence at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Health Plan.

JV: I oversee all external and internal intelligence within the health insurance industry in our market. Our Insurance Services Division (ISD) includes a lot more than just health insurance. Within the ISD, there are health insurance products as well as a suite of workplace productivity solutions under the WorkPartners brand.  WorkPartners offers worker’s compensation insurance, employee assistance programs, wellness programs, and some business productivity solutions, such as FMLA and short-term disability. Primary research is obviously one of the services that my team offers to all of UPMC ISD. This research is often an assessment of where we are compared to our competitors as well as opinions and attitudes of our current members. We also manage our marketing relational database, which is built at the consumer and employer level, so that we can do targeted marketing campaigns. Overall, it’s a pretty broad list of responsibilities.

AM: It certainly is! As we know, it’s been a disruptive few years for the healthcare industry. Looking ahead, what challenges and opportunities do you see coming?

JV: One of the biggest challenges for many health insurance companies who don’t have a large direct-to-consumer business sector is the end of the extension of the allowance for small groups under 50 to keep the plans they had prior to the implementation of the ACA. When the allowance goes away in 2017, those groups are going to have to move to community-rated insurance plans. Many of those groups will have to evaluate their situation when rates change in 2018, so that’s a challenge that insurers will face: transitioning what happens with those groups. The insurance companies will have to meet that challenge and ensure that they continue to insure those same people, whether it’s through a group or through the individual process. 

There are a lot of constraints on insurance companies with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). There are limitations on profitability and also on mitigating risk, so it’s a little bit harder to make a profit. And, as you can see in some markets, some of the more profit-driven public entities have chosen to take themselves out of the individual market in many areas because they’re finding it hard to have a viable business model in the current environment. There’s a lot of uncertainty in the market about who’s going to be there to provide the insurance solutions that are part of the ACA. 

AM: Do you think being part of an integrated system puts UPMC in a different position than other carriers that are just health insurance companies?

JV: Yes, I do. Because we’re an integrated delivery system, we have a lot more dialogue between the provider and the payer, which gives us more opportunities to intervene and identify solutions that will help people get better and stay healthy. Different payment models also emerge out of this position, which allows us to move away from a situation in which someone is paying providers for a service and move toward compensating them based on the effectiveness of the care. That’s much easier to do in an integrated system where we have direct relationships with a big portion of our provider-base. 

AM: What role do you believe healthcare insights, in particular, could play with some of the challenges and changes in the industry you mentioned?

JV: At the end of the day, much of what we deliver in the insurance business is somewhat commoditized. You have to offer things, in addition to paying claims and providing access to doctors and hospitals that members want, so that they remain with you when they have the opportunity to evaluate options in open enrollment periods. Research helps us immensely in identifying those unmet needs or identifying how well we can meet their needs that go beyond the basics of health insurance. 

Carriers have to move toward having one-on-one relationships between themselves and the individuals that they cover. In the past, carriers have had more of a relationship with a group that covers hundreds or thousands of people at a time, so the model is narrowing to an individual-level, much like auto insurance. You don’t really have employer-sponsored auto insurance. Every one of those carriers is dealing with each individual person one at a time, and that’s what the future of health insurance appears to be moving rapidly toward. The employer model is still the foundation for most U.S. health care, but if the health insurance exchanges continue to be successful and maintain competition and lower premiums—depending on who’s elected—it could continue to become more of an accepted way for Americans to obtain health insurance. 

AM: Let’s shift gears a little bit. Let’s talk about the market share analysis work we’ve done with you over the past couple of years. Can you talk a little bit about this work, and why it’s so important now?

JV: The rapid change in market share, year over year, is something we need to assess as quickly as possible, and the secondary sources we rely on to give us our definitive market share take several months to report. So, when we want to know in January what the market share shift has been, waiting for our secondary sources until July is simply too long. We partner with CMB so we can get a very quick, but accurate, assessment of how much the share has changed. The change in market share used to move at a glacial pace, but now it changes several percentage points for some carriers in a single year. We need to know about those changes as quickly as possible. We also use that study to assess perceptions and opinions of brands as well as what’s important to decision-makers, which helps us do some strategic planning for marketing purposes. 

AM: You’ve already touched on this a little bit, but how does this work play into your larger insights strategy?

JV: It helps us position ourselves and try to identify which areas of the geography we’re in that we could potentially focus on more. We get a more robust view of that at the county level from our secondary source in July. If we were to find opportunities or weaknesses in that share data—such as gaining or losing to a particular carrier in a particular region—we could react to that. It also helps us understand where the national competitors have gained traction—which ones are winning out and where. We need to be able to respond and understand who our competitors are as quickly as possible. 

AM: As you think about the next challenges for your organization, tell us what you look for in an insights partner.

