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Heather Magaw

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Employee Appreciation: The Importance of Providing Emotional Benefits

Posted by Heather Magaw

Wed, Feb 28, 2018

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An organization’s people are its most valuable assets.

And in today’s job competitive market, companies finding and retaining top talent need to go beyond “benefits” like ping-pong tables and yoga classes. These tangible perks look great, but on their own they won’t foster employee loyalty and motivate productivity.

A key to a corporate culture that inspires and motivates employees is ongoing appreciation—showing gratitude each and every day. Providing emotional benefits (e.g., feeling appreciated and valued) is one of the most important things a company can do for its employees—in addition to providing functional benefits (e.g., free lunches).

But identifying what employees truly value and what makes them feel appreciated can be challenging. It requires a thoughtful approach to understanding human behavior and acknowledging our intrinsic desire to be recognized, celebrated, and appreciated every day.

At CMB, we found that our employees feel more appreciated by intangible, personal gestures like:

  • Receiving an email of appreciation from a client
  • Finding a “thank you” post-it from a colleague stuck to the desk
  • Getting a handwritten thank you note in your company mailbox
  • Seeing an email of acknowledgement to a manager about an employee’s unique contribution

These small acts of kindness and appreciation can speak louder than a free lunch or Summer Fridays. They are thoughtful, meaningful, and make employees truly feel valued for the work they do.

Springing for a midafternoon ice cream party is a lot easier than encouraging busy colleagues to take the time to write personal notes. But, I challenge leadership teams to foster workplace environments that practice ongoing appreciation. As Stephen R. Covey once said, “Always treat your employees exactly as you want them to treat your best customers.”

In an upcoming webinar, join Erica Carranza, PhD., and learn how building meaningful connections promotes workplace satisfaction and productivity.

Register Now

Heather Magaw is VP, Client Services at CMB. She challenges each reader to write 5 emails or notes of appreciation on Friday, March 2, Employee Appreciation Day.

 

Topics: our people, emotional measurement, emotion

Using Emotion to Drive Brand Loyalty

Posted by Heather Magaw

Mon, Feb 13, 2017

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Stores have been stocked with heart-shaped candies and cards since December, but now that it’s actually February, I think it’s okay to think about Valentine’s Day.  And because love is in the air (as well as on the shelves) it’s a perfect time to think about how brands can tap into this fundamental human experience to drive consideration, usage and loyalty.  

We already know that understanding and influencing consumers’ emotions is crucial for building a loyal customer base, but what do we really know about love that could help us achieve those lofty outcomes? Based on a quick Google search (and a few life experiences), here’s what I’ve learned so far:

Love is an emotion.

Love is an action.

Love is a biological motivation system.

Love is an attitude.

Love is a drive.

Love is a choice.

Love is patient.

Love is blind.

Love is a battlefield.

Love, as it turns out, is rather complex. So what does that mean for marketers trying to get people to fall in love with their brands? Where do you start?  

When studying emotion, traditionally researchers take a brand-centric approach and focus on how consumers feel about the brand. While there’s valuable insight there, it’s often more valuable to take a consumer-centric approach, one that asks consumers how the brand makes them feel. Consumers develop feelings about a brand because of how it makes them feel… understanding those feelings evoked by the brand is critical insight into how consumers develop strong, positive sentiments towards the brand.

That’s why EMPACTSM, our proprietary approach to measuring emotion, is based on decades of consumer psychology research, helping marketers understand how a brand or touchpoint should make consumers feel to most effectively drive their behaviors, and ultimately brand love.

For marketers trying to earn consumers’ love this Valentine’s Day (and the other 364 days of the year), it’s critical to explore which emotions your brand should evoke to make them love your brand. Do they want to feel respected? Proud? Efficient? Secure? Surprised?  Just like with the object of your romantic affections, you’ll be far more successful with your customers if you ask them how they want to feel and create experiences and messaging that inspire those emotions. [twitter.png Tweet this!]  

Heather Magaw is VP of Client Services at CMB. The brands she loves most this Valentine’s season are Apple, Amazon, Red Sox, IBM Watson, and CMB (of course!).  

Topics: EMPACT, emotional measurement, emotion

CMB Employee Spotlight: Andy Cole, Strategy Consultant

Posted by Heather Magaw

Wed, Mar 30, 2016

Andy_Cole_Chadwick Martin Bailey.jpgEarlier this year, CMB proudly introduced our new Consulting and Research Services team (CRS). This team is an extension of our long-term commitment to extending the reach of traditional market research through strategic consulting services. To better understand this team’s unique contributions to client engagements, I sat down one of our strategy consultants, Andy Cole. 

