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My New Driving Tribe

Posted by Jay Weiner, PhD

Thu, Aug 16, 2018

ambiguous driver

The kind of car you drive says a lot about who you are—at least according to other peoples’ perceptions. And the more people identify with that perception, the more likely they are to use that brand, or in this case, drive that car.

This is important for marketers responsible for effectively communicating their brand to the target market. How is their typical customer perceived? Does that customer image align with their brand?

I’m not much of a joiner so I never thought much about what my car says about me. That is, until I joined a new tribe of car owners.

When I was recently debating buying a new car, my colleague said she wouldn’t speak to me again if I bought this certain brand. I did anyway. Even though she might be unhappy that I now drive this particular car, she still speaks to me (must need some analysis done).

In a self-funded study, we found the typical owner of this brand is viewed as: wealthy, confident, fun, stuck up, young, snobby, arrogant, and cool, among others. In reading this description, you can probably tell it’s not a Buick. 

But this brand’s marketing team might have a strong interest to figure out how best to play up the positive characteristics (cool) and play down or negate the negative dimensions (arrogant/stuck up). My kids still don’t think I’m cool.

word cloud 2Why does this brand generate such a view? It over-indexes on dimensions that might not seem approachable (i.e., worldly, trendsetting) and under-indexes on dimensions that might resonate with a wider audience (i.e., responsible, genuine, relaxed). This perception reflects a very specific view of the typical driver and risks alienating a potentially huge customer base.

Maybe that’s okay if you’re a niche product with a narrow target market, but then again, maybe not.

over under indexing

What does it all mean? Interestingly enough, I’ve seen a change in the way my fellow motorists treat me on the road. Take that with a grain of salt as we typically refer to drivers around here as MASSH@^%$ (editor made me type that despite my STET comment on the first draft).

In my previous domestic brand car, when I put my turn signal on, folks tended to let me change lanes. Now, they race up to box me out. At red lights, other drivers want to race. While my car does have some serious horse power, I don’t drive it that way. I guess if folks don’t see me as kind and caring based on the car I drive, why should I expect them to be kind and caring to me on the road?

Marketers beyond the car industry should be thinking about this, too. How are you communicating who your brand’s typical customer is? Is that image relatable? Is it desirable? Your messaging should clearly and effectively communicate who your customer is in the best light—whatever that means for your brand.

Dr. Jay is CMB’s Chief Methodologist and VP of Advanced Analytics and is always up for tackling your most pressing questions. Submit yours and he could answer it in his next blog!

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Topics: Dear Dr. Jay, AffinID

Lobster Served with a Side of Gratitude to CMB Employees

Posted by Savannah House

Wed, Aug 08, 2018

Last Friday we took a break to celebrate our team’s hard work at the annual CMB Summer Party. It was a hot and humid day—even for New England’s standards—but that didn’t stop us from coming out to celebrate the summer season with a good old fashioned New England clambake.

The Summer Party is one of our favorite days of the year because it brings Boston-based and remote CMBers together for a fun day of good food, conversation, and relaxation. Nothing says team bonding like matching lobster bibs! 

CMB Summer Party 2018 (1)

The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Call it cliché, but at CMB, it’s true. CMBers are the company’s most valuable resources, and whether it’s at the Summer Party, one of the many CMB Social Committee-sponsored events, or our internal CMBU training program, we continually strive to recognize employees’ hard work, foster creativity, provide flexibility, and encourage professional growth.

CMB Summer Party 2018 (6)

Interested in joining the CMB team? We’re always looking for smart, curious, and experienced market research professionals. Check out our latest openings below:

Open Roles

Topics: Chadwick Martin Bailey, CMB Careers, professional development

Optimizing Your Conference ROI

Posted by Julie Kurd

Thu, Aug 02, 2018

attending a conference (Resized)

With tightening travel and professional development budgets, I've adapted an earlier blog post about making the most of your conference experience. Conferences are expensive and so your company wants to know what’s in it for them.

And while of course you need to prove the ROI, you also need to think about it as "WIIFM" ("What’s in it for me”) to squeeze every valuable ounce out of your conference experience and delight your company.

