WELCOME TO OUR BLOG!

The posts here represent the opinions of CMB employees and guests—not necessarily the company as a whole. 

Subscribe to Email Updates

BROWSE BY TAG

see all

IA CRC - Be The Change

Posted by Julie Kurd

Fri, Oct 25, 2019

Maybe a lack of curiosity CAN kill the consumer insights professional. Speakers at the Insights Association’s Corporate Researcher’s Conference choraled symphony of voices around the concepts of exploration, trust, and curiosity. With the click of a button, Microsoft’s Anne Sedgwick and Anil Damodarans’ voices were transcribed into real-time closed captions as they shared how humans and AI make “a great orchestra.”

Here are some other key takeaways from the conference:

  • Unpacking Curiosity, by Alison Horstmeyer:  We live in a VUCA world (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous), began Alison Horstmeyer in her “Unpacking Curiosity” presentation. Alison asked each of us to pick a photo and answer key questions. My picture was a bike leaning on a tree on a beautiful autumn day. She asked what happened the minute before this picture was taken. She asked what will happen in the next minute. She asked what the most significant thing in the photo is and what the key emotions are. Throughout the session, she motivated exploratory behavior in us, asking us to be resilient, curious, and open. Thanks to her exercise, I could see more opportunities to cultivate openness and ideational fluency, through continuing to venture out of our boxes through: 1) active exploration, 2) engaged inquisitiveness, 3) openness to experience and 4) stress tolerance. She described the value of P.R.O.B.E. or Presence (open ended, listening), Reframe (‘how might we…’), Openness (“tell me more”), Bravery (resilience), Experimentation (attempts in learning).
    CRC blog quote #2 oct 2019
  • Google: “Puppy or Not a Puppy,” by Elizabeth Merrick May: In a world where the market research industry typically statistically tests at a 90% confidence, Elizabeth challenges us with a simple question: puppy or not a puppy? Using this example to describe algorithm training in machine learning, she talked about how in a world of disruptors and disruption, we need to always think about the payoff. Don’t let the world mire you in decisions with minimal downside. Incrementality requires one set of decisions. Leaps require new models. Which is worse to be wrong about: deciding in favor of something that is actually bad or deciding against something that’s actually good?  We can underfit our models (too simplistic to really explain the variance), overfit (add too many options into the possibility so we don’t risk excluding…this makes it hard to replicate). She said a typing tool with the least number of questions yielding the most ‘accurate enough’ output is the one to go with. She challenged us to not over-define things…after all, there’s a downside to being thorough. She encouraged us not to pursue ‘right’ but instead to pursue the ‘right’ amount of ‘wrong’ by setting a risk-based approach. Although pup could be a dog or a seal, ultimately, we are looking for the right amount of wrong.Twitter Mattel blog quote oct 2019 (4)
  • Taboo Discussions and Peer-to-Peer Self-Moderation, by Melissa Spencer, Merck and Kim Bowers, Brado: Want to know about emotional and functional barriers to diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s? STDs? Topics that Merck and Brado were noodling on included the elephant in the room…was it possible that the qualitative moderator impeded their authenticity by their very physical presence? Could they possibly launch self-moderated, consumer-to-consumer (C2C) discussions? They tried it. And they spoke about how C2C is messy, but the potential payoff exceeded the risks, so they recruited consumers, and, for Alzheimer’s, they asked that person to recruit a few friends for the ‘friend’ groups. They asked these groups to hold ‘book club’ style sessions in their homes, and to videotape it. For the STD discussion, they found that C2C ‘stranger’ sessions—recruited on a guide, and then brought to a facility—worked best.
  • Influence In the Age of ML, by Eric Solomon: Can you embrace curiosity, and the need to experiment? Eric shared the magic that can happen at the intersection of emergent technologies such as Artificial Intelligence and human psychology. If you believe that superintelligence is possible, that intersection shifts the way we tell and consume stories. Eric showed us advertisements that were created by AI, such as this ad by McCann for Clorets gum; And, on watching, tweeting and other behavior, I must have shifted Google’s algorithms, because I got served up the coolest, craziest ad. Does emergent technology disrupt? That girl be a tomboy.