Andy, thanks for taking the time out of your day to connect. Can you tell me a little about your professional background and experiences? 

In a word, I would describe my career as “varied” or “diverse,” but most people look at my background and wonder if I have a problem sitting still. I’m originally trained as a mechanical engineer, and I started out doing R&D projects involving aerospace with Google, non-emissive fuels with the EPA, military-focused brain trauma with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), and vehicle collision forensics (with a small, lesser-known engineering company). My first regular job had me working for a large alternative energy company that would send me all over North America to climb 300-meter industrial wind turbines to figure out why they were offline, design temporary solutions to get them up and running ASAP, and work with R&D in Denmark to develop a permanent fix for systemic issues. 

I’m not sure if that meets anyone else’s definition of a regular job. So, how did you get from scaling wind turbines to a career in strategic consulting and research? 

I realized that I had a strong interest in business and management, so I got my MBA and began consulting with large, small, and non-profit organizations on a wide range of topics, including social media marketing, energy, executive training programs, and product development. I also launched two successful businesses in the innovation marketplace, helping large corporations rapidly develop new technologies and discover emerging markets, which was a great adventure but lacked the lifestyle I was ultimately looking for. 

I value diverse experiences because the most innovative solutions are borrowed from other industries and combined or repurposed in a new way. To me, this is the difference between being a true partner who can “connect the dots” versus a consultant who simply knows the best practices in a given industry. Clients don’t hire CMB if they’re just looking for best practices—we recommend a Google search for that purpose. 

Given your unique line of sight, in your opinion, what's the greatest opportunity facing businesses today that a research-based consulting engagement could support? 

There is an enormous trend in companies turning from sales-focused strategies to customer-centric design. When you hear companies embracing things like user experience, VOC, pivoting, and iterating, it’s all about observing and listening to customers, making constant measurements, testing new concepts in the market, etc. That all just screams for custom research. 

When companies are looking to become more customer-centric, they have to have a deep understanding of the target market that is backed by market information and unique insights. This is a huge opportunity for businesses to gain an advantage over their competition, and it’s truly CMB’s sweet spot. 

It seems that more and more consultants are embracing the impact of research. What’s your take on the role of research in the future of business consulting? 

The bottom line is that companies are looking for clear and confident strategic direction, and the language of today’s business is increasingly metric-oriented. It’s not enough for consultants to simply say that customers will like an idea or that a decision will result in greater revenues. The savvy business leader needs to know exactly how much more preferable a concept is and exactly how much revenue they should expect compared to taking an alternative path. Smart clients don’t trust advice without evidence to support it, and that is exactly what research provides. Good research forms the foundation on which effective strategies are built. 

Can you provide an example of a recent client engagement that blurred the lines of delineation between market research and strategic consulting? 

With the Affordable Care Act shaking up the entire healthcare industry, a large national insurance carrier saw an opportunity to use intimate knowledge of customer journey experiences and expectations to figure out which stages and channels were most influential (and would therefore pose the greatest marketing opportunity). Furthermore, the company wanted to know what messaging resonated with individual customers at each stage and within each channel, so it could be sure that marketing efforts would be as effective as possible.  

To tackle this ambiguous challenge, we took a multi-pronged and multi-phased approach: 

  1. A qualitative phase—involving in-depth interviews and moderated online discussion boards—to surface key stages, channels, and underlying context from the customer journey.
  2. A facilitated workshop with stakeholders and decision-makers to discuss key findings/insights and hypotheses, brainstorm potential solutions, and align on the path forward.
  3. A quantitative phase to reveal what individual customers value most throughout their experience and to identify which experiences have the potential to be particularly influential in the decision to purchase. 

It’s great when you get the opportunity to really dig in to that level of detail. What did you learn? 

At the conclusion of the project, we not only identified a number of surprising marketing opportunities by disproving a few fundamental assumptions, but we also validated (and put to rest) several long-standing hypotheses that were a stagnating source of internal debate. We also collaborated with the client to identify creative messaging campaigns that directly aligned with the trends stemming from our research as well as with the organization’s overarching strategic objectives. 

I look forward to hearing about more projects like this one that blur the lines in the future. Thanks again for taking time out of your day, Andy. 

Heather Magaw is the Vice President of Client Services at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has never climbed a wind turbine in her life. . .and never intends to.

Andy Cole is a Consultant at Chadwick Martin Bailey and has already left the interview to go investigate three seemingly unrelated things. 

Learn more about our strategy consulting expertise.