With the US insights community’s largest industry conferences (TMRE and CRC) right around the corner, let’s talk personal branding and ROI:

  • Block off your office calendar during the days of the conference. Activate your out of office message and be sure to mention that you’re WORKING offsite all day.  It is really a crime against your boss and company to be dialing into staff meetings or writing emails from your hotel room when you mutually agreed that you’d be learning at a conference. The conference ROI of you missing the conference because you were sitting in your hotel room…it’s not pretty.  Thank your boss/peers/staff for this critical professional development opportunity as appropriate and promise the right person at your company a brief ROI summary (more later).
  • Highlight the agenda prior to the conference. Map out which sessions you want to attend. When there are several tracks running concurrently, I circle my agenda with all the sessions I want to see and then go back and refine when I’m actually at the conference. Sometimes the same (or similar) session is held at two different times during a conference so you don’t have to make tough tradeoffs. Or sometimes the keynote has a working session and after their opening presentation, so you could hear them twice or try something new.
  • Plan your elevator pitch and ask: Whether you’re reserved or chatty, you’re going meet a lot of new people at conferences, so make sure to prepare your elevator pitch:
    1. “My name is ___ and I work for ___, the makers of ___. In the coming year we’re focused on improving our ___, and for that reason, I’m here at the conference to learn more about ___.” 
    2. Here’s an example: “We just finished up a big customer journey project, which will help us drive the right messages to the right people at the right moments.” You can follow up with something like: “In the coming year we’re going to do a lot of messaging optimization and concept testing to bring those moments into focus by segment.” That’s your hook, and your reason for the conversation you’re having.   
    3. Next comes your question. You’ve offered a bit about what you do, but who are you talking to?  If they are a peer or competitor, ask, “How about you?”  That’s it.  You need to bring this information back to your company.  If they are a supplier of research, ask, “How would you approach this if you were pitching to me?” 
  • Recap at least three sessions in writing so you can talk specifically about the cases during a future lunch and/or meeting:  Don’t just return to the office and proclaim, “the conference was great; I learned so much.” Listen fiercely and write down who spoke, what they said, how they presented. Take something forward that you can apply in your own career. Why was that session useful?  Did the speaker talk about a new technique? Did they present in a style that you want to mimic? Did they talk about the world of tomorrow in a way that’s accessible to you, can you bring it to life back at your company? Once you finish writing and are back home, how can you mention that session 3x, so it sticks in your active memory and changes something about your habits? 
  • Make a few new acquaintances (and connect on LinkedIn):  You want to keep actively learning and building your professional network, so connect on LinkedIn with speakers and conference goers. One of our F100 clients recently told me, “I’m painfully introverted so I just go to the sessions.” And while of course I understand, it’s vital to us all to expand our network, from a peer, collaborator, and employee recruitment perspective. Let’s always be learning together.
  • Bonus tip—take a photo of yourself with one of the famous speakers and share it with your CMO: OK, you don’t NEED to do this, but you need to come up with one visual representation of you broadening your horizons at the conference. If you’re speaking, get a photo of you while presenting (any of us will take it… just ask).  If you’re attending, snap a picture of your favorite speakers or in “Booth City” where you’ll meet a number of suppliers.  Share your photo with your company so they can experience your effort (and visualize you learning vs. at the pool). If relevant to you, even consider sharing it on LinkedIn or Twitter because a picture tells a great story (and gets a lot of likes!)

Are you heading to CRC or TMRE? If so, reach out and let’s connect while there!

Julie is an inspired TMRE Sponsor, participant, amplifier, socializer, and spotter, interested in your stories; follow her on LinkedIn.

Topics: conference recap, professional development

Personalization, Privacy and the Creep Factor

Posted by Julia Walker

Wed, Jul 25, 2018

online shopping

You’ve seen it before: a pair of shoes that follow you all the way from Zappos.com to Facebook, or even creepier, when you have a conversation about Patagonia and suddenly, Instagram serves you an ad for their latest down jacket. Today’s marketers don’t have to guess where to place their ads anymore. Instead, they track online behavior to tailor ads, offers, products, and experiences to the specific consumer.

Leveraging online consumer behavioral data for personalization is now a standard marketing strategy, but what are the implications for brands and consumers?

Personalization drives consumer behavior. In fact, 80% of people are more likely to do business with a company if it offers them a personalized experience. Amazon revolutionized personalization when they rolled out their product recommendation algorithm—a feature some attribute to their huge sales increase (29% in the second fiscal quarter) in 2012. And it’s only advanced since then. With the help of AI and big data, brands can deliver highly custom experiences to consumers. Now, personalization spans devices, following you from your tablet to your desktop, and can recommend your next TV binge or anticipate an unmet need.

