WELCOME TO OUR BLOG!

The posts here represent the opinions of CMB employees and guests—not necessarily the company as a whole. 

Subscribe to Email Updates

BROWSE BY TAG

see all

It’s Complicated: New Research on Emotion and Autonomous Vehicles

Posted by Chris Neal

Fri, Mar 22, 2019

Like many people, my relationship with technology is complicated, and when it comes to the increasing level of automation in cars, leading us—potentially—towards a future where many vehicles will be fully autonomous (i.e., no human drivers), it gets REALLY complicated. 

On one hand, the closest I’ve come to dying was in 1993 at the hands of a faulty after-market cruise control mechanism that terminally accelerated the vehicle I was driving (this is actually a thing, apparently). My sudden panic on the highway precluded a rational decision to put the car in neutral, turn the engine off altogether, and/or use the emergency brake. As we entered the highway off-ramp at 70 mph (brake on the floor) my girlfriend pulled an incredible Dukes-of-Hazzard style 90-degree spin turn that brought the car to heel, and ultimately, a miraculous stop.

I went on to marry that girl, of course.

While this happened back in 1993 (the car, the driver, and my very-questionable-90s hair pictured below)…

chris neal_AV… it gave birth to decades of irrational anxiety manifesting into all sorts of habits, including:

  • Never, ever, using cruise controls. Ever.
  • Avoiding elevators and escalators whenever possible (I’ve been mistaken for a Fitbit junkie on many occasions)
  • Seeking out manual transmission cars

Twenty-five years of significant technological advancements later, lots of people now share my emotional anxiety towards vehicular automation.

A new self-funded study we conducted indicates a rumbling emotional backlash towards autonomous vehicle (AV) technology. This is part of an ongoing proprietary analysis of the human emotional dimensions around disruptive emerging technologies, including virtual assistants and smart home technology.

In this study we leveraged our proprietary framework, EMPACT, and tested several AV-related scenarios to better understand consumers’ emotions towards the different use cases of this technology, including:

  • In a city: scenarios of (a) inside of an AV and (b) near an AV
  • On the highway: scenarios of (a) inside of an AV and (b) near an AV
  • Putting your child inside an AV alone
  • Putting an elderly relative inside an AV alone

The high-level results reveal a very steep path ahead for the AV industry in its journey to gaining widespread consumer acceptance.

As indicated in the chart below, a strong majority (~70%) of American adults reject all tested scenarios:

Likelihood to use Autonomous Cars

…and only 10% or so actively “accept” any of these scenarios.

Interestingly, the prospect of putting an elderly relative into an AV alone was even worse than the thought of one’s child riding solo.

 Understanding the emotional landscape behind these attitudes (i.e., how people feel about these scenarios) helps explain why.

Consumers react more negatively to autonomous vehicle-related scenarios than any other traditional or emerging category or brand we’ve tested to date. We’ve analyzed hundreds of brands across dozens of categories and have found, by far, AVs evoke the highest “net negative emotions”—a combination of valence (how bad) and activation (low to high energy).

Autonomous Vehicle Emotional Activation

If hopping in an AV yourself, the net negative emotional activation is -18%over 3x the net negative emotions generated from driving your own car. This came as a surprise considering plenty of our sample is from major urban areas where traffic continues its relentless march towards Sheer Awfulness. 

The prospect of having an autonomous vehicle, say, drive your kid to soccer practice on its own, fares even worse with a -27% net negative activation.

The verdict?

Although there are plenty of obvious benefits to autonomous vehicles, many people are still wary of this technology as it currently generates only ~12-16% net positive emotional activation compared to the ~42% generated by traditional driving.

And when compared to other emerging or disruptive technology categories like smart homes, autonomous vehicles also have a bigger emotional chasm to cross.

Smart Homes, for instance, do have a problem with not activating enough positive emotions (i.e., many people don’t “get” or feel the benefit of them), but at least they don’t have a major negative emotional barrier to overcome like AVs.

To learn more, join me on April 2nd at 2pm ET (11am PT). 

On April 2, I'll be hosting a brief webinar diving into the details of the specific negative and positive emotions that will be key to driving broader acceptance.

I’ll also cover an analysis of messaging that resonates with various consumer segments—uncovering what will compel/deter someone from considering this technology. 

Register Now

 Join me for the ride (sorry), I promise it will be interesting, useful and entertaining.

Chris Neal is CMB's VP of Tech and Telecom research who recently made strides towards his reconsideration of autonomous vehicles while on a road trip with his son.

Topics: Consumer Pulse, Artificial Intelligence

AI You Can Drive My Car: Anxiety and Autonomous Vehicles at CES

Posted by Megan McManaman

Wed, Jan 16, 2019

autonomous cars

In December, The New York Times reported that disgruntled Arizonans were lobbing rocks at Waymo’s autonomous (but not unoccupied) vans. Experts, and the rock-throwers themselves, blamed the attacks on a combination of economic anxiety and safety fears (a woman was struck and killed by a self-driving Uber in Tempe last March). While it’s unlikely any modern-day Luddites attended last week’s CES in Vegas, companies like Intel and Baidu, and even Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao were hard at work addressing consumer fears.

