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Human Motivations Amid Disruption: 5G, COVID-19 & More

Posted by Chris Neal

Mon, Oct 26, 2020

Question: What do a global pandemic, 5G technologies, and puberty have in common?

Answer: Massive disruption as we know it.

Let’s start with the global pandemic. Like everyone, my household has had to adapt drastically in the face of a pandemic. In addition to stocking up on toilet-paper, our family’s digital dependence has sky-rocketed. It has exposed the limits of our internet access and Wi-Fi functionality, and frayed the fragile fabric of our family’s functionality. Our use of streaming video apps is much higher now, and it’s unlikely to go back to pre-pandemic levels long after the pandemic is gone. And we are not alone—in CMB’s COVID-19 tracking research, streaming video app usage across the US has also increased dramatically, and most people don’t expect it to return to pre-pandemic levels even after the virus is contained:

5G Blog COVID Data

Putting this problem into the Fogg model, we see our motivation to try something different/better for our internet access situation has increased dramatically. But, like most zip codes, broadband ISP competition is scarce. Better internet access is competing with toilet paper now in that upper left-hand quadrant of Foggville:

5G Blog Oct 2020 Fogg Model Internet Access-1

And this brings me to 5G technologies, the fifth generation technology standard for broadband cellular networks and the successor to 4G LTE.* This technology will increase the ability of many people to significantly improve their internet connectivity and potential, either as a fixed internet access substitute alternative, or for some households who may want to use 5G cellular connectivity as their only internet access (both inside and outside the home):

5G Blog Oct 2020 Fogg Model 5G-2

Oh, yeah: and puberty? My household is also navigating this pandemic with two teenagers, which is a miserable time of life to be stuck in the house with your parents pretty much 24/7. GenZ is the first generation to grow up not knowing life before pervasive mobile internet connections. One of their first waking memories was discovering the delights of a mobile fart app on the iPhone. And while I personally thought that was the pinnacle of potential for the mobile internet at the time, the industry has since risen to much greater heights. 5G is going to open a whole new world of application possibilities, and GenZ will be key in determining which of these take off. Video-enabled communications with friends (TikTok, FaceTime, Zoom, etc.), and online gaming will benefit most from 5G in the near-term. Usage has gone through the roof since the pandemic, and is unlikely to ever fully return to “normal”. The next wave may well be driven by Virtual Reality and/or Augmented Reality-enabled applications. Coincidentally, GenZ have the strongest interest in VR/AR gaming, and we know this generation is using online multi-player gaming for socialization more than ever during the pandemic.

UNDERSTANDING HUMAN MOTIVATION IN THE FACE OF CHANGING TECH ABILITIES

Any company trying to capitalize on the opportunities presented by a dramatically increased ability to deliver new and better 5G-enabled services to people can benefit by analyzing which specific human motivations are most important for any given new service, and how the pandemic may have altered these.

BrandFx Four Benefits Pillars

Let’s take basic broadband internet access in my household as an example:

  • FUNCTIONAL (what I want to do): our existing internet access is insufficient now that two teenagers are doing remote learning most days and two adults are teleworking: all four individuals are spending much more time on video streaming platforms, often simultaneously. This impacts the adults’ work productivity and the kids’ learning. Additionally, we are all streaming more digital entertainment (TV shows, movies, and online gaming for the kids) now that we don’t go out anymore. The Functional motivation is very clear.
  • SOCIAL (where I want to belong): Other people I know have switched to a 5G internet service. I’ve heard through online forums from people I don’t know about their experiences with 5G.
    • My kids rely on fast internet service with low latency for social connections. Problems with Facetime glitching or high ping/latency while playing Sea of Thieves with friends increases their (already high) sense of social isolation.
  • IDENTITY (who I want to be): I’d like to think I’m smart, leading edge, and open to change. I won’t keep to the status quo just because it’s familiar. And I solve practical problems around the household.
  • EMOTIONAL (how I want to feel): I am very frustrated and annoyed by my current internet service plan: the internet quality and reliability doesn’t meet my family’s current needs during this pandemic, I don’t feel like I’m getting value for the price I am currently paying, and I don’t feel respected when I call customer service.
    • I feel anxious, however, that switching to 5G may compromise the security of my internet access. And I am concerned that it may be unreliable (e.g., glitchy when there is severe weather, because I’ve heard about this with satellite TV connections).