JV: Several things:

  • Experience with our industry is helpful if not essential. Health insurance is a very complicated industry. I think it’s very difficult to partner with a research vendor that has no familiarity with the business. Even the terminology is difficult, so it would be hard to have to explain things about the industry over and over again.
  • A partner that does independent preparation and doesn’t rely exclusively on us to provide everything because they’ve done their homework.
  • Good problem-solving skills. Marketing and market research is basically just problem solving, and that manifests itself in even trying to design a research study. We need a partner that’s constantly asking: what’s the best way to do this?
  • Creative sample design. We sometimes have difficulty reaching certain audiences because we’re limited by our geographic footprint in western PA. So, finding a partner that can suggest alternatives for reliable ways of getting the same level of information is a huge component of what we need in a partner.
  • Visual interpretation of data is another one. That’s an art and a science, and partners who know how to show you information in a visual way are extremely helpful because that’s usually how it gets delivered to senior management, which is much easier to access than large, detailed crosstabs. 

These are all things we have working with you, and of course, we’ve had many years working together, so you know us very well and that familiarity is very helpful.

Got a market research question that you're just dying to have answered? Ask our Chief Methodologist and VP of Advanced Analytics, and he might tackle your question in his next blog!

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Topics: healthcare research, health insurance research, Researchers in Residence

Is Uber Living Its Brand Promise?

Posted by Tara Lasker

Thu, Apr 21, 2016

The Uber experience continues to fascinate me with each ride. I pepper my drivers with questions about Uber’s business model, their experience as a driver, and how satisfied they are driving for the sometimes controversial ride-share company. It’s a topic I also bring up around friends, family, and colleagues, and I always come back to the same question: where does Uber win and lose in the minds of end-customers?

I took a look at Uber’s brand promises to see if those promises aligned with my own experiences (as well as the experiences of other people I’ve talked to.) Below, you’ll find Uber’s promises to riders:

uber-2.png

  • Tap a button, get a ride. It’s so nice to be able to request a ride from Uber with one tap and have a clear expectation of when my driver will be there and what my ride will cost. I appreciate having my driver’s information as well as the license plate number on hand.

Verdict? Uber delivers in a big way on this promise. 

  • No cash, no tip, no hassle. Until recently, I thought this was true, and I loved Uber for it. I appreciated that everything was linked to my account and that I didn’t need to fumble around my wallet in a dark car at the end of my ride. I asked a driver about this a little while ago, and I was surprised to learn that not only are tips not included in the fare, but Uber has also begun taking a higher percentage from each ride. I researched this after I got home and saw that the driver was right: tips are not included. The more I researched, the more I realized that I was not the only one who had this misconception.

Verdict? Uber says there’s no need to tip, but it’s not explicitly stated that tips aren’t included in the ride cost at all. There’s a lot of confusion surrounding this issue. Since I now know that tips aren’t included, I plan on tipping my driver out of pocket, which reintroduces the problem of fumbling around in my wallet at the end of a ride. This is an issue that could make me to switch to a competitor (perhaps Lyft, which allows you to tip in the app). In my opinion, Uber owes its drivers (aka “partners”) and its customers clarification on why “there’s no need for a tip.” 

  • You rate, we listen. This might just be my personal misconception, but given that it seems that anyone can drive for Uber, safety is a concern. This steers me in the direction of cabs when I’m alone because I perceive them to be better regulated. However, if I’m with my husband or friends, I’m much more apt to take an Uber for the value. I have colleagues who consider Uber as (if not more safe) than a cab since all rides are tracked via GPS and riders have the driver’s picture and information as well as the vehicle’s information at their fingertips. Every week, it feels like there’s a new story about an assault on an Uber rider or driver, which can make taking an Uber feel like riding at your own risk. So, what about the rating? Does it help? Just like an eBay seller, do positive evaluations help communicate safety?

Verdict? I’m mixed. I’m still not convinced that Uber is any more or less safe than its alternatives. However, as a data nerd, I do appreciate having data on my driver when I request a ride.

Uber filled a much needed void when it launched in 2009. But as the company continues to grow, the promises it makes to customers don’t always ring true. The fix? Implementing a customer measurement system, which will ensure that the company delivers on these brand promises and doesn’t steer off the road of success. 

Tara is a Research Director at CMB. She enjoys nights out in the city with her husband and grilling her Uber driver on the way home.

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Topics: travel and hospitality research, brand health and positioning, customer experience and loyalty

What We’ve Got Here Is a Respondent Experience Problem

Posted by Jared Huizenga

Thu, Apr 14, 2016

respondent experience problemA couple weeks ago, I was traveling to Austin for CASRO’s Digital Research Conference, and I had an interesting conversation while boarding the plane. [Insert Road Trip joke here.]

Stranger: First time traveling to Austin?

Me: Yeah, I’m going to a market research conference.

Stranger: [blank stare]

Me: It’s a really good conference. I go every year.