With Congress expected to consider legislation regulating autonomous vehicles—the intense conversation and debate over security and safety will remain front and center. Counting out the projectile-hurling robot-haters (for now), what’s it going to take for average consumers to purchase, ride in, and share the road with these vehicles? That’s the billion(s) dollar question we set out to answer in our self-funded Consumer Pulse.

We surveyed 2,000 U.S. consumers (thanks to Dynata for providing sample!), conducted ethnographies, and in-depth interviews—including ride-alongs—to identify the segments of the adult U.S. population that have different reactions to and perceptions of a range of assisted and autonomous driving scenarios. We went beyond the typical examination of functional benefits to understand the emotions (both positive and negative) driving and deterring greater acceptance and adoption.

Chris Neal, CMB’s VP of Tech and Telecom, will share the results at the Quirks Event on March 6 at 2:15 pm in Brooklyn.

Want an advance copy of the report this spring?

Click here

Megan McManaman is CMB's Marketing Director, she welcomes our new robot chauffers.

Topics: technology research, Consumer Pulse, Artificial Intelligence

Personalization, Privacy and the Creep Factor

Posted by Julia Walker

Wed, Jul 25, 2018

online shopping

You’ve seen it before: a pair of shoes that follow you all the way from Zappos.com to Facebook, or even creepier, when you have a conversation about Patagonia and suddenly, Instagram serves you an ad for their latest down jacket. Today’s marketers don’t have to guess where to place their ads anymore. Instead, they track online behavior to tailor ads, offers, products, and experiences to the specific consumer.

Leveraging online consumer behavioral data for personalization is now a standard marketing strategy, but what are the implications for brands and consumers?

Personalization drives consumer behavior. In fact, 80% of people are more likely to do business with a company if it offers them a personalized experience. Amazon revolutionized personalization when they rolled out their product recommendation algorithm—a feature some attribute to their huge sales increase (29% in the second fiscal quarter) in 2012. And it’s only advanced since then. With the help of AI and big data, brands can deliver highly custom experiences to consumers. Now, personalization spans devices, following you from your tablet to your desktop, and can recommend your next TV binge or anticipate an unmet need.

Personalization can also inspire loyalty, which means a greater customer lifetime value and possible advocacy. With forty-four percent of consumers saying they will likely make additional purchases after a personalized shopping experience, this is a tremendous opportunity for brands to break through the clutter with tailored messaging and offers.

But is there such thing as too much personalization? As brands continue to collect data to better understand and serve their customers, where does the line between service and invasion of privacy begin to blur? InMoment's 2018 CX Trends Report found that 75% of consumers find most forms of personalization at least somewhat “creepy”. And while half of consumers admitted they’d still shop with the brand after a creepy experience, almost a quarter reported it would drive them to a competitor.

The stakes are high for companies collecting customer data: 70% of consumers would stop doing business with a company that experienced a data breach. And this data is exactly what enables brands to personalize their offerings.

So, we’ll continue to see this tension play out across industries—while consumers continue to expect more personalization, brands must deliver tailored experiences without risking the creep factor.

Julia Walker is a Project Manager at CMB and an avid online shopper whose decisions are often influenced by algorithm recommendations.

Topics: retail research, Artificial Intelligence, ecommerce, data privacy

[New Webinar] Winning the Virtual Assistant War

Posted by Chris Neal

Tue, Jul 10, 2018

Have you ever asked Siri for the weather? Or maybe you've had Alexa look up a dinner recipe. Siri, Alexa, Google Assistant, and others have become household names as more people adopt virtual assistant technology. But most people are still only using their virtual assistants for basic search functions.

In this latest 20-minute webinar, I explore:

  • The barriers keeping people from using this tech
  • How emotional and identity benefits can drive mainstream consumer adoption and deeper engagement
  • What brands should do to drive adoption and win the VA war

Watch Now

While this webinar looks at the virtual assistant category, there are valuable learnings for anyone  experiencing disruption within their industry.

If you have any questions about the research, please reach out to to me directly at cneal@cmbinfo.com.

Chris Neal is CMB's VP of Tech and Telecom and has over 20 years of experience in the high tech, telecom, and media space.

Topics: technology research, webinar, Artificial Intelligence

How to Win Virtual Assistant Rejecters Over

Posted by Chris Neal

Wed, Jun 20, 2018

It seems like every week, tech giants are adding new features to their virtual assistant (VA) tech arsenal. See Google’s new Duplex technology—an AI system for accomplishing real-world tasks by phone. 

While companies are pouring millions into making their virtual assistants smarter and more integrated, most users don’t stray beyond its basic functions like asking for the weather.

Learn about the emotional and social identity dimensions keeping people from adopting and using this tech to its full potential, and what brands need to do to win the VA war.

CMB01_VA_Infographic_07_AW

Topics: technology research, Consumer Pulse, emotional measurement, AffinID, Artificial Intelligence