Across many industries and products, we have found that the emotional, identity, and/or social motivations are just as—and often more—important determinants of a new product’s success than the functional ones. And the interactions across different types of motivations can be highly prescriptive for laying successful go-to-market plans in the face of extreme uncertainty.

We are neither soothsayers nor oracles, but we do know how to leverage the power of psychology to help navigate a future that promises to be full of change and more disruption.

*No, this is not another conspiracy blog about how 5G technologies caused the Covid-19 outbreak. They did not.


Christopher NealChris Neal, VP of CMB's Tech & Telecom Practice, has over 20 years of experience in high tech, online, consumer electronics, telecom and media insights, analytics, and consulting.

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Topics: technology research, strategy consulting, technology solutions, mobile, business decisions, consumer insights, millennials, internet of things, marketing strategy, Consumer Pulse, emotional measurement, brand health and positioning, customer experience and loyalty, growth and innovation, Market research, emotion, Artificial Intelligence, BrandFx, consumer psychology, technology, Gaming, Gen Z, AR/VR, collaborative intelligence, COVID-19, consumer sentiment, Next-Gen Gaming, customer centricity, AI, Habit Loops

Swipe Right for Insights

Posted by Jared Huizenga

Wed, Aug 17, 2016

Data collection geeks like me can learn a ton at the CASRO Digital Research Conference. While the name of the event has changed many times over the years, the quality of the presentations and the opportunity to learn from experts in the industry are consistently good.

One topic that came up many years ago was conducting surveys via cellphones with SMS texts. This was at a time when most people had cellphones, but it was still a couple of years before the smartphone explosion. I remember listening to one presentation and looking down at my Samsung flip-phone thinking, “There’s no way respondents will take a CMB questionnaire this way.” For a few simple yes/no questions, this seemed like a fine methodology but it certainly wouldn’t fly for any of CMB’s studies.

For the next two or three years, less than half of the U.S. population owned smartphones (including yours truly). Even so, SMS texting was getting increasing coverage at the CASRO conference, and I was having a really hard time understanding why. Every year was billed as “the year of mobile!” I could see the potential of taking a survey while mobile, but the technology and user experience weren’t there yet. Then something happened that changed not only the market research industry but the way in which we live as human beings—smartphone adoption skyrocketed.
Girl_and_phone.jpg

Today in the U.S., smartphone ownership among adults is 72% according to the Pew Research Center. People are spending more time on their phones and less time sitting in front of a computer. Depending on the study and the population, anywhere from 20%-40% of survey takers are using their smartphones. And if it’s a study with people under 25 years old, that number would likely be even higher. We can approach mobile respondents in three ways:

  • Do nothing. This means surveys will be extremely cumbersome to take on smartphones, to the point where many will abandon during the painful process. This really isn’t an option at all. By doing nothing, you’re turning your back on the respondent experience and basically giving mobile users the middle finger.
  • Optimize questionnaires for mobile. All of CMB’s questionnaires are optimized for mobile. That is, our programming platforms identify the device type a respondent is using and renders the questionnaire to the appropriate screen size.  Even with this capability, long vertical grids and wide horizontal scales will still be painful for smartphone users since they will require some degree of scrolling. This option is better than nothing, but long questions are still going to be long questions.
  • Design questionnaires for mobile. This is the best option, and one that isn’t used often enough. This requires questions and answer options to be written with the idea that they will be viewed on smartphones. In other words, no lengthy grids, no sprawling scales, no drag and drop, minimal scrolling, or anything else that would cause the mobile user angst.  While this option sounds great, one of the criticisms has been that it’s difficult to do advanced exercises like max-diff or discrete choice on smartphones.