Stranger: So, what does your company do?

Me: We gather information from people—usually by having them take an online survey, and—

Stranger: I took one of those. Never again.

Me: Yeah? It was that bad?

Stranger: It was [expletive] horrible. They said it would take ten minutes, and I quit after spending twice that long on it. I got nothing for my time. They basically lied to me.

Me: I’m sorry you had that experience. Not all surveys are like that, but I totally understand why you wouldn’t want to take another one.

Thank goodness the plane started boarding before he could say anything else. Double thank goodness that I wasn’t sitting next to him during the flight.

I’ve been a proud member of the market research industry since 1998. I feel like it’s often the Rodney Dangerfield of professional services, but I’ve always preached about how important the industry is. Unfortunately, I’m finding it harder and harder to convince the general population. The experience my fellow traveler had with his survey points to a major theme of this year’s CASRO Digital Research Conference. Either directly or indirectly, many of the presentations this year were about the respondent experience. It’s become increasingly clear to me that the market research industry has no choice other than to address the respondent experience “problem.”

There were also two related sub-themes—generational differences and living in a digital world—that go hand-in-hand with the respondent experience theme. Fewer people are taking questionnaires on their desktop computers. Recent data suggests that, depending on the specific study, 20-30% of respondents are taking questionnaires on their smartphones. Not surprisingly, this skews towards younger respondents. Also not surprisingly, the percentage of smartphone survey takers is increasing at a rapid pace. Within the next two years, I predict the percent of smartphone respondents will be 35-40%. As researchers, we have to consider the mobile respondent when designing questionnaires.

From a practical standpoint, what does all this mean for researchers like me who are focused on data collection?

  1. I made a bold—and somewhat unpopular—prediction a few years ago that the method of using a single “panel” for market research sample is dying a slow death and that these panels would eventually become obsolete. We may not be quite at that point yet, but we’re getting closer. In my experience, being able to use a single sample source today is very rare except for the simplest of populations.

Action: Understand your sample source options. Have candid conversations with your data collection partners and only work with ones that are 100% transparent. Learn how to smell BS from a mile away, and stay away from those people.

  1. As researchers, part of our job should be to understand how the world around us is changing. So, why do we turn a blind eye to the poor experiences our respondents are having? According to CASRO’s Code of Standards and Ethics, “research participants are the lifeblood of the research industry.” The people taking our questionnaires aren’t just “completes.” They’re people. They have jobs, spouses, children, and a million other things going on in their lives at any given time, so they often don’t have time for your 30-minute questionnaire with ten scrolling grid questions.

Action: Take the questionnaires yourself so you can fully understand what you’re asking your respondents to do. Then take that same questionnaire on a smartphone. It might be an eye opener.

  1. It’s important to educate colleagues, peers, and clients regarding the pitfalls of poor data collection methods. Not only does a poorly designed 30-minute survey frustrate respondents, it also leads to speeding, straight lining, and just not caring. Most importantly, it leads to bad data. It’s not the respondent’s fault—it’s ours. One company stood up at the conference and stated that it won’t take a client project if the survey is too long. But for every company that does this, there are many others that will take that project.

Action: Educate your clients about the potential consequences of poorly designed, lengthy questionnaires. Market research industry leaders as a whole need to do this for it have a large impact.

Change is a good thing, and there’s no need to panic. Most of you are probably aware of the issues I’ve outlined above. There are no big shocks here. But, being cognizant of a problem and acting to fix the problem are two entirely different things. I challenge everyone in the market research industry to take some action. In fact, you don’t have much of a choice.

Jared is CMB’s Field Services Director, and has been in market research industry for eighteen years. When he isn’t enjoying the exciting world of data collection, he can be found competing at barbecue contests as the pitmaster of the team Insane Swine BBQ.

Topics: data collection, mobile, research design, conference recap

Upcoming Webinar: Busting the Millennial Insurance Myth

Posted by Lori Vellucci

Thu, Apr 07, 2016

millennials and insuranceFree for 40 minutes next Wednesday? Join us for a webinar that will explore Millennial attitudes and behaviors toward insurance!

Insights will include:

  • A segmentation of Millennials revealing five distinct personas with varied brand preferences, attitudes, and behaviors
  • What Millennials expect and want from insurers and how to spur adoption
  • Key differences among younger (21-25) and older (26-30) Millennials
  • Profiles of high-value segments and how best to reach them
  • A comparison of generational expectations of mobile technology and applications
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 13th @ 12:30 EST
Speaker: Lori Vellucci, Account Director, Chadwick Martin Bailey
 
See you Wednesday!
Watch here!