PostScript:  Jeffrey Henning presented the new Insights Professional Certification program which will launch in 2020. The IPC, is an upcoming @InsightsMRX program, backed by @BurkeInstitute, @CambiarConsults, @ResearchRocks, @Rivainc and the @MRII_UGA and includes 5 new topic certifications (IPC Analytics, Practitioner, Qualitative, Quantitative and Specialist). Click here to learn more.


Julie KurdJulie Kurd is the VP, Business Development at CMB.

For more insights, please follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Topics: conference recap, growth and innovation, Market research, Artificial Intelligence, professional development

Will Technology Kill the Research Star?

Posted by Megan McManaman

Wed, Sep 18, 2019

Notes from WIRe’s New Directions in Market Research

WIRe Speakers and Moderator (pictured left to right): Jackie Anderson, Blair Bailey, Bridget Nelson, Beatrice Capestany, and Karampreet Sandu.

CMB was thrilled to host and co-sponsor WIRe’s (Women in Research) lively panel this week: New Directions in Market Research. The panelists—CMB’s Blair Bailey, Shark Ninja’s Bridget Nelson, Reputation Institute’s Karampreet Sandhu, and quantilope’s Beatrice Capestany—provided a lot of insight on the challenges and opportunities facing the insights industry. Through their perspectives, we explored how tech is changing the world of insights and the role of the researcher—a topic that’s been the subject of thousands of tweets, thought pieces, industry reports, and an unquantifiable amount of hand-wringing.

Technology Take Over: Friend or Foe?

We’re happy to report there was little hand-wringing about the death of the researcher and much excitement for the future of insights and market research. Our diverse panel agreed technology won’t obviate the insights role—but it is irrevocably changing it by forcing many researchers to re-evaluate where we can add true value to our clients.

Platforms to Consider

The discussion was as wide-ranging as you’d imagine with a topic as broad and nebulous as “technology in market research.” The panelists sang the praises of Slack to facilitate agile solution development and communication, various automation platforms such as Alteryx and quantilope, and the exciting advancements that Virtual Reality may offer to create powerful participant experiences and insight.

Looking Ahead

Ultimately, the question is not, will the insights role survive into the 21st Century, it is who will leverage the right tools while channeling the data fluency creativity, context, and storytelling acumen that bring meet our clients’ challenges?


Megan McManamanMegan McManaman, Marketing Director, is one of CMB's strategists and insight-miners with a passion for storytelling.

For more insights, please follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Topics: consumer insights, professional development, technology

Lobster Served with a Side of Gratitude to CMB Employees

Posted by Savannah House

Wed, Aug 08, 2018

Last Friday we took a break to celebrate our team’s hard work at the annual CMB Summer Party. It was a hot and humid day—even for New England’s standards—but that didn’t stop us from coming out to celebrate the summer season with a good old fashioned New England clambake.

The Summer Party is one of our favorite days of the year because it brings Boston-based and remote CMBers together for a fun day of good food, conversation, and relaxation. Nothing says team bonding like matching lobster bibs! 

CMB Summer Party 2018 (1)

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Call it cliché, but at CMB, it’s true. CMBers are the company’s most valuable resources, and whether it’s at the Summer Party, one of the many CMB Social Committee-sponsored events, or our internal CMBU training program, we continually strive to recognize employees’ hard work, foster creativity, provide flexibility, and encourage professional growth.

CMB Summer Party 2018 (6)

Interested in joining the CMB team? We’re always looking for smart, curious, and experienced market research professionals. Check out our latest openings below:

Open Roles

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, CMB Careers, professional development

Optimizing Your Conference ROI

Posted by Julie Kurd

Thu, Aug 02, 2018

attending a conference (Resized)

With tightening travel and professional development budgets, I've adapted an earlier blog post about making the most of your conference experience. Conferences are expensive and so your company wants to know what’s in it for them.