One cautionary note if you are thinking that a good option would be to simply disallow respondents from taking a survey on their smartphones.  Did your parents ever tell you not to do something when you were a child?  Did you listen to them or did you try it anyway? What’s going to happen when you tell someone not to take a survey on their mobile device?  Either by mistake or out of sheer defiance, some people will attempt to take it on their smartphone. This happened on a recent study for one of our clients.  These people tried to “stick it to the man,” but alas they were denied entry into the survey. If you want “representative” sample, the other argument against blocking mobile users is that you are blocking specific populations which could skew the results.

The respondent pool is getting shallow, and market research companies are facing increased challenges when it comes to getting enough “completes” for their studies.  It’s important for all of us to remember that behind every “complete” is a human being—one who’s trying to drag and drop a little image into the right bucket or one who’s scrolling and squinting to make sure they are choosing the right option on an 11-point scale in a twenty row grid.  Unless everyone is comfortable basing their quantitative findings off of N=50 in the future, we all need to take steps to embrace the mobile respondent. 

Jared is CMB’s Field Services Director, and has been in market research industry for eighteen years. When he isn’t enjoying the exciting world of data collection, he can be found competing at barbecue contests as the pitmaster of the team Insane Swine BBQ.

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Topics: mobile, research design, Market research

Passive Mobile Behavioral Data – Part Deux

Posted by Chris Neal

Wed, Aug 10, 2016

Over the past two years, we've  embarked on a quest to help the insights industry get better at harnessing passive mobile behavioral data. In 2015, we partnered with Research Now for an analysis37824990_thumbnail.jpg of mobile wallet usage, using unlinked passive and survey-based data. This year, we teamed up with Research Now once again for research-on-research directly linking actual mobile traffic and app data to consumers’ self-reported online shopper journey behavior.

We asked over 1,000 shoppers, across a variety of Black Friday/Cyber Monday categories, a standard set of purchase journey survey questions immediately after the event, then again after 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days. We then compared their self-reported online and mobile behavior to the actual mobile app and website usage data from their smartphones. 

The results deepened our understanding of how best to use (and not use) each respective data source, and how combining both can help our clients get closer to the truth than they could using any single source of information.

Here are a few things to consider if you find yourself tasked with a purchase journey project that uses one or both of these data sources as fuel for insights and recommendations:

  1. Most people use multiple devices for a major purchase journey, and here’s why you should care:
    • Any device tracking platform (even one claiming a 3600 view) is likely missing some relevant online behavior to a given shopper journey. In our study, we were getting behavior from their primary smartphone, but many of these consumers reported visiting websites we had no record of from our tracking data. Although they reported visiting these websites on their smartphones, it is likely that some of these visits happened on their personal computer, a tablet, a computer at their work, etc.
  2. Not all mobile usage is related to the purchase journey you care about:
    • We saw cases of consumers whose behavioral data showed they’d visited big retail websites and mobile apps during the purchase journey but who did not report using these sites/apps as part of the journey we asked them about. This is a bigger problem with larger, more generalist mobile websites and apps (like Amazon, for this particular project, or like PayPal when we did the earlier Mobile Wallet study with a similar methodological exercise).
  3. Human recall ain’t perfect. We all know this, but it’s important to understand when and where it’s less perfect, and where it’s actually sufficient for our purposes. Using survey sampling to analyze behaviors can be enormously valuable in a lot of different situations, but understand the limitations and when you are expecting too much detail from somebody to give you accurate data to work with.  Here are a few situations to consider:
    • Asking whether a given retailer, brand, or major web property figured into the purchase journey at all will give you pretty good survey data to work with. Smaller retailers, websites, and apps will get more misses/lack of recall, but accurate recall is a proxy for influence, and if you’re ultimately trying to figure out how best to influence a consumer’s purchase journey, self-reported recall of visits is a good proxy, whereas relying on behavioral data alone may inflate the apparent impact of smaller properties on the final purchase journey.
    • Asking people to remember whether they used the mobile app vs. the mobile website introduces more error in your data. Most websites are now mobile optimized and look/ feel like mobile apps, or will switch users to the native mobile app on their phone automatically if possible.
      • In this particular project, we saw evidence of a 35-50% improvement in survey-behavior match rates if we did not require respondents to differentiate the mobile website from the mobile app for the same retailer.
  4. Does time-lapse matter? It depends.
    • For certain activities (e.g., making minor purchases in grocery store, a TV viewing occasion), capturing in-the-moment feedback from consumers is critical for accuracy.
    • In other situations where the process is bigger, involves more research, or is more memorable in general (e.g., buying a car, having a wedding, or making a planned-for purchase based on a Black Friday or Cyber Monday deal): you can get away with asking people about it further out from the actual event.
      • In this particular project, we actually found no systematic evidence of recall deterioration when we ran the survey immediately after Black Friday/Cyber Monday vs. running it 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days after.