Personalization can also inspire loyalty, which means a greater customer lifetime value and possible advocacy. With forty-four percent of consumers saying they will likely make additional purchases after a personalized shopping experience, this is a tremendous opportunity for brands to break through the clutter with tailored messaging and offers.

But is there such thing as too much personalization? As brands continue to collect data to better understand and serve their customers, where does the line between service and invasion of privacy begin to blur? InMoment's 2018 CX Trends Report found that 75% of consumers find most forms of personalization at least somewhat “creepy”. And while half of consumers admitted they’d still shop with the brand after a creepy experience, almost a quarter reported it would drive them to a competitor.

The stakes are high for companies collecting customer data: 70% of consumers would stop doing business with a company that experienced a data breach. And this data is exactly what enables brands to personalize their offerings.

So, we’ll continue to see this tension play out across industries—while consumers continue to expect more personalization, brands must deliver tailored experiences without risking the creep factor.

Julia Walker is a Project Manager at CMB and an avid online shopper whose decisions are often influenced by algorithm recommendations.

Topics: retail research, Artificial Intelligence, ecommerce, data privacy

Live Sports: Fans' Last Connection to Cable is Fraying

Posted by McKenzie Mann

Wed, Jul 18, 2018

friends watching tv

Earlier this year, I was trying to watch my beloved Patriots play in the AFC East Divisional Championship game while standing in the airport security line. After numerous failed attempts at downloading streaming apps that promised an uninterrupted game, I resorted to real-time game updates in the form of a line with how many yards the ball went each down and a description of the play.

I was frustrated, to say the least—a missed opportunity as we know fostering the right positive emotions is key to building and maintaining loyal and engaged customers.

When I finally made it through security, I went straight to a restaurant where Tom Brady was on every screen. This time, cable television saved the day.

Live sports is one of the last threads tethering people to traditional cable packages. For most other content, consumers have a plethora of services to choose from—traditional streaming like Netflix, premium network streaming like HBO Now, and even broadcast network streaming like CBS All Access. And with Netflix recently becoming the number one choice for television viewing, it’s no surprise an estimated 22.2 million people cut the cord in 2017—a whopping 33% increase from 2016. 

As more consumers leave the traditional model for “à la carte” style, nontraditional services like Yahoo, Facebook, and ESPN are challenging cable providers’ last bastion of sports. While there have been hiccups in some of these services, like poor streaming quality and cutting out of games altogether, the technology is improving and eventually will offer sports fans a legitimate alternative to watch games on.  

To combat this rising competition, CBS and the NFL recently extended their agreement to stream all games on CBS All Access through the 2022 season—safeguarding their rights to the coveted (and profitable) football games, at least for now. 

New technology is disrupting the industry and cable providers will need to adapt and embrace innovation to stay competitive. This is already happening for some. Charter Communications’ Spectrum now offers à la carte channels instead of the traditional comprehensive packages, Comcast has expanded their on-demand library (including full seasons), and DirecTV now offers DirecTV Now, a streaming service separate from their satellite plan. Some major providers are even exploring new verticals to add to their portfolios, as is the case with Comcast’s Xfinity Mobile.

There’s tremendous opportunity for traditional providers as the competition in the digital streaming market heats up. But companies must carefully consider these opportunities—with so many options (and more to come) available to consumers, solutions must impress off the bat, or lose fans to a competitor for good.

We’ve seen this play out in other emerging tech categories, like virtual assistants. As big players like Apple, Google, and Amazon pour millions into making their virtual assistant tech smarter, they need to embrace a new kind of customer-centricity—one that’s built on an understanding of the functional, emotional, and social identity benefits that drive adoption, engagement, and loyalty. To learn more, watch our quick 20-minute webinar and learn how brands can win the virtual assistant war—lessons for any brand experiencing disruption in their category:

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McKenzie Mann is a Project Manager II at CMB. She spends most of her spare time trying to convince her friends that it’s funny to replace the word “man” with “mann.” It's a work in progress, but mann will it be great when it catches on.

Topics: technology research, television, digital media and entertainment research, growth and innovation, emotion