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, strategy consulting, healthcare research, business decisions, growth and innovation, customer journey

Reaping the Rewards of Big Data

Posted by Heather Magaw

Thu, Apr 09, 2015

HiResIt’s both an exciting and challenging time to be a researcher. Exciting because we can collect data at speeds our predecessors could only dream about and challenging because we must help our partners stay nimble enough to really benefit from this data deluge. So, how do we help our clients reap the rewards of Big Data without drowning in it? Start with the end in mind: If you’re a CMB client, you know that we start every engagement with the end in mind before a single question is ever written. First, we ask what business decisions the research will help answer. Once we have those, we begin to identify what information is necessary to support those decisions. This keeps us focused and informs everything from questionnaire design to implementation.

Leverage behavioral and attitudinal data: While business intelligence (BI) teams have access to mountains of transactional, financial, and performance data, they often lack insight into what drives customer behavior, which is a critical element of understanding the full picture. BI teams are garnering more and more organizational respect due to data access and speed of analysis, yet market research departments (and their partners like CMB) are the ones bringing the voice of the customer to life and answering the “why?” questions.

Tell a compelling story: One of the biggest challenges of having “too much” data is that data from disparate sources can provide conflicting information, but time-starved decision makers don't have time to sort through all of it in great detail. In a world in which data is everywhere, the ability to take insights beyond a bar chart and bring it to life is critical. It’s why we spend a lot of time honing our storytelling skills and not just our analytic chops. We know that multiple data sources must be analyzed from different angles and through multiple lenses to provide both a full picture and one that can be acted upon.

Big Data is ripe with potential. Enterprise-level integration of information has the power to change the game for businesses of all sizes, but data alone isn’t enough. The keen ability to ask the right questions and tell a holistic story based on the results gives our clients the confidence to make those difficult investment decisions. 2014 was the year of giving Big Data a seat at the table, but for the rest of 2015, market researchers need to make sure their seat is also reserved so that we can continue to give decision makers the real story of the ever-changing business landscape.

Heather is the VP of Client Services, and she admits to becoming stymied by analysis paralyses when too much data is available. She confesses that she resorts to selecting restaurants and vacation destinations based solely on verbal recommendations from friends who take the time to tell a compelling story instead of slogging through an over-abundance of online reviews. 

Topics: big data, storytelling, business decisions

CMB: Our People Make the Difference

Posted by Heather Magaw

Wed, Apr 30, 2014

CMB, Careers, Open PositionsAnyone who’s ever managed a service-oriented team knows that success or failure is often contingent on the successes or failures of your employees. Their professional successes—and sometimes even their personal successes—have a positive and lasting impact on your organization. Then, of course, there’s the flip side of that coin that can result in collateral damage across an organization.At CMB, we take talent management seriously because it’s serious stuff. We literally live and breathe in a team-oriented environment to deliver against our client commitments. To do this day-in-and-day-out takes both the hard skills required of market researchers coupled with softer skills required for teams to thrive.  From the interview process to active team management to individual development plans, we are building and supporting teams and individuals that align with our core CMBehaviors:

  • Accountability

  • Attention to Detail

  • Autonomy

  • CMB Citizenship

  • Collaboration

  • Communication

  • Flexibility

  • Initiative

  • Problem Resolution

  • Strategic Thinking

The CMBehaviors aren’t just a bulleted list of the latest organizational buzz-words; these concepts have both meaning and impact, in addition to being closely related and producing significant interaction effects. For instance, Strategic Thinkingis a hallmark of CMB and one of the reasons we have a history of successfully helping clients solve their unique business problems. It’s not good enough to have only the senior-most team members engaged in Strategic Thinking—it’s expected of the entire project team. This, of course, can only be realized through effective Collaboration. Project teams are often greater than the sum of their parts, but to fully realize the full potential of the team requires clear and concise Communication.

It’s not easy to hire and manage to these standards, but we believe it’s part what our clients recognize as unique (and dare I say better?) about working with CMB. Our commitment to our colleagues (we like to call ourselves CMBers) is a direct reflection of our commitment to exceptional client service.

Heather is VP of Client Services and is awestruck with the potential and commitment of the current Client Services team members at CMB. She’s proud to be a member of the awesome team who get to call themselves CMBers.

Would you like to work with some of our top clients like eBay, Facebook, Hilton, Bank of America, Starbucks, Avis-Budget, Neiman Marcus, and Electronic Arts?

Join our team! We are a Honomichl Top 50 company offering the flexible collaborative environment of a small company with the big world expertise that comes from working with leading brands across a wide array of industries.

Check out our open positions here.

 

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, our people