Working with passive mobile behavioral data (or any digital passive data) is challenging, no doubt.  Trying to make hay by combining these data with primary research survey sampling, customer databases, transactional data, etc., can be even more challenging.  But, like it or not, that’s where Insights is headed. We’ll continue to push the envelope in terms of best practices for navigating these types of engagements as Analytics teams, Insights departments, Financial Planning and Strategy groups work together more seamlessly to provide senior executives with a “single version of the truth”— one which is more accurate than any previously siloed version.

Chris Neal leads CMB’s Tech Practice. He knows full well that data scientists and programmatic ad buying bots are analyzing his every click on every computing device and is perfectly OK with that as long as they serve up relevant ads. Nothing to hide!

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Topics: advanced analytics, mobile, passive data, integrated data

Can Facial Recognition Revolutionize Qualitative?

Posted by Will Buxton

Wed, Aug 03, 2016

Full disclosure: I’m an Android and Google loyalist, but please don’t hold that against me or the rest of my fellow Android users, who, by the way, comprise 58% of the smartphone market share in the United States. As a result of my loyalty, I’m always intrigued by Google’s new hardware and software advancements, which are always positioned in a way that leads me to believe they will make my life easier. Some of the innovations over the years have in fact lived up to the hype, such as Google Now, Google Drive, and even Google Fusion, while others such as Google Buzz and Google Wave have not.

As a researcher, last year’s launch of Google Photos caught my eye. Essentially, Google
Photos now utilizes facial recognition software to group or bunch your photos based on people in them, scenery (i.e., beaches and Google_Photos_icon.svg-1.pngmountains) and even events (i.e., weddings and holidays). To activate the facial recognition feature, all you have to do is tag one photo with an individual’s name and all other photos with that person will be compiled into a searchable collection. Google uses visual cues within the photos and geotagging to create other searchable collections. While these features might not seem extraordinary—I can see who was the most frequent star of my photos (my enormous cat) or where I most commonly take photos (honeymoon sans enormous cat)—I began to imagine the possible impact these features could have on the market research industry.

Visual ethnographies are one of many qualitative research options we offer at CMB. This is a rich form of observation, and, for some companies, it can be cost prohibitive in nature, especially ones focused on a “cost-per-complete.” But, what if there was a way to remove some of the heavy lifting of a customer journey ethnography by quantifying some of the shopping experience using technology that could track date/time, location, shopping layout, products viewed, order in which products are viewed, and so on, all through recognition software? Would the reduction in hours, travel, and analysis be able to offset the technological costs of these improvements?

Market research, and, in particular, qualitative research have always been a combination of art and science, and to expect any technological advancement to adequately perform any cogent analyses is a bit premature and perhaps too reminiscent of The Minority Report. (I don’t think it worked out well). But the promise of these powerful tools makes it an exciting time to  be a qualitative researcher!

Will Buxton is a Project Manager on the Financial Services team. He enjoys finding humor in everyday tasks, being taken seriously, and his enormous cat.

Learn more about how our dedicated Qualitative practice helps brands Explore, Listen, & Engage.

 

 

 

Topics: methodology, qualitative research, mobile, storytelling, customer journey

What We’ve Got Here Is a Respondent Experience Problem

Posted by Jared Huizenga

Thu, Apr 14, 2016

respondent experience problemA couple weeks ago, I was traveling to Austin for CASRO’s Digital Research Conference, and I had an interesting conversation while boarding the plane. [Insert Road Trip joke here.]