And while of course you need to prove the ROI, you also need to think about it as "WIIFM" ("What’s in it for me”) to squeeze every valuable ounce out of your conference experience and delight your company.

With the US insights community’s largest industry conferences (TMRE and CRC) right around the corner, let’s talk personal branding and ROI:

  • Block off your office calendar during the days of the conference. Activate your out of office message and be sure to mention that you’re WORKING offsite all day.  It is really a crime against your boss and company to be dialing into staff meetings or writing emails from your hotel room when you mutually agreed that you’d be learning at a conference. The conference ROI of you missing the conference because you were sitting in your hotel room…it’s not pretty.  Thank your boss/peers/staff for this critical professional development opportunity as appropriate and promise the right person at your company a brief ROI summary (more later).
  • Highlight the agenda prior to the conference. Map out which sessions you want to attend. When there are several tracks running concurrently, I circle my agenda with all the sessions I want to see and then go back and refine when I’m actually at the conference. Sometimes the same (or similar) session is held at two different times during a conference so you don’t have to make tough tradeoffs. Or sometimes the keynote has a working session and after their opening presentation, so you could hear them twice or try something new.
  • Plan your elevator pitch and ask: Whether you’re reserved or chatty, you’re going meet a lot of new people at conferences, so make sure to prepare your elevator pitch:
    1. “My name is ___ and I work for ___, the makers of ___. In the coming year we’re focused on improving our ___, and for that reason, I’m here at the conference to learn more about ___.” 
    2. Here’s an example: “We just finished up a big customer journey project, which will help us drive the right messages to the right people at the right moments.” You can follow up with something like: “In the coming year we’re going to do a lot of messaging optimization and concept testing to bring those moments into focus by segment.” That’s your hook, and your reason for the conversation you’re having.   
    3. Next comes your question. You’ve offered a bit about what you do, but who are you talking to?  If they are a peer or competitor, ask, “How about you?”  That’s it.  You need to bring this information back to your company.  If they are a supplier of research, ask, “How would you approach this if you were pitching to me?” 
  • Recap at least three sessions in writing so you can talk specifically about the cases during a future lunch and/or meeting:  Don’t just return to the office and proclaim, “the conference was great; I learned so much.” Listen fiercely and write down who spoke, what they said, how they presented. Take something forward that you can apply in your own career. Why was that session useful?  Did the speaker talk about a new technique? Did they present in a style that you want to mimic? Did they talk about the world of tomorrow in a way that’s accessible to you, can you bring it to life back at your company? Once you finish writing and are back home, how can you mention that session 3x, so it sticks in your active memory and changes something about your habits? 
  • Make a few new acquaintances (and connect on LinkedIn):  You want to keep actively learning and building your professional network, so connect on LinkedIn with speakers and conference goers. One of our F100 clients recently told me, “I’m painfully introverted so I just go to the sessions.” And while of course I understand, it’s vital to us all to expand our network, from a peer, collaborator, and employee recruitment perspective. Let’s always be learning together.
  • Bonus tip—take a photo of yourself with one of the famous speakers and share it with your CMO: OK, you don’t NEED to do this, but you need to come up with one visual representation of you broadening your horizons at the conference. If you’re speaking, get a photo of you while presenting (any of us will take it… just ask).  If you’re attending, snap a picture of your favorite speakers or in “Booth City” where you’ll meet a number of suppliers.  Share your photo with your company so they can experience your effort (and visualize you learning vs. at the pool). If relevant to you, even consider sharing it on LinkedIn or Twitter because a picture tells a great story (and gets a lot of likes!)

Are you heading to CRC or TMRE? If so, reach out and let’s connect while there!

Julie is an inspired TMRE Sponsor, participant, amplifier, socializer, and spotter, interested in your stories; follow her on LinkedIn.

Topics: conference recap, professional development