Topics: insurance research, webinar

CMB Employee Spotlight: Andy Cole, Strategy Consultant

Posted by Heather Magaw

Wed, Mar 30, 2016

Andy_Cole_Chadwick Martin Bailey.jpgEarlier this year, CMB proudly introduced our new Consulting and Research Services team (CRS). This team is an extension of our long-term commitment to extending the reach of traditional market research through strategic consulting services. To better understand this team’s unique contributions to client engagements, I sat down one of our strategy consultants, Andy Cole. 

Andy, thanks for taking the time out of your day to connect. Can you tell me a little about your professional background and experiences? 

In a word, I would describe my career as “varied” or “diverse,” but most people look at my background and wonder if I have a problem sitting still. I’m originally trained as a mechanical engineer, and I started out doing R&D projects involving aerospace with Google, non-emissive fuels with the EPA, military-focused brain trauma with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), and vehicle collision forensics (with a small, lesser-known engineering company). My first regular job had me working for a large alternative energy company that would send me all over North America to climb 300-meter industrial wind turbines to figure out why they were offline, design temporary solutions to get them up and running ASAP, and work with R&D in Denmark to develop a permanent fix for systemic issues. 

I’m not sure if that meets anyone else’s definition of a regular job. So, how did you get from scaling wind turbines to a career in strategic consulting and research? 

I realized that I had a strong interest in business and management, so I got my MBA and began consulting with large, small, and non-profit organizations on a wide range of topics, including social media marketing, energy, executive training programs, and product development. I also launched two successful businesses in the innovation marketplace, helping large corporations rapidly develop new technologies and discover emerging markets, which was a great adventure but lacked the lifestyle I was ultimately looking for. 

I value diverse experiences because the most innovative solutions are borrowed from other industries and combined or repurposed in a new way. To me, this is the difference between being a true partner who can “connect the dots” versus a consultant who simply knows the best practices in a given industry. Clients don’t hire CMB if they’re just looking for best practices—we recommend a Google search for that purpose. 

Given your unique line of sight, in your opinion, what's the greatest opportunity facing businesses today that a research-based consulting engagement could support? 

There is an enormous trend in companies turning from sales-focused strategies to customer-centric design. When you hear companies embracing things like user experience, VOC, pivoting, and iterating, it’s all about observing and listening to customers, making constant measurements, testing new concepts in the market, etc. That all just screams for custom research. 

When companies are looking to become more customer-centric, they have to have a deep understanding of the target market that is backed by market information and unique insights. This is a huge opportunity for businesses to gain an advantage over their competition, and it’s truly CMB’s sweet spot. 

It seems that more and more consultants are embracing the impact of research. What’s your take on the role of research in the future of business consulting? 

The bottom line is that companies are looking for clear and confident strategic direction, and the language of today’s business is increasingly metric-oriented. It’s not enough for consultants to simply say that customers will like an idea or that a decision will result in greater revenues. The savvy business leader needs to know exactly how much more preferable a concept is and exactly how much revenue they should expect compared to taking an alternative path. Smart clients don’t trust advice without evidence to support it, and that is exactly what research provides. Good research forms the foundation on which effective strategies are built. 

Can you provide an example of a recent client engagement that blurred the lines of delineation between market research and strategic consulting? 

With the Affordable Care Act shaking up the entire healthcare industry, a large national insurance carrier saw an opportunity to use intimate knowledge of customer journey experiences and expectations to figure out which stages and channels were most influential (and would therefore pose the greatest marketing opportunity). Furthermore, the company wanted to know what messaging resonated with individual customers at each stage and within each channel, so it could be sure that marketing efforts would be as effective as possible.  

To tackle this ambiguous challenge, we took a multi-pronged and multi-phased approach: 

  1. A qualitative phase—involving in-depth interviews and moderated online discussion boards—to surface key stages, channels, and underlying context from the customer journey.
  2. A facilitated workshop with stakeholders and decision-makers to discuss key findings/insights and hypotheses, brainstorm potential solutions, and align on the path forward.
  3. A quantitative phase to reveal what individual customers value most throughout their experience and to identify which experiences have the potential to be particularly influential in the decision to purchase. 

It’s great when you get the opportunity to really dig in to that level of detail. What did you learn? 

At the conclusion of the project, we not only identified a number of surprising marketing opportunities by disproving a few fundamental assumptions, but we also validated (and put to rest) several long-standing hypotheses that were a stagnating source of internal debate. We also collaborated with the client to identify creative messaging campaigns that directly aligned with the trends stemming from our research as well as with the organization’s overarching strategic objectives. 

I look forward to hearing about more projects like this one that blur the lines in the future. Thanks again for taking time out of your day, Andy. 

Heather Magaw is the Vice President of Client Services at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has never climbed a wind turbine in her life. . .and never intends to.

Andy Cole is a Consultant at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has already left the interview to go investigate three seemingly unrelated things. 

Learn more about our strategy consulting expertise.

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, strategy consulting, healthcare research, business decisions, growth and innovation, customer journey