Stranger: First time traveling to Austin?

Me: Yeah, I’m going to a market research conference.

Stranger: [blank stare]

Me: It’s a really good conference. I go every year.

Stranger: So, what does your company do?

Me: We gather information from people—usually by having them take an online survey, and—

Stranger: I took one of those. Never again.

Me: Yeah? It was that bad?

Stranger: It was [expletive] horrible. They said it would take ten minutes, and I quit after spending twice that long on it. I got nothing for my time. They basically lied to me.

Me: I’m sorry you had that experience. Not all surveys are like that, but I totally understand why you wouldn’t want to take another one.

Thank goodness the plane started boarding before he could say anything else. Double thank goodness that I wasn’t sitting next to him during the flight.

I’ve been a proud member of the market research industry since 1998. I feel like it’s often the Rodney Dangerfield of professional services, but I’ve always preached about how important the industry is. Unfortunately, I’m finding it harder and harder to convince the general population. The experience my fellow traveler had with his survey points to a major theme of this year’s CASRO Digital Research Conference. Either directly or indirectly, many of the presentations this year were about the respondent experience. It’s become increasingly clear to me that the market research industry has no choice other than to address the respondent experience “problem.”

There were also two related sub-themes—generational differences and living in a digital world—that go hand-in-hand with the respondent experience theme. Fewer people are taking questionnaires on their desktop computers. Recent data suggests that, depending on the specific study, 20-30% of respondents are taking questionnaires on their smartphones. Not surprisingly, this skews towards younger respondents. Also not surprisingly, the percentage of smartphone survey takers is increasing at a rapid pace. Within the next two years, I predict the percent of smartphone respondents will be 35-40%. As researchers, we have to consider the mobile respondent when designing questionnaires.

From a practical standpoint, what does all this mean for researchers like me who are focused on data collection?

  1. I made a bold—and somewhat unpopular—prediction a few years ago that the method of using a single “panel” for market research sample is dying a slow death and that these panels would eventually become obsolete. We may not be quite at that point yet, but we’re getting closer. In my experience, being able to use a single sample source today is very rare except for the simplest of populations.

Action: Understand your sample source options. Have candid conversations with your data collection partners and only work with ones that are 100% transparent. Learn how to smell BS from a mile away, and stay away from those people.

  1. As researchers, part of our job should be to understand how the world around us is changing. So, why do we turn a blind eye to the poor experiences our respondents are having? According to CASRO’s Code of Standards and Ethics, “research participants are the lifeblood of the research industry.” The people taking our questionnaires aren’t just “completes.” They’re people. They have jobs, spouses, children, and a million other things going on in their lives at any given time, so they often don’t have time for your 30-minute questionnaire with ten scrolling grid questions.

Action: Take the questionnaires yourself so you can fully understand what you’re asking your respondents to do. Then take that same questionnaire on a smartphone. It might be an eye opener.

  1. It’s important to educate colleagues, peers, and clients regarding the pitfalls of poor data collection methods. Not only does a poorly designed 30-minute survey frustrate respondents, it also leads to speeding, straight lining, and just not caring. Most importantly, it leads to bad data. It’s not the respondent’s fault—it’s ours. One company stood up at the conference and stated that it won’t take a client project if the survey is too long. But for every company that does this, there are many others that will take that project.

Action: Educate your clients about the potential consequences of poorly designed, lengthy questionnaires. Market research industry leaders as a whole need to do this for it have a large impact.

Change is a good thing, and there’s no need to panic. Most of you are probably aware of the issues I’ve outlined above. There are no big shocks here. But, being cognizant of a problem and acting to fix the problem are two entirely different things. I challenge everyone in the market research industry to take some action. In fact, you don’t have much of a choice.

Jared is CMB’s Field Services Director, and has been in market research industry for eighteen years. When he isn’t enjoying the exciting world of data collection, he can be found competing at barbecue contests as the pitmaster of the team Insane Swine BBQ.

Topics: data collection, mobile, research design